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Daily Archive : Monday November 19, 2012

News

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    Rafaela Garcia of South Elgin had her shopping cart overflowing at the Target store in West Dundee on a previous Black Friday. This year, Target stores will open their doors at 9 p.m. Thanksgiving Day.

    Savvy Black Friday shoppers share their strategies

    While many people are busy planning a way to make sure the turkey, stuffing, veggies and cranberry sauce all are ready at the same time, others are spending these last few days before Thanksgiving planning out how to get a new iPod and cozy slippers all before the turkey's even digested. Carolyn Brooks of Lake in the Hills said she's already been on the phone and online, plotting out where to go...

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    Dawn Patrol: Oak Brook doctor stabbed; Antioch man’s plane crashes

    An Oak Brook doctor will recover from a stabbing in Chicago. Two killed in crash in plane registered to an Antioch man. Quinn launches pension reform website. Bears face tough 49ers defense tonight. Bulls lose second in a row.

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    Justin Bieber is smothered in kisses by presenter Jenny McCarthy as he accepts the award for favorite album - pop/rock for “Believe” at the 40th Anniversary American Music Awards Sunday night in Los Angeles.

    Weekend in Review: Judge’s red-light camera gig; AMAs
    What you may have missed over the weekend: Oak Brook physician stabbed; Lake County judge now decides red-light camera violations; Des Plaines schools chief named Superintendent of the Year; W. Chicago fire victims return home; Justin Bieber and Nicki Minaj have good night at AMAs; Bears need a better Campbell vs. 49ers; Bulls lose; Obama visits Myanmar; and an Israeli strike kills 11 in Gaza.

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    FHenry Anderson, left, and James Parker Shield welcome people to the new Little Shell Chippewa Cree Visitor Center in Montana.

    Mont. tribe seeks to turn corner in its history

    Montana's Little Shell tribe appeared poised to fade from history in recent years after it was denied federal government recognition, lost its financial support from the state and saw its elected leadership splinter.But the past year has brought a sharp turnaround for the 4,500-member landless tribe that long has existed on society's fringe.

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    This 1970 handout photo shows Donna Willing.

    Sex offender suspected in 1970 Wis. child murder

    Virginia Davis describes says the pain left behind by her 9-year-old sister's 1970 rape and strangulation as being like "a million holes."Only 4 years old at the time, Davis knew little about the crime. The subject remained off-limits for the next four decades for many in a family that hoped to forget the hurt. But Davis couldn't forget, and after years seeking help to solve her sister's killing,...

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    Chimpanzees sit in an enclosure at the Chimpanzee Eden rehabilitation center, near Nelspruit, South Africa.

    Even apes have `midlife crises,’ study finds

    Chimpanzees in a midlife crisis? It sounds like a setup for a joke. But there it is, in the title of a report published Monday in a scientific journal: "Evidence for a midlife crisis in great apes." So what do these apes do? Buy red Ferraris? Leave their mates for some cute young bonobos? Uh, no.

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    Owen Hurd wrote “After the Fact: The Surprising Fates of American History’s Heroes, Villains and Supporting Characters.”

    Mt. Prospect native writes history’s epilogues

    Owen Hurd loves story endings — not the endings that are presented in a book or newspaper, but the stuff that happens after those. Hurd, a Mount Prospect native who now lives in Chicago, decided there might be a book in such historical epilogues. So he compiled some of his favorites into “After the Fact: The Surprising Fates of American History’s Heroes, Villains and Supporting...

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    Lake County Sheriff Mark Curran is backing proposed legislation that would allow illegal immigrants to get driver's licenses, saying it's an economic imperative for our financially struggling state.

    Lake County sheriff: Illegal immigrants should get driver's licenses

    Lake County Sheriff Mark Curran is backing proposed legislation that would allow illegal immigrants to get driver's licenses, saying it's an economic imperative for our financially struggling state. "We need them to be getting to work," Curran said. "We need them to have driver's licenses."

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    New watchdog group aims to “reboot” Illinois government

    A new government watchdog group aiming to inform and engage the state's citizens officially launched Monday. The inaugural edition featured an op-ed about pensions by Gov. Pat Quinn.

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    North Aurora annexes former orchard, OKs business and multifamily zoning

    The North Aurora village board Monday agreed to annex 41 acres on its west side and allow a developer flexibility to use all of the property for businesses or some of it for multifamily residences such as rental apartments.

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    BlackFinn American Saloon’s late-night liquor permit was reinstated Monday, allowing the bar to resume serving alcohol until 1 a.m. during the week and 2 a.m. on the weekends.

    BlackFinn regains late-night liquor permit in Naperville

    Sanctions against Naperville's BlackFinn American Saloon were lifted Monday after a weekend free of police calls and liquor violations. Mayor George Pradel, who also serves as the city's liquor commissioner, said he reinstated the late-night permit after confirming with both police and city prosecutors that the bar did not have any problems during the weekend.

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    Illinois Lottery Superintendent Michael Jones presents a $1 million check to hair stylists at A Shear Delight in Hanover Park. Among the nine winners who pool their money every week are, from left, Barb Eberwein, Gerlinde Hruska, Nicole Murray, Lorraine Smith, salon owner Donna Carman, Sharon Melbourn and Donna Thomas.

    Hanover Park beauty salon workers win lottery

    You might call it "shear" luck. Nine woman who work together at A Shear Delight in Hanover Park will split $1 million after snagging a winning ticket from the Illinois Lottery's Halloween Millionaire Raffle. "My first reaction was there's just no way," said Donna Carman, owner of the beauty salon. "It takes a long time for something like that to sink in."

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    Wheeling gives developer one more chance

    After a scare featuring three words village officials do not want to hear general obligation bonds the Wheeling board agreed Monday to give the developer one more chance to get things together for the Wheeling Town Center.

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    Arlington Hts. passes smaller tax increase than proposed

    After a week to consider it, Arlington Heights is now planning a smaller tax levy increase for next year than was previously proposed, the village board decided on Monday. The Arlington Heights village board on Monday approved an amendment to the tax levy ordinance and will be asking for a 1.2 percent increase in 2012 rather than the 1.92 percent increase that was proposed last week. Board...

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    Hoffman Estates approves demolition of two Golf Road buildings

    Two vacant buildings on Golf Road in Hoffman Estates will soon be demolished and replaced with grass until redevelopment occurs. The Hoffman Estates village board agreed Monday to pay Langos Corp. $48,780 for the demolition, asbestos remediation, Freon removal and topsoil and grass restoration at 75 and 85 E. Golf Road.

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    Barrington meeting a preview of election debate

    An especially lively town-hall meeting in Barrington Monday night hinted at the debate that will likely dominate next April's village board election. From beginning to end, the theme of Monday's two-hour exchange between village officials and the public was the nature of Barrington's downtown redevelopment and the tax-increment finance district providing the public side of its funding.

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    St. Charles Fire Chief Patrick Mullen is retiring at the end of November. A replacement has not yet been named.

    Audit knocks St. Charles police, fire pension boards

    At a time of serpentine pension reform debate in Illinois, St. Charles officials learned Monday night that two of their pension funds have no system of checks and balances in place. Both the police and the fire pension funds have custodians who also serve as the investment broker. Outside auditor Fred Lantz described that setup as "the fox guarding the hen house."

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    Judy Abruscato

    Abruscato will seek new term in Wheeling

    Judy Abruscato will run for a second full term as Wheeling village president. Former Trustee Pat Horcher, who served 16 years on the village board, also will seek the presidency. Trustees Bill Hein and Ken Brady will seek re-election, while Trustee Dean Agiris, would not comment on his intentions.

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    This building at 20 E. Main St. in downtown Lake Zurich has long been vacant, but a developer is working to make it suitable for commercial use in a special taxing zone.

    Lake Zurich to give developer $12,000 to upgrade water pipe

    Lake Zurich village board members Monday evening agreed that $12,000 should be provided to help defray a developer's expense to upgrade a water line for a building under renovation for commercial use downtown.

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    The Carol Stream Library board voted Monday to put the 7½-acre Kuhn Road property up for sale.

    Carol Stream library board votes to sell land

    A For Sale sign could soon be going up at 480 N. Kuhn Road — a controversial 7 1/2-acre vacant piece of land owned by the Carol Stream Public Library. The library board voted 6-1 Monday to list the property with Wheaton-based Realty Executives, whose Realtors have previously estimated the land to be worth $1,897,000. The land was purchased by the library in 2003 with intentions of building...

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    Mundelein coat and cleat drive

    The Mundelein Soccer Club has started its annual Winter Coat and Cleat collection drive in conjunction with Carl Sandburg Middle School and the Round Lake Area Park District.

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    President Barack Obama tours the Shwedagon Pagoda in Yangon, Myanmar, Monday. In a historic trip to a long-shunned land, Obama showered praise and promises of more U.S. help to Myanmar if the Asian nation keeps building its new democracy.

    Obama makes history with Myanmar, Cambodia visits

    On a history-making trip, President Barack Obama on Monday paid the first visit by an American leader to Myanmar and Cambodia, two Asian countries with troubled histories, one on the mend and the other still a cause of concern.

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    Israelis hide in a concrete tube during a rocket attack from Gaza, in Nitzan, southern Israel, Monday.

    Israel, Hamas trade fire and tough truce proposals

    Israel and Gaza's Hamas rulers traded fire and tough cease-fire proposals Monday, and threatened to escalate their border conflict if diplomacy fails. No deal appeared near.

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    Mir Shah of Oak Brook was stabbed in a downtown Chicago hotel on Saturday but is expected to make a full recovery. Shah, 67, was attacked Saturday in the bathroom of the Westin Hotel on North Michigan Avenue and fought off the attacker.

    Arrest made in stabbing of Oak Brook doctor

    A 56-year-old man is charged with attempted murder in connection with a weekend stabbing of an Oak Brook doctor inside a Chicago hotel. According to authorities, officers captured the suspect, Jimmy Harris, near Michigan and Delaware after he stabbed two people inside the Westin Hotel. Prosecutors say Harris was out on parole for less than a week when he stabbed suburban oncologist Dr. Mir Jafar...

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    Huntley teachers ratify latest contract

    Huntley teachers ratified a tentative agreement with the school district Monday night. Details of the contract were not released but union co-president Julie McLaughlin said 98 percent of teachers present voted in favor of the contract.

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    Volunteers from Home Depot work on remodeling a kitchen in a group home in Hoffman Estates for disabled adults that is operated by Clearbrook.

    Hoffman Estates home for disabled adults gets renovations

    A home for disabled adults in Hoffman Estates now has a new kitchen, thanks to the generosity of the Home Depot and Rebuilding Together. Last week, a Rebuilding Together crew demolished the kitchen in the home one day, and the next day a volunteer Home Depot crew completed the renovation with supplies donated by the store. The crew replaced cabinets, installed a new garbage disposal, put in an...

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    Cook County to offer DUI memorial markers

    Cook County announced a new program that allows families of those killed by drunken drivers on county roads to purchase a commemorative sign for the crash site.

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    Gov. Pat Quinn’s web campaign for pension reform includes a cartoon snake named “Squeezy the Pension Python.”

    Cartoon snake part of Quinn’s pension reform campaign

    Featuring a cartoon snake named "Squeezy" and photos of adorable children, Gov. Pat Quinn's new online campaign to get Illinoisans excited about pension reform quickly inspired mock Web pages and criticism from unions, lawmakers and the Twitterverse. But some social media experts, and a few fellow Democrats, called it an innovative approach to a complex issue that could work in Quinn's favor.

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    A man walks past two of the traditional Nativity scenes in Santa Monica, Calif., last December.

    Judge sides with atheists, rejects Nativity displays

    There's no room for the baby Jesus, the manger or the wise men this Christmas in a Santa Monica park following a judge's ruling Monday against churches that tried to keep a 60-year Nativity tradition alive after atheists stole the show with anti-God messages.

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    Nicole Parfitt

    Antioch High freshman and her father identified as plane crash victims

    Friends of an Antioch man and his daughter who were killed when their single-engine plane crashed in a Wisconsin field called their deaths a "devastating tragedy." Todd Parfitt, 50, and Nicole Parfitt, 14, were Sunday when Todd Parfitt's Grumman AA1 crashed into a cornfield near the Burlington Municipal Airport just before 1:30 p.m. Sunday, Walworth County sheriff's officials said Monday.

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    Crystal Lake man found dead in Lincoln Park

    A Crystal Lake man was found dead in a Lincoln Park alley Sunday.

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    A private beach club lies wrecked atop the sea wall in Sea Bright, N.J., in this Nov. 15 photo. President Obama sent two Cabinet secretaries to the Jersey shore the next day to promise federal aid to the state for as long as it takes to recover from Superstorm Sandy.

    Superstorm shines light on federal beach program

    Towns along the Jersey shore that made use of federal money to build up beaches came through Superstorm Sandy with far less damage than those that didn't, findings that are sure to intensify a debate that has raged for years over the wisdom of pumping millions of dollars' worth of sand onto the coastline, only to see it wash away continually.

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    Antonio Romanucci is the lawyer of a 14-year-old boy’s mother, who held a news conference to announce the family has filed a lawsuit against school officials and former coaches at Maine West High School in Des Plaines charging they allowed acts of hazing to occur, including assault, battery and sexual assault.

    Maine West mom says son sexually assaulted in soccer hazing

    The mother of a 14-year-old Maine West High School boy who she says was sexually assaulted by members of the school's boy's varsity soccer team during a hazing ritual announced Monday the family has filed a lawsuit against school officials and coaches. "I'm very angry at the staff and the coaches," said the student's mother, who was visibly upset. "School should be safe for kids."

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    Former Dixon comptroller Rita Crundwell pleaded guilty last week to stealing $53 million from the city.

    Ex-Dixon comptroller’s boats, cars on auction block

    U.S. Marshals are auctioning a half-dozen vehicles and boats that once were owned by a Dixon comptroller who admitted to stealing $53 million in taxpayer money.

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    Todd Scalzo

    Scalzo, Suess capture top spots on Wheaton council ballot

    Wheaton City Councilman Todd Scalzo says he doesn't really believe getting the top spot on the ballot will give him an advantage in his re-election bid. Still, it's better to be a little superstitious than on the losing end of a close race. The 34-year-old officially launched his campaign for a second term on Monday morning when he was the first to file his nominating petitions.

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    Daniel Dawson

    State wants Elgin man committed for repeated sex crimes

    A judge rules there is probable cause to detain an Elgin man after his release from prison next week for sexually abusing a boy in an Elgin mall. The Illinois Attorney General's Office wants Daniel Dawson classified as a Sexually Violent Person and held by the state's Department of Human Services until he is no longer a danger to society.

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    Candidate filing opens for primaries in Northwest Cook County

    Monday was the first day of filing for candidates in three Northwest suburbs — Hoffman Estates, Palatine and Schaumburg — with potential primary elections on Feb. 26.But despite the emergence of some expected contested races Monday, no primaries look likely. All three villages will have general elections on April 9, like every other. But only these Northwest Cook County suburbs have...

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    Two first-time novelists selected for ‘Naperville Reads’

    The 12th annual Naperville Reads celebration will feature the works of two first-time novelists: R.J. Palacio and Naomi Benaron. And more than any other year, their works were chosen to give the community something to talk about. "Both authors deal with very complex issues in their books that lend themselves to discussion," Naperville Public Library spokeswoman Susan Greenwood said. "We're...

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    Elgin City Clerk Kimberly Dewis, right, helps candidates file their paperwork early Monday morning at Elgin City Hall. From left are Judy Dunne (filing for her husband, Councilman Richard Dunne), Tom McCarthy and Terry Gavin.

    Eight file for soon-to-be crowded Elgin council race

    One former councilman, one incumbent, one second-time candidate and two newcomers will be at the top of the ballot in the race for Elgin City Council. All five residents had their candidate petitions ready by 8 a.m. Monday to turn into Elgin City Clerk Kimberly Dewis, who will draw names for the ballot order Nov. 28. Later Monday, two more incumbents and another newcomer also field. The Elgin...

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    Alejandro Avalos

    Men plead guilty to 2011 armed robbery spree

    Two men accused in a string of armed robberies in Hanover Park and Streamwood last year pleaded guilty to the charges Monday. A Cook County judge sentenced Alejandro Avalos, 20, of Streamwood, to 12 years in prison and Juan Mora, 20, of Hanover Park, to seven years in prison in exchange for their guilty pleas.

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    Continuum of care facility for seniors nears for Wauconda

    Wauconda village officials will vote to rezone and amend an annexation agreement for property on Gilmer Road to allow for a senior housing facility to include independent and assisted living and memory care. The site adjacent to the Liberty Lakes subdivision originally was planned for 168 townhomes.

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    Primary election likely in Aurora’s 4th, 9th wards

    Five candidates filed nominating petitions Monday for a city council seat in Aurora's 9th Ward and six filed in Ward 4, setting the stage for a pair of Feb. 26 primary elections. The top four vote-getters in the primaries for each of the two wards will advance to the April 9 general election.

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    CHRISTOPHER HANKINS/chankins@dailyherald.com North Aurora Village President Dale Berman presides during an open house at the new police station in September 2010.

    4 incumbents file in North Aurora

    Four incumbents filed to run for election in North Aurora, including Village President Dale Berman, who is seeking his third term.

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    Nadia Greenidge

    Ribfest volunteer pleads guilty to theft

    A Chicago woman was sentenced to two years of probation Monday for stealing more than $500 from the Naperville Exchange Club while volunteering at Ribfest. Nadia Greenidge, 29, pleaded guilty to misdemeanor theft in exchange for having a more serious felony charge dismissed. DuPage County Judge Blanche Hill Fawell imposed the sentence.

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    Gamblers bet hundreds of thousands of dollars in the first month of operation for video gaming machines at suburban bars.

    Video gambling profits after one month

    Gamblers have pumped hundreds of thousands of dollars into video gaming machines in the devices' first month of formal operation at suburban bars.

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    Pet Night with Santa at Gurnee Mills

    Animal-lovers will have the opportunity to bring their furry friends to Pet Night with Santa at Gurnee Mills.

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    Firefighter injured in Deer Park

    One firefighter suffered minor injuries in an early morning fire Sunday in Deer Park.

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    Baby gorilla born at Chicago’s Lincoln Park Zoo

    Lincoln Park Zoo in Chicago has a second baby gorilla birth in the last two months. Her mother is 16-year-old Rollie. The father is 23-year-old silverback gorilla Kwan.

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    This crowd lined up for Chick-fil-A’s grand opening in Lombard in March. The company wants to open its second Lake County store in Gurnee.

    Chick-fil-A wants a Gurnee store on village’s west side

    Chick-fil-A wants to expand its suburban footprint, this time in Gurnee. Chick-fil-A already has approval for its first Lake County store at Milwaukee Avenue and Route 60 in Vernon Hills.

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    Tri-Cities police reports
    Three bottles of tequila were stolen after someone broke into an apartment in the 800 block of Hill Avenue near Aurora between 7 a.m. and 4 p.m. Friday, according to a sheriff's report. Other items in the apartment, such as a flat-screen TV, were not taken.

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    Elgin-area police reports
    Justin I. Pawlarczyk, 25, of the 11N200 block of Romeo Drive in Elgin, appeared in bond court Monday on a felony theft charge, according to court documents. Pawlarczyk, an employee of the Meijer store at 815 S. Randall Road, is charged with taking $3,920 in cash from a register at the store's gas station, according to police reports. Bail was set at $5,000, of which Pawlarczyk must pay 10 percent...

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    Arif Mahmood

    DuPage forest preserve contractor denies charges in contract-rigging scandal

    The first of three men charged in a contract-rigging scandal at the DuPage County Forest Preserve District pleaded not guilty Monday, and his attorney said he plans to fight the charges. Arif Mahmood, 37, of Glendale Heights, was indicted earlier this month on 37 felony counts, including conspiracy, theft and accepting kickbacks.

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    Robert Dold

    Anti-gun group honors Dold, Quinn

    Anti-gun advocates have honored Gov. Pat Quinn and Congressman Bob Dold with awards for their leadership.

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    Joseph Moreno

    Indicted ex-commissioner negotiating plea deal

    An attorney for a former Cook County commissioner says his client is negotiating a possible plea deal with federal prosecutors in a bribery and kickback case.

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    Study shows 472 at UIUC earn $150,000-plus

    More than 470 employees at the University of Illinois' campus in Urbana-Champaign earn $150,000 or more annually, according to an analysis that shows salaries are edging higher after several years of hiring freezes, furloughs, retirements and budget woes.

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    John Kasik

    Attorney: Alcohol, depression may have set off Lisle volleyball parent

    A Lisle man accused of threatening to kill his daughters' volleyball coach may have been under the influence of alcohol and suffering from depression at the time, his attorney said. "He knows it shouldn't have happened," defense attorney Joseph DiNatale said of defendant John Kasik, 61.

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    Illinois Speaker of the House Michael Madigan, left, speaks with Illinois House Minority Leader Tom Cross on the House floor during session at the Illinois State Capitol last May.

    Powerful supermajorities elected to statehouses

    If you think the presidential election revealed the nation's political rifts, consider the outcomes in state legislatures.

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    Model airplane enthusiasts can buy permits beginning Dec. 3 to fly their crafts in select DuPage County forest preserves.

    Many forest preserve permits on sale beginning Dec. 3

    Annual permits for off-leash dog areas, private boating and model aircraft in DuPage County forest preserves will go on sale at 8 a.m. Dec. 3 in the visitors services offices the district's headquarters, 3S580 Naperville Road in Wheaton. The forest preserve district processes applications from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. weekdays. Individuals must apply in person and present proof of residency for DuPage...

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    Associated Press Gas prices are down, giving Thanksgiving week travelers a slight break.

    Gas prices good news for Thanksgiving drivers

    Just in time for Thanksgiving travel, gas prices are dipping across the Chicago area. Average gas prices in the Chicago area have fallen 4.2 cents per gallon in the past week to an average of $3.66 per gallon, reports ChicagoGasPrices.com. Gas prices in many suburbs have dropped even below that. Nationally, gas prices have fallen 3.2 cents per gallon to $3.43, according to the website.

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    Mike O'Donnell is joined by a group of children at a bazaar in Bamyan City. O'Donnell, an Army Reservist, is serving his third deployment overseas.

    DuPage prosecutor, Army major serves county and country

    When he's not in a DuPage County courtroom prosecuting felonies, Mike O'Donnell can be found in the Middle East serving his country. The 42-year-old Army veteran has been deployed three times in 10 years, including twice while holding down a job at the state's attorney's office. "I guess I just wanted to be a part of the long line of Americans who give back to the country through military...

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    Joseph Spitalli

    Darien man charged in slashing death of ex-girlfriend’s new boyfriend

    A Darien man accused of slashing the throat of his ex-girlfriend's new boyfriend was held without bail Monday on charges of aggravated kidnapping and first-degree murder. Joseph Spitalli, 34, is charged with the early Friday slaying of Teymur Huseynli, 31. Prosecutors said the killing happened as Spitalli's ex-girlfriend watched helplessly.

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    Candidate filing opens for February primaries

    Would-be candidates throughout the suburbs already are circulating petitions to vie for spots on municipal, school, park, library and township boards. And on Monday, Elgin, Hoffman Estates, Naperville, Schaumburg and other communities that could have a February primary begin their weeklong filing period for city councils and village boards. That’s just 13 days after the exhausting national...

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    Improvements are in the works for the intersection of Rollins Road and Route 83 in Round Lake Beach.

    Work to untangle Rollins Road/Route 83 nears

    Congestion at the intersection of Rollins Road and Route 83 in Round Lake Beach holds a special place. But nearly four years after the Lake County Department of Transportation initiated the Rollins Road Gateway study, visible evidence of the complicated $37 million project is about to surface. “That’s one of worst intersections in the county,” said Chuck Gleason, project manager...

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    Bower Elementary School officials and students cut a ribbon in an area that flooded four years ago. To prevent future flooding, the school district and county worked together to build a new berm between the DuPage River and the Warrenville school.

    New berm protects Warrenville’s Bower Elementary from flooding

    Four years after a storm sent the DuPage River spilling into Bower Elementary School in Warrenville, school and county officials teamed up to build a new berm to hold the river away from the school. The project is the beginning of work aimed at alleviating flooding in Warrenville.

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    Chuck West

    Change after the chaos in Kane coroner's office

    Documents from the Kane County sheriff's office's criminal investigation into former Coroner Chuck West paint a picture of a divided, unproductive office bordering on chaos in summer 2010 as he sought to find out who contacted authorities about allegations of criminal wrongdoing. Now, “(the office) has a whole different feel to it,” said Kane board member Mark Davoust.

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    Volunteer Angela Kibbe of Elgin greets Thanksgiving dinner organizer and chef Jeff Turner of “In the Neighborhood Deli” while serving desserts at the Hemmens Cultural Center late Thursday morning. This year the Elgin dinner has moved to First United Methodist Church.

    Thanksgiving in the Fox Valley: community dinners

    Free Thanksgiving dinners aren't just about helping the homeless or needy, according to Liz Eakins, executive director of Lazarus House. "We see our Thanksgiving dinner as a way for the community to come together and be with their neighbors," Eakins said.

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    Protesters rallied in Naperville earlier this year to voice opposition to proposed cuts in teacher pensions.

    Pension cuts could boost state’s Social Security costs

    Lawmakers are getting set to debate teachers’ and state workers’ retirements once again, but a consultant warned that 2010 benefit cuts for newly hired teachers and state employees could qualify those workers for Social Security at some point, which would prove costly to the state. “This is something that we need to watch,” the Teachers Retirement System spokesman said.

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    Circa 1940 postcard of General Electric complex in Fort Wane.

    Big GE complex in Fort Wayne faces unclear future

    By January, just 30 employees will remain at the General Electric campus that covers 1 million square feet and decades ago employed nearly 10,000 people making electric motors.The Journal Gazette reported Sunday that the site on the edge of Fort Wayne's reinvigorated downtown area is so large that GE officials are assessing what they have and what issues the aging buildings face.

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    Report: 13 in Berrios’ family with government jobs

    A published report says 13 members of Cook County Assessor Joe Berrios’ family work for the county or other government agencies. The Chicago Sun-Times reports the number was 15 but two retired. All 15 members of the family receive more than $1 million yearly in wages and pension payments.

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    Plane in fatal crash registered to Antioch man

    BURLINGTON, Wis. — Federal investigators are beginning their work to find out what caused the fatal crash of a small plane in southeastern Wisconsin. Two people were killed when the single-engine Grumman crashed in a cornfield while attempting a landing Sunday afternoon at the Burlington Airport. Federal Aviation Administration records show the plane is registered to a man from Antioch.

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    Wisconsin man missing after 2 months in Alaska

    Alaska State Troopers are searching for a missing 31-year-old survivalist from Wisconsin who set out alone in the Alaska wilderness in late September. Thomas Seibold of Three Lakes, Wis., is described as an experienced outdoorsman who works as an instructor at the Talking Drum Outdoor School.

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    Man dead in southern Illinois mining accident

    Work at a southern Illinois mine has been temporarily halted while authorities investigate a machinery accident that killed a 30-year-old employee this weekend. The accident happened early Saturday at the Willow Lake Mine, which is operated by a subsidiary of Peabody Energy Corp.

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    Senior Niko Morado helps out in a freshman physical education class at Larkin High School as part of the U-46 senior leader program.

    U-46 senior provide role models for freshmen

    While bullying dominates headlines about schools across the country, there are programs in local high schools that teach students to mentor and lead their peers. Senior leaders in the five high schools across Elgin Area School District U-46 are proving seniors and freshman can get along. "(Students) don’t want to put themselves out there, but leaders can overcome that,” one teacher...

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    From left, Jim Darby, 79, and partner Patrick Bora, 73, and Janean Watkins, 37, and partner Lakeesha Harris, 36, wait in line at the Cook County Office of Vital Records to obtain civil union licenses on June 1, 2011.

    Advocates say Illinois could approve gay marriage

    Emboldened by recent victories at the polls and what they see as rapidly shifting attitudes in favor of gay rights, supporters say Illinois is ready to become the next state to allow same-sex marriage — though they acknowledge it won't be easy, even with Democratic majorities in Springfield.

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    USMC Corporal Patrick Hood of Chicago, visits with his former teachers Jodi Hernandez, left, and Athena Lalaras at the Veterans Day breakfast and assembly Friday at MacArthur Middle School in Prospect Heights.

    Images: The Week In Pictures
    This edition of The Week In Pictures features Veterans Day celebrations around the suburbs and other fall events.

Sports

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    Monday’s girls gymnastics scoreboard
    Here are the varsity girls gymnastics results from Monday's events, as reported to the Daily Herald.

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    Monday’s girls bowling scoreboard
    Here are the varsity girls bowling results from Monday's events, as reported to the Daily Herald.

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    Monday’s girls basketball scoreboard
    Here are the results from Monday's varsity girls basketball results as reported to the Daily Herald.

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    Palatine’s Lauren Logan signs up for a softball future at Missouri-St. Louis.

    Kern, Logan to team up at Missouri-St. Louis

    Two of the top softball players in the Mid-Suburban League will be teammates and roommates a year from now in a new state. Wheeling center fielder Sara Kern and Palatine catcher/first baseman Lauren Logan took time last week to sign letters of intent to the University of St. Louis-Missouri Division II softball program.

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    The Glenbard North football team makes its entrance for a pep rally Tuesday in Carol Stream. The team will play Mt. Carmel Saturday in Champaign for the Class 8A State Championship.

    Panthers have ripping good time before state showdown

    Members of Glenbard North High School's football team walked into the Neal Hudson gymnasium holding large paper signs for Tuesday afternoon's pep rally, painted with the words "Fremd," "Stevenson," "Maine South" and "Loyola." It didn't take long for them to start ripping them to shreds, encouraged by a cheering student body. Then came the last sign — Mt. Carmel — signifying the 10-tiime state champion from Chicago and opponent Glenbard North will face in Saturday's Class 8A state championship game in Champaign.

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    Monday’s girls bowling scoreboard
    Here are the varsity girls bowling results from Monday's events, as reported to the Daily Herald.

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    Monday’s girls basketball scoreboard
    Here are the results from Monday's varsity girls basketball results as reported to the Daily Herald.

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    Monday’s boys basketball scoreboard
    Here are the results from xxxday's varsity boys basketball results as reported to the Daily Herald.

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    Bears wide receiver Brandon Marshall catches a 13-yard touchdown pass over San Francisco 49ers cornerback Chris Culliver during Monday’s third quarter in San Francisco.

    The magic goes missing for Marshall

    Working with backup quarterback Jason Campbell, who was making his first Bears start, wide receiver Brandon Marshall got off to a slow start but scored his eighth TD in the third quarter.

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    Boys basketball/Fox Valley roundup

    Westminster Christian 66, Faith Lutheran 34: Will Woodhouse had 19 points and Robert Kleczynski added 13 as the Warriors rolled to a season-opening win in their own tournament. Colin Brandon added 10 points for Westminster, which led 37-14 at halftime.Downers Grove North 56, Streamwood 47: Zack Harris had 13 points and Jacob Siewert added 10 to lead the Sabres in this loss at the Wheaton Academy tournament.Cary-Grove 51, Woodstock North 36: Tyler Szydlo scored 14 points and Steve Plazak added 11 as Cary-Grove won at the Hoops for Healing Tournament in Woodstock.Dundee-Crown 51, Newark 39: Dylan Kissack scored 19 points and had 13 rebounds to lead the Chargers to a win at the Sycamore tournament.

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    Bears quarterback Jason Campbell gets off the ground after being tackled in Monday’s second half in San Francisco.

    It’s all bad for Bears in 49ers’ rout

    For one backup quarterback, it was a first to remember. For the other, it was one to forget. None of the Bears will want to dwell on this one, a 32-7 loss to the 49ers that dropped them to 7-3, while boosting the winners to 7-2-1. The Bears' Jason Campbell, subbing for concussed Jay Cutler, was making his first NFL start in 15 months and his first start for the Bears.

  •  

    Kukec shoots Maine West to victory

    Tom Kukec canned six 3-pointers on his way to a game-high 22 points to help Maine West top North Shore Country Day 59-40 in boys basketball. Allante Bates (10 points) also scored in double figures for Maine West, which led 28-23 at the half but took command in the third quarter by outscoring its opposition 20-8.

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    Buffalo Grove’s Luke Potnick, center, battles for a rebound with Elgin’s Tanner Bednar, Malik Parham-Dunner and Eric Sedlack during their game at the Bison Classic Thanksgiving Tournament at Buffalo Grove High School Monday.

    Williams’ career-high 29 boost Elgin

    With only one returning starter and few players with any varsity experience, Elgin boys basketball coach Mike Sitter said his plan was to call a timeout three minutes into Monday's season opener, no matter the score, to make sure his players "had their legs underneath them." However, the mostly inexperienced Maroons opened the game too hot for their coach to consider stopping their momentum. Elgin nailed 9-of-10 first-quarter shot attempts, including 5-of-6 attempts from 3-point range, and the Maroons ballooned their lead as high as 23 points in the second quarter of an eventual 60-49 victory over host Buffalo Grove at the Bison Classic Thanksgiving Tournament.

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    Grading the Bears at San Francisco

    Grading the Bears at San Francisco

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    Glenbard South finds a way to catch Glenbard West

    Glenbard South coach Julie Fonda always preaches high-energy, up-tempo basketball. Two-plus quarters Monday was anything but that. "It was flat," Fonda said. "That's a perfection description for it." And then, Fonda's Raiders found a way. Down 10 midway through the third quarter, still trailing by 6 in the fourth, Glenbard South rallied past Glenbard West 42-39 at the Rachel Bach Memorial Tournament in Lombard.

  •  
    St. Charles East’s Ethan Griffiths is fouled by East Aurora’s Peetie Davis Monday at the Ron Johnson Thanksgiving Tournament in St. Charles.

    St. Charles E. blows out E. Aurora

    Even for a team that carries high hopes, the first half that St. Charles East's basketball team enjoyed in Monday night's season opener was through the roof. The Saints (1-0) blistered the nets for 50 points in the first 16 minutes on the way to a convincing 76-46 victory over East Aurora (0-1) in the opening round of the 54th annual St. Charles East/Ron Johnson Thanksgiving Tournament.

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    Maine South edges Libertyville

    Maine South 42, Libertyville 40: An 18-point fourth quarter by Libertyville nearly made up for a sluggish first half, but not quite in boys basketball season-opening tournament play at Maine West on Monday.The Wildcats had just 11 points at halftime, thanks in large part to a 3-point second quarter. During the late rally they got 3 3-pointers from Jack Lipp. Lipp finished with 10 points while Matt Varner led Libertyville with 17 points. Varner had 6 points in the big fourth quarter.Vernon Hills 55, Maine East 53: At Northridge Prep, Stephen Curry scored a game-high 22 points, including a 9-for-14 effort from the line, to lead Vernon Hills to the win. The Cougars also got 12 points from TJ Flis.Robby Nardini broke up a tied game with his game-winning bucket with 2.8 seconds in Northridge Prep’s “Battle At The Ridge” tournament in Niles.Lake Zurich 59, King 47: The Bears got double-figures from three players to open the season with a win.Ryan Roach led the way with 15 points while Brad Kruse and Mike Travlos added 13 points and 12 points, respectively. Will McClaughry had 9 points for Lake Zurich.Carmel 57, Crystal Lake Central 55: Carmel got double-figures from three players in the win. Nickai Poyser led the way with 16 points, followed by Cullen Barr with 13 points and Jack George with 10 points. Billy Kirby added 9 points for the Corsairs.Girls basketballVernon Hills 56, Lake Forest Academy 27: Lauren Webb had 16 points and Meri Bennett-Swanson added 12 points as Vernon Hills cruised to victory.The Cougars also got 9 points apiece from Sydney Smith and Brie Bahlmann.BowlingWauconda d. Grayslake Central: Wauconda got a balanced effort in a 2,453-2,176 victory.Cyndi Teuber led the way for the Bulldogs with a 514 for the three-game series. Katie Adkins turned in Grayslake Central’s best score with a 548.

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    Lakes' Kohler drains winner with assist from Clark

    Direll Clark is well-known as a sure-handed running back during the football season. Those sure hands come in handy on the basketball court, too. In the waning seconds of overtime, he lost the ball and still found a way to assist on the game-winning basket on Monday night. Jake Kohler got the ball from Clark and beat the buzzer as Lakes edged Barrington 61-59 in the opening game of the Mundelein/Warren boys Thanksgiving tournament at Mundelein. It was the first season-opening victory for the Eagles since 2007.

  •  
    San Francisco 49ers outside linebacker Aldon Smith, obscured, and defensive end Justin Smith sack Bears quarterback Jason Campbell in Monday’s first quarter in San Francisco.

    Bears collapse in San Francisco

    SAN FRANCISCO — Colin Kaepernick passed for 243 yards and two touchdowns in his first career start in place of the injured Alex Smith, and the San Francisco 49ers whipped the Bears 32-7 on Monday night in a highly touted NFC showdown that hardly lived up to the hype. Kaepernick threw touchdown passes to Vernon Davis and Michael Crabtree, and Kendall Hunter ran for a 14-yard TD as San Francisco (7-2-1) jumped out to a big lead by scoring on each of its first four possessions — with Aldon Smith wreaking havoc on the other side of the ball with five sacks.The 7-3 Bears’ Jason Campbell, the other quarterback in this matchup of backups for two division leaders, threw a 13-yard touchdown pass to Brandon Marshall in the third quarter but was sacked five times and threw two interceptions in his first start since October 2011 for Oakland.

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    Sean O’Mara of Benet Academy is fouled, as he goes up for a shot, by Derek Westman of Naperville North during the “Hoops for Healing” boys basketball tournament, Monday in Naperville.

    O’Mara, Benet make the transition

    On Saturday night Sean O'Mara served as the starting left tackle in Benet's Class 7A semifinal loss to Lincoln-Way East. Within 48 hours O'Mara transformed into a high-profile 6-foot-9 junior center as if he'd been practicing with his team all along. With one practice under his belt, O'Mara nailed all six of his shots in the opening 10 minutes to stake Benet to a healthy lead that became a 47-39 victory over Naperville North in the opening round of the Hoops For Healing tournament on the Huskies' home floor.

  •  
    Chicago Bears quarterback Jason Campbell is sacked by San Francisco 49ers linebacker Aldon Smith, bottom, as defensive tackle Justin Smith converges during the first quarter.

    Images: Bears vs. 49ers
    The Chicago Bears traveled to San Francisco to face the 49ers on Monday, November 19th. The Bears lost 32-7.

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    Andrews sisters lead Huntley by South Elgin

    Most freshmen who start on a varsity team in their first year of high school basketball take a little while to get acclimated to the speed of the varsity game. Huntley's Ali Andrews is already proving to be anything but the typical freshman. Andrews had another sparkling effort Monday night, scoring a game-high 21 points to go along with 4 assists and 3 blocked shots as the Red Raiders rolled to a 56-34 win over South Elgin in the Dundee-Crown Thanksgiving Tournament.

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    Gorney, Huntley make season opener a success

    Huntley junior Zach Gorney had the jitters jolted right out of him just 28 seconds into his boys basketball varsity debut Monday night at Prairie Ridge. "That helped me get more in the flow," the 6-foot-4 Gorney said with a smile of drawing a charging foul on Antioch in Crystal Lake Central's sixth annual Coaches vs. Cancer Tournament. By the time Gorney drew his second charge with 2:44 to play, he was nearly finished with a double-double of 14 points and 10 rebounds as the Red Raiders pulled away in the final 7½ minutes to a 55-39 victory in the season opener for both teams.

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    Geneva’s Navigato debuts with buzzer-beater

    Nate Navigato will long remember his first varsity basketball game. The Geneva sophomore, making his debut at the Wildcat Turkey Classic boys basketball tournament in West Chicago, hit an eight-foot right-baseline jumper with a second remaining to give the Vikings a 44-42 victory over Marmion in the schools' season opener Monday evening.

  •  

    Larkin holds off Belvidere

    First, Larkin's boys basketball team was cruising with a double-digit lead. Just like that, the Royals lost it. And just like that, they had it back again. They wound up just above the double-digit barrier with a 75-64 win against Belvidere in the Hoops for Healing Tournament at Woodstock Monday night. Larkin's Quantice Hunter led all scorers with 24 points in the season opener for both teams.

  •  
    Harvest Christian’s John Vislisel is defended by St. Edward’s John Butzow left, and Adrian Ponce Monday at the Westminster Christian Warrior Thanksgiving Basketball Classic in Elgin.

    St. Edward’s depth does in Harvest Christian

    While the St. Edward boys basketball team has some depth this season, Adrian Ponce knows he needs to stay on the court. The senior, one of only three seniors on the roster, missed several minutes of the second quarter and most of the third Monday because of foul trouble. The Green Wave got a big lift from Danny Favela in Ponce's absence in its 58-36 victory over Harvest Christian in the opening game of the 6th annual Westminster Christian Thanksgiving Classic.

  •  
    Stevenson’s Connor Cashaw, left, drives on Grayslake Central’s Matt Spalding at the Bison Classic Thanksgiving Tournament held at Buffalo Grove on Monday.

    Taylor, Stevenson settle down in winning opener

    First-game jitters exist regardless if you're a player or coach — just ask John Taylor. A starting guard on Stevenson's 2007 fourth-place state finisher, Taylor stepped in Monday as acting coach for Stevenson head coach Pat Ambrose, who was away due to a death in the family. "Everyone is nervous, whether you're a player or coach," Taylor said. "Especially without your boss here." But with a trio of standout guards leading the way, those nerves subsided rather quickly as Stevenson got out to an 18-0 lead while handling Grayslake Central 76-50 in the opening game of the Bison Classic at Buffalo Grove.

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    New-look Prospect passes first test

    Prospect had a lot of questions coming into its boys basketball season opener against Highland Park. Where would the offense come after losing 90 percent of its scoring via graduation? How would the Knights fare without leading returning scorer Devin O'Hara, who is slated to miss the first few games with an ankle injury? And how would their up-tempo offense adjust to Highland Park's zone trapping? It's only the season opener, but they might've found answers to all three of those questions on Tuesday night. Prospect Junior guard Bobby Frasco's 16 points (2 rebounds, 2 assists) led the Knights to a 46-39 win against Highland Park at the Joe Majkowski Varsity Thanksgiving Basketball Tournament at St. Viator.

  •  
    Glenbard North’s Mariah Matesi performs her 4th place floor exercise during the girls state gymnastics finals.

    Scouting DuPage County girls gymnastics

    A look at the top teams and top girls gymnasts in DuPage County this winter.

  •  

    It clicks for Conrad at MSL’s new home

    Mid Suburban League girls bowling meets had been held at AMF Rolling Meadows Lanes for as long as anyone could remember — at least 20 years, and probably quite a bit more. So when Palatine junior Katie Conrad learned there would be change in venue this season due to the closing of AMF, she decided not to leave anything to chance. "I practiced here about four or five times a week over the summer," said Conrad of Arlington Lanes, the MSL's new home in Arlington Heights. All the extra preparation paid off as the junior fired a 602 series — the second best score of the night — including a 212 game right out of the box.

  •  
    Coach Tom Thibodeau and the Bulls are still trying to figure some things out after 10 games.

    Ugly start, but Bulls have been through this before
    Bulls fans have become used to phenomenal success the past two years with coach Tom Thibodeau. So it's easy to forget that Thibodeau's first season featured many of the same early rough spots that have been on display this month.

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    Early spring training for White Sox

    The World Baseball Classic is back on the schedule in 2013, so spring training is opening earlier. White Sox pitchers and catchers report to camp on Feb. 12, with position players due in on Feb. 17.

  •  
    Ashley Puff, pictured on the floor exercise at the state meet, returns as the captain in her senior year at Geneva.

    Scouting Tri-Cities girls gymnastics

    Preview of 2012-13 Tri-Cities girls gymnastics season.

  •  
    Big Ten Commissioner Jim Delany said demographics were a huge part of the decision to add Maryland to the conference. The population shift in Midwest has hampered the Big Ten’s ability to recruit.

    Demographics, money key to Big Ten-Maryland union

    Maryland is joining the Big Ten, leaving the Atlantic Coast Conference in a shocker of a move in the world of conference realignment that was driven by the school's budget woes. The announcement came Monday at a news conference with school President Wallace D. Loh, Big Ten Commissioner Jim Delany and athletic director Kevin Anderson."The membership of the Big Ten enables us to guarantee the financial sustainability of Maryland athletics for a long, long, long time," Loh said.Loh added that Maryland athletics has been living "paycheck to paycheck." The school had eliminated seven sports programs earlier this year.Delaney said two key factors (a larger demographic and a larger recruiting base) were important to the conference as well.

  •  
    Chicago Fire defender Austin Berry, right, has earned Rookie of the Year honors in the MLS for the 2012 season.

    Berry, Pause win MLS awards

    The Chicago Fire made an early exit from the MLS playoffs this season, but it isn't heading into the off-season empty handed. MLS announced Monday that central defender Austin Berry has been named the league's Rookie of the Year and captain Logan Pause won the Individual Fair Play Award.

  •  
    Cubs relief pitcher Shawn Camp carried a big load for the Cubs last season, appearing in 80 games. Opponents batted only .261 against him and he had a WHIP of 1.29. The Cubs re-signed Camp to a new one-year deal on Monday.

    Cubs re-sign reliever Shawn Camp

    The Cubs on Monday re-signed right-handed reliever Shawn Camp to a one-year contract worth $1.35 million with additional incentives worth up to $200,000. The hard-working Camp tied for the major-league lead in appearances this past season, with 80.

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    Mike North video: Notre Dame vs. Anyone

    Notre Dame needs to win, according to Mike North, because he doesn't want two SEC teams in the championship game. He also wonders why other people think Alabama should be ranked #2 this week.

  •  
    Baltimore Ravens quarterback Joe Flacco (5) passes in the second quarter against the Pittsburgh Steelers in Pittsburgh, Sunday. The Ravens won 13-10.

    Ravens shut down Leftwich, Steelers 13-10

    PITTSBURGH — The Baltimore Ravens shut down Byron Leftwich, and Jacoby Jones supplied the offense they needed to grab control of the AFC North.Jones returned a punt for a touchdown, Justin Tucker kicked two field goals and Baltimore beat the Pittsburgh Steelers 13-10 on Sunday night in another slugfest between two of the NFL’s biggest rivals.The Ravens (8-2) moved two games in front of the Steelers (6-4) by shutting down Pittsburgh’s offense, which sputtered without injured quarterback Ben Roethlisberger.Leftwich, making his first start in more than three years, completed 18 of 39 passes for 201 yards and an interception. He ran for a score but was also sacked three times.Baltimore’s Joe Flacco wasn’t much better, completing 20 of 32 passes for 164 yards, but the Ravens didn’t need Flacco to dominate to beat the Steelers for the third straight time at Heinz Field.The Steelers fell to 0-5 against the Ravens since 2005 when Roethlisberger doesn’t start. The two-time Super Bowl winner is out indefinitely with a sprained right shoulder and a dislocated rib.Leftwich was looking for his first win as a starter since Oct. 8, 2008, a span of 2,234 days. He’ll have to wait at least seven more after the Ravens pounded him relentlessly in the second half.The 32-year-old Leftwich took a series of shots, none more painful than a blindside sack by James Ihedigbo that forced Pittsburgh doctors to check him out for a rib injury.Baltimore’s offense struggled against the NFL’s No. 1 ranked defense. Ray Rice finished with just 40 yards on 20 carries but it didn’t matter.The Ravens ran out most of the final 4:33 behind Rice and a pair of Pittsburgh penalties. The Steelers could do little to stop the clock after Leftwich burned two timeouts in the span of two plays during a late third quarter drive.

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    Minnesota’s leading receiver Barker quits in email rant

    MINNEAPOLIS — Minnesota receiver A.J. Barker quit the team Sunday in a blistering email to coach Jerry Kill that he subsequently made public through his personal blog, the messy fallout triggered by their conflict about the treatment of the junior’s sprained right ankle.Barker confirmed his decision to depart the Gophers in a phone interview, shortly after he posted the rambling, accusatory and occasionally profane message of more than 4,100 words on his website at ajbarker82.tumblr.com. Barker is a walk-on who has 30 receptions for 577 yards and seven touchdowns in eight games, by far the most on the team.Kill made no mention of Barker’s decision earlier Sunday in his regular media availability. He wasn’t available for further comment. In a statement distributed later by the university, athletic director Norwood Teague said Kill tried responding to Barker after receiving his email but was unable to connect with the player.“We understand A.J.’s frustration with his injury, and we regret that he has chosen to leave the team on these terms,” Teague said.Barker was hurt at the end of the Oct. 27 game against Purdue, and he said he aggravated the injury on the field before the Gophers played Michigan on Nov. 3. What was a minor sprain worsened when he felt a cracking sensation in the joint, and he experienced little progress the last two weeks.Barker said he was forced to practice by Kill last Tuesday, but he was unable to get through warm-ups. An MRI test the next day revealed ligament tears and a bone bruise above his heel, he said.Then last Thursday, according to Barker, Kill blew up at him in front of the team, claiming he wasn’t listening to the athletic trainers or working hard enough on his rehabilitation and yelling that he’d never play for the Gophers again or get a scholarship.“You demeaned me to a point of no return. You took the one thing you had a say in (my football playing career and my future) and you held it against me in an attempt to break me,” Barker wrote.Minnesota is 6-5 this season, Kill’s second here after arriving from Northern Illinois, and 2-5 in the Big Ten. Barker said he’s pained by the reality he’ll never play for his hometown school again. The St. Paul native, a star at De La Salle High School in Minneapolis, had only one catch combined over his first two seasons until emerging as the team’s best downfield threat this fall.But just like that, he’s gone.Barker said he intended to tell Kill in person but was too nervous. He said he’s not concerned about what people think of his delivery method or tone.“It’s been so encouraging to hear the support from my teammates. And those who don’t support me, I’m probably not going to hear from anyway,” Barker said, adding: “At the end of the day, I’m very comfortable with myself.”Barker said Kill’s screaming session last week was his breaking point but that he overlooked some interactions with the coaches over the last year and a half, including verbal abuse from a couple of assistants and what he called generally a “cycle of manipulation.”But on the phone, Barker acknowledged his anger was with the nature of his sport at this level as much as Kill and his staff. Without a scholarship, he has carried an obvious chip on his shoulder. And he said Sunday he wants to become a coach eventually so he can “right these wrongs.”“The reality of the situation is college football is a dictatorship. Coaches are making a subjective evaluation about who is good enough to get a scholarship and who gets to play,” Barker said.Barker’s brother, Ross, tried to walk on at Wisconsin this season but was prevented from playing because of a heart problem. Barker said he’ll consider all Big Ten schools if they’ll take him and believes as an un-recruited walk-on he’ll be able to play immediately and not have to sit out for a season.

Business

  •  
    Range Resources site manager Don Robinson stands near the well head by the drill that goes into the shale at a well site in Washington, Pa.

    Gas drilling decisions loom on political horizon

    Energy companies, environmental groups, and even Hollywood stars are watching to see what decisions President Barack Obama makes about regulating or promoting natural gas drilling.The stakes are huge. Business leaders don't want government regulations to slow the flow of hundreds of billions of dollars of clean, cheap domestic energy over the next few decades. Environmental groups see that same tide as a potential threat.

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    This site at Route 72 and Commonwealth Drive in East Dundee could house Insurance Auto Auctions, a business that auctions off salvaged vehicles. But neighbors across the border in Barrington Hills say they are worried that fluids coming from the vehicles will pollute the local water supply. They have mounted a campaign against the plan and recruited East Dundee residents to join them.

    Barrington Hills, East Dundee clash over auto auction business

    The village of Barrington Hills and a citizens group have launched a campaign against Insurance Auto Auctions, which hopes to build a car storage and auction site in East Dundee, amid fears fear the business will pollute the local water supply with toxic fluids from leaky vehicles. But an East Dundee official accuses Barrington Hills of "significant fear mongering" and "all kinds of craziness."

  •  
    Walmart shoppers’ reaction to proposed worker protests outside stores this week is in question.

    Wal-Mart shoppers seen overrunning Black Friday union protests

    Wal-Mart Stores workers demanding better pay and benefits vow to mount 1,000 protests online and outside stores up to and including Black Friday. The strategy risks showing the company's strength not vulnerability.

  •  
    All the Hostess cakes and snacks are sold out at the Wonder Bread Bakery Outlet Friday in Waterloo, Iowa.

    Hostess lives another day to mediate with union

    Hostess Brands Inc. and its second largest union agreed on Monday to go into mediation to try to resolve their differences after a bankruptcy court judge concluded that the parties hadn't gone through the critical step. That means the maker of Twinkies won't go out of business yet.

  •  
    Intel president and CEO Paul Otellini plans to retire in May 2013 after nearly 40 years with the company. Intel’s board will look at company executives as well as external candidates to replace Otellini, and on Monday promoted three executives to executive vice president.

    Intel CEO Paul Otellini to retire in surprise move

    Intel CEO Paul Otellini is retiring in May, giving the world's largest maker of microprocessors six months to find a new leader as it confronts two major challenges: a shaky economy and a shift toward mobile devices that is reducing demand for its PC chips.

  •  
    President Barack Obama acknowledges House Speaker John Boehner while speaking to reporters in the Roosevelt Room of the White House in Washington on Nov. 16. U.S. stocks shook off their post-election slump Monday and recorded big gains as investors appeared more optimistic about a deal to avoid a federal budget crisis and were encouraged by a pair of corporate earnings reports. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

    US stocks rise on hopes for budget deal, Europe

    The stock market finally shook its post-election slump.Investors seized on hope that Washington will reach a deal on the federal budget and drove stocks to their biggest gain in two months. A pair of strong corporate earnings reports also helped.

  •  
    Twinkies first came onto the scene in 1930 and contained real fruit until rationing during World War II led to the vanilla cream Twinkie.

    Twinkies, Wonder Bread carry on in Canada post Hostess filing

    Twinkie and Wonder Bread lovers in the U.S. can still head north of the border to stock up on the baked goods even with the bankruptcy of Hostess Brands Inc.

  •  
    More than 309,000 borrowers nationwide received some form of mortgage relief between March 1 and Sept. 30, according to a report issued Monday by Joseph Smith, monitor of the landmark mortgage settlement with the five major U.S. banks.

    5 big US banks have cut mortgage balances by $6 billion

    Five of the biggest U.S. banks have cut struggling homeowners' mortgage balances by $6.3 billion, part of a total $26.1 billion in home loan relief provided under a landmark settlement over foreclosure abuses.

  •  
    Gregory Wasson, right, president and chief executive officer of Walgreen Co., saw his total compensation slip in fiscal 2012, as earnings sank 21 percent and a contract dispute hurt revenue for the nation’s largest drugstore operator.

    Walgreen CEO compensation slips in fiscal 2012

    Walgreen CEO Gregory D. Wasson's total compensation slipped in fiscal 2012, as earnings sank 21 percent and a contract dispute hurt revenue for the nation's largest drugstore operator.

  •  
    The iPad mini is one of Apple’s newest products. The device boasts a 7.9-inch screen diagonally, compared with the 9.7-inch screen of the current iPad.

    Apple climbs; Topeka calls share sell-off ‘insane’

    Shares of Apple jumped nearly 6 percent Monday, with one analyst calling a two-month sell-off in shares of the most valuable company on earth "insanely insane."

  •  
    Shark expert Allison Perry of Oceana Europe works on her computer outside the conference for the 18th meeting of the International Commission for the Conservation of Atlantic Tuna in Agadir, Morocco, which declined to put in new protections for endangered shark populations on Monday. Member nations of the fisheries group did agree to maintain strict quotas to stop overfishing of severely depleted bluefin tuna stocks.

    Fishing nations maintain tuna quotas

    Fishing countries on Monday voted to keep up strict limits on catching Atlantic Bluefin tuna, overruling fierce opposition from critics who argue that the key sushi ingredient is on the rebound.

  •  

    U.S. home sales rise 2.1 percent in October

    U.S. sales of previously occupied homes rose solidly in October, helped by improvement in the job market and record-low mortgage rates. The increase along with a jump in homebuilder confidence this month suggests the housing market continues to recover. The National Association of Realtors said Monday that sales rose 2.1 percent to a seasonally adjusted annual rate of 4.79 million. That's up from 4.69 million in September, which was revised lower.

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    U.S. homebuilder confidence at 6-year high

    LOS ANGELES — Confidence among U.S. homebuilders rose this month to its highest level in six and a half years, driven by strong demand for newly built homes and growing optimism that the housing recovery will strengthen next year.The National Association of Home Builders/Wells Fargo builder sentiment index increased to 46, up from 41 in October. That’s the highest reading since May 2006, just before the housing bubble burst.Readings below 50 suggest negative sentiment about the housing market. The index last reached that level in April 2006. Still it has been trending higher since October 2011, when it stood at 17.A measure of current sales conditions rose this month by 8 points to 49, the highest level since May 2006.The survey is based on responses from 417 builders.

  •  
    Govenor Pat Quinn.

    Quinn launches website in pensions campaign

    Gov. Pat Quinn launched a website Sunday outlining a brief history of public pensions, its fiscal problems and ways to discuss solutions through social media, part of the Chicago Democrat's long-awaited campaign to build public support for an overhaul of Illinois' underfunded pension system.

  •  
    Women check an electronic stock indicator in Tokyo, Monday,

    U.S. budget hopes shore up markets

    Optimism over the progress of crucial U.S. budget talks combined with hopes that Greece will finally get its next batch of bailout cash to shore up markets Monday in spite of concerns over the fighting in the Middle East.The advance followed a rebound late Friday amid signs that President Barack Obama and leaders of Congress were making headway in their efforts to agree a budget deal by the end of the year.

  •  

    Lowe’s 3Q net income climbs on fewer charges

    Lowe's third-quarter net income surged 76 percent, helped by fewer charges and higher revenue. The home improvement retailer also reaffirmed its full-year forecast. Its adjusted earnings without charges and its revenue both beat Wall Street forecasts. Its shares rose 5 percent in early premarket trading Monday.

  •  

    Cisco Systems to buy Meraki for $1.2 billion

    Cisco Systems Inc., the world's largest maker of computer networking gear, said Sunday it is buying Meraki for $1.2 billion to expand its ability to let customers compute in the cloud.Cloud computing refers to the increasingly popular practice of storing software applications in remote data centers that are accessed over the Internet instead of installing programs on individual machines.

  •  

    Oil rises as Israel-Hamas fight continues

    The price of oil rose to nearly $88 a barrel Monday in Asia as the conflict between Israel and Hamas showed no signs of abating, raising concerns about crude supplies. Benchmark oil for December delivery was up 95 cents to $87.87 per barrel at late afternoon Bangkok time in electronic trading on the New York Mercantile Exchange. The contract added $1.05 to finish at $86.92 per barrel on Friday.

  •  

    Son of Madoff’s accountant kills himself in Ohio

    The son of Bernard Madoff's longtime accountant, who himself pleaded guilty to securities fraud in the scandal centered on the disgraced financier, has committed suicide in central Ohio, authorities said.Jeremy Friehling, 23, was found dead at his apartment of a self-inflicted gunshot wound Thursday in Columbus, where he was a second-year student at Ohio State's medical school, police there said.

  •  
    In the two weeks since Maine voters approved a law allowing same-sex marriage, Clay Hill Farm has been getting phone calls and emails from gay couples inquiring about open dates and wedding packages at the restaurant and wildlife sanctuary, a popular wedding spot in York.

    Wedding trade expects boost from gay-marriage laws

    In the two weeks since Maine voters approved a law allowing same-sex marriage, Clay Hill Farm has been getting phone calls and emails from gay couples inquiring about open dates and wedding packages at the restaurant and wildlife sanctuary, a popular wedding spot in York. The law won't go into effect for more than six weeks, but already couples from in and out of state have called, said Jennifer Lewis-McShera, who heads the wedding department there.

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    Police officers detain a protester outside the Kremlin-loyal NTV television station in Moscow. Russian opposition and human rights groups on Monday, Nov. 19, 2012, urged Western consumer products giants to stop “financing politically motivated persecution” by advertising on a Kremlin-friendly TV network known for its biased coverage of government critics and demonstrations against President Vladimir Putin.

    Kremlin critics: Stop ads on pro-Putin TV channel

    Russian opposition and human rights groups on Monday urged Western consumer products giants to stop "financing politically motivated persecution" by advertising on a Kremlin-friendly TV network known for its biased coverage of government critics and demonstrations against President Vladimir Putin.

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    Peter Struck, Associate Professor of Classical Studies at the University of Pennsylvania prepares to record a lecture on Greek Mythology in Philadelphia.

    New frontier for scaling up online classes: credit

    In 15 years of teaching, University of Pennsylvania classicist Peter Struck has guided perhaps a few hundred students annually in his classes on Greek and Roman mythology through the works of Homer, Sophocles, Aeschylus and others — "the oldest strands of our cultural DNA."

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    House Speaker John Boehner of Ohio gesturing during a news conference on Capitol Hill in Washington. It’s entirely possible that lawmakers and the White House will reach a deal to avert an avalanche of tax increases and deep cuts in government programs before a Jan. 1 deadline.

    Fiscal cliff negotiators are facing high hurdles

    It's entirely possible that lawmakers and the White House will reach a deal that staves off an avalanche of tax increases and deep cuts in government programs before a Jan. 1 deadline. To do so, however, they'll have to resolve deep political and fiscal disagreements that have stymied them time after time despite repeated promises to overcome them.

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    In the six years since the last major video game system launched, Apple unveiled the iPhone and the iPad, “Angry Birds” invaded smartphones and Facebook reached a billion users.

    Wii U: New console launches in a sea of gadgets

    In the six years since the last major video game system launched, Apple unveiled the iPhone and the iPad, "Angry Birds" invaded smartphones and Facebook reached a billion users. In the process, scores of video game consoles were left to languish in living rooms alongside dusty VCRs and disc players.

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    Americans cranked up their use of credit cards in the third quarter, racking up more debt than a year ago, while also being less diligent about making payments on time, an analysis of consumer-credit data shows.

    Average US credit card debt per borrower up in 3Q
    Americans cranked up their use of credit cards in the third quarter, racking up more debt than a year ago, while also being less diligent about making payments on time, an analysis of consumer-credit data shows.The average credit card debt per borrower in the U.S. grew 4.9 percent in the July-to-September period from a year earlier to $4,996, credit reporting agency TransUnion said Monday.

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    Facets if Isis in Palatine offers an array of beads and classes in Palatine. Owner Vilma Lee-Heinzinger left her corporate job more than six years ago to start the business.

    Facets of Isis offers array of beads, classes in Palatine

    When the owner of a bead store in Palatine was young, what she treasured most was her box of 64 color crayons and Aladdin coloring book. This is where her obsession with playing with colors and drawing pretty baubles began. We talk to her about her business.

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    Is being a franchisee better than being independent?

    Can you make more money investing in your own business rather than in a franchise? Small Business Columnist Jim Kendall explores this issue.

Life & Entertainment

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    Do you know how many pounds of cranberries Americans eat each year?

    Thanksgiving trivia and tips

    Don't let the table talk this Thanksgiving turn to the recent Washington sex scandal or the state's pension reform woes (sure to make you sleepier than three helpings of turkey). Keep things lively with some Thanksgiving trivia.

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    Actor Sir Patrick Stewart, posing with the insignia of his knighthood in 2010, will be a co-host for “The Second City Guide to the Opera” at the Lyric Opera of Chicago on Jan. 5.

    Stewart beams aboard Lyric, Second City collaboration

    Patrick Stewart ("X-Men," "Star Trek: The Next Generation") has been announced as a co-host to "The Second City Guide to the Opera," which also stars American soprano Renée Fleming at the Lyric Opera of Chicago. The one-night-only performance is scheduled for Saturday, Jan. 5.

  •  

    Cornbread Stuffing Mushrooms
    8 large portobello mushroom capsSalt and ground black pepper2 tablespoons unsalted butter1 small yellow onion, chopped1 medium leek, green and white parts, sliced1 medium carrot, grated1 celery rib, finely diced1 tablespoon chopped fresh thyme2 teaspoons chopped fresh rosemary2 cups diced cornbreadVegetable broth, as neededHeat the oven to 350 degrees.Arrange the mushrooms on a rimmed baking sheet, gill sides up. Sprinkle with salt and pepper, then roast for 15 minutes.Meanwhile, in a large skillet over medium-high heat, melt the butter. Add the onion and leek and saute until tender, about 7 to 8 minutes. Add the carrot, celery, thyme and rosemary and cook until tender, about another 5 minutes. Remove the pan from the heat and gently fold in the cornbread.When the mushrooms are done, pour any liquid that has collected on the rimmed baking sheet into the cornbread mixture. If the mixture is dry, sprinkle in a bit of vegetable broth. Gently mix. Spoon the mixture into the mushroom caps and return to the oven. Bake 20 minutes, or until lightly browned on top.Serves eight.Nutrition values per serving: 180 calories, 6 g fat (2.5 g saturated), 27 g carbohydrates, 3 g fiber, 5 g protein, 25 mg cholesterol, 430 mg sodium.Alison Ladman for The Associated Press

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    You won’t miss turkey with hearty fare like red bell pepper and apple slaw, flax rolls, roasted vegetable quiche, corn bread stuffing mushrooms and squash bisque on the Thanksgiving table.

    Thanksgiving sans turkey not necessarily lacking

    Once you've taken the obligatory slice of turkey, a dutiful spoonful of gravy and maybe haggled a bit over the dark meat, what you really want is more stuffing. More mashed anything. And definitely more pie. "Absence of turkey can be a very positive thing," says New York Times food columnist Mark Bittman, whose upcoming book is dedicated to learning to make do with less meat.

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    You won’t miss turkey with hearty fare like red bell pepper and apple slaw, flax rolls, roasted vegetable quiche, corn bread stuffing mushrooms and squash bisque and lemon pecan mousse cake on the Thanksgiving table.

    Lemon Pecan Mousse Cake
    Lemon Pecan Mousse Cake

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    You won’t miss turkey with hearty fare like red bell pepper and apple slaw, flax rolls, roasted vegetable quiche, corn bread stuffing mushrooms and squash bisque on the Thanksgiving table.

    Squash Bisque Roasted Corn Salsa
    Squash Bisque with Roasted Corn Salsa

  •  
    Red bell pepper and apple slaw (also called Celebration Slaw) provides a colorful dish for your holiday table.

    Bell Pepper and Apple Slaw
    Red Pepper and Apple Slaw

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    You won’t miss turkey with hearty fare like red bell pepper and apple slaw, flax rolls, roasted vegetable quiche, cornbread stuffing mushrooms and squash bisque on the Thanksgiving table.

    Roasted Vegetable Quiche
    Roasted Vegetable Quiche

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    You won’t miss turkey with hearty fare like red bell pepper and apple slaw, flax rolls, roasted vegetable quiche, corn bread stuffing mushrooms and squash bisque and lemon pecan mousse cake on the Thanksgiving table.

    No-Knead Flax Rolls
    No Knead Flax Rolls

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    Annie Overboe’s Apple Galette comes together quickly and bakes into a beautiful dessert to cap the Thanksgiving feast.

    Apple Galette
    Apple Galette

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    Bret Michaels brings his bombastic brand of rock to the Arcada Theatre in St. Charles on Friday, Nov. 23.

    Music notes: Bret Michaels rocks the Arcada

    Bret Michaels — former leader of ’80s metal band Poison and current reality show star — will bring his loud, swaggering, bombastic rock attack to the Arcada in St. Charles Friday, Nov. 23. If rockin’ country sounds are your thing, you’ll do no better this weekend than the Ha Ha Tonka show at Chicago’s Subterranean.

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    Annie Overboe’s Apple Galette comes together quickly and bakes into a beautiful dessert to cap the Thanksgiving feast.

    Rustic galette embodies Thanksgiving spirit

    Over the years Annie Overboe has crafted Thanksgiving desserts ranging from wildly zesty cranberry tarts to pumpkin-spiced trifles. Yet her guests overwhelming choose homemade pies. If you get the jitters over making homemade pie, try Annie's Rustic Apple Galette with a no-fuss crust that comes together in a food processor.

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    AC/DC lead singer Brian Johnson, left, and Angus Young perform on the Black Ice tour at Madison Square Garden in New York. Columbia Records and Apple announced Monday that the classic rock band’s music will be available at the iTunes Store worldwide.

    AC/DC releases music catalog on iTunes

    AC/DC is finally releasing its music digitally on iTunes. Columbia Records and Apple announced Monday that the classic rock band's music will be available at the iTunes Store worldwide. Sixteen studio albums will be released, including "High Voltage" and "Back in Black."

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    As a kid, Chris Pine used to be afraid of the bogeyman. Now he fights one on the big screen as Jack Frost in “Rise of the Guardians.”

    Chris Pine on Jack Frost, Jack Ryan, the bogeyman

    As a kid, Chris Pine used to be afraid of the bogeyman. Now he fights one on the big screen. The 32-year-old American actor is taking on his first voice-over role as Jack Frost in Dreamworks animated film "Rise of the Guardians." His winter wonderland character is asked to join Santa, the Easter Bunny and the Tooth Fairy — played by Alec Baldwin, Hugh Jackman and Isla Fisher — to defeat a bogeyman called Pitch (Jude Law).

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    KIds will have a chance to visit with Santa Claus during Holly Days in Egg Harbor, Wis.

    On the road: A season for holiday markets

    Pencil in a visit to Wisconsin's scenic Door County during Holly Days in Egg Harbor, Wis. Have breakfast with Santa, hunt for elves, enter the Mistle Dough shopping contest, watch the tree lighting and a holiday performance at the Third Avenue Playhouse and enjoy caroling and horse-drawn wagon rides. Also, check out the Christkindlmarket Chicago in Daley Plaza that brings the best of German holiday traditions to the Midwest.

  •  

    Energy-drinking soldiers unusually sleepy

    U.S. service members in Afghanistan battle zones who consumed three or more caffeine-charged energy drinks a day were prone to sleepiness and dozing off while on guard duty, according to a report.

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    U.S. sees increase in suicides during recession

    The suicide rate in the U.S. increased during the recession, a sign that rising joblessness took a toll on Americans' mental health, researchers said. About 1,580 additional suicides occurred annually in the U.S. from 2008 to 2010 than would have been expected based on statistical trends before the recession, according to a letter published in the Lancet journal.

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    Sitting for long periods of time can hurt your back and impact your overall health.

    Your health: Time to stand up
    Learn why too much sitting isn't good for you, and how men can do a few simple things to improve their overall health.

  •  

    New 3-D test helps in screening women with dense breasts

    Many women didn't know that having dense breasts is a well-known risk factor for breast cancer. Dense tissue also makes it more difficult for doctors to detect tumors on mammogram images. Such women may need specialized tests such as breast MRI or ultrasound as part of their screening. Now a new 3-D mammography may do a better job of detecting cancer than conventional mammography.

  •  

    Insomnia may increase risk of heart attack, stroke

    Sleep difficulties, a problem for as many as 70 million Americans, can double one's risk of heart attack or stroke, according to a study. The findings add to previous research showing not enough sleep can contribute to high blood pressure and waking too early may raise heart risks.

  •  

    High-fiber diet for diverticular disease can include seeds

    I no longer advise patients with diverticular disease to avoid these foods involving seeds and nuts. They are all good sources of fiber. Several large studies indicate that people who have high-fiber diets for many years are less likely to develop diverticular disease.

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    Some conditions signal potential for Type 2 diabetes

    A physical examination of a healthy 6-year-old reveals a few conditions, such as elevated weight in relation to height and dark marks on the skin, as potential signs of developing Type 2 diabetes later in life.

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    Receding hairlines, ear lobe folds may signal heart disease

    Want a clue to your risk of heart disease? Look in the mirror. People who look old — with receding hairlines, bald heads, creases near their earlobes or bumpy deposits on their eyelids — have a greater chance of developing of heart disease than younger-looking people the same age do, new research suggests. Doctors say the study highlights the difference between biological and chronological age.

  •  
    Huge dust clouds, like this one captured in 1935 in Boise City, Okla., wiped out farms and destroyed families during the Great Depression. Survivors of the dust storms of the 1930s tell their stories in Ken Burns’ oral history documentary “The Dust Bowl,” which airs Sunday and Monday, Nov. 18-19, on PBS.

    Ken Burns’ ‘Dust Bowl’ explores story of ecological disaster

    They recall the days turning black, the winds whipping through towns, taking with them the family's livelihoods, the soil on which they farmed. In those natural disasters, thousands died, but no one is sure just how many. Survivors of the dust storms of the 1930s tell their stories in Ken Burns' oral history documentary "The Dust Bowl" Sunday and Monday, Nov. 18 and 19, on PBS.

  •  
    At Thank Dog! Bootcamp in Arlington, Va., Tucker Berry pulls on resistance weight bands as Tugboat stands by.

    Owners, pets hounded to shape up at boot camp

    Expect to pick up more than just weights if you enlist in Thank Dog! Bootcamp, a fitness and obedience program that has started up in an Arlington, Va., park. "We clean up our poop. It's one of the rules of class," says owner and personal trainer Karen Krieg, who'd been looking for a way to merge her two loves: fitness and dogs. She found her inspiration while watching Animal Planet's "Dogs 101."

  •  
    1970 Plymouth Superbird

    Aerodynamic 1970 Plymouth Superbird pleases watchers

    It's only fitting that Doug Schellinger and his dad, Monroe, would come to love and appreciate the Plymouth Superbird by watching it in its natural environment — in action on the racetrack. Four decades ago, the father and son would watch the Superbird race aroud the Milwaukee Mile.

  •  
    Marianne Kelly, founder of the Image Recovery Center, a beauty salon at Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore, Md., draws an eyebrow on Margaret Fisher’s face. Many hospitals offer beauty salon services that boost patients’ self-esteem.

    Cancer patients get a dose of self-esteem at hospital salons

    Self-image's effect on health and recovery is a topic filled with anecdotal evidence but few data. Nonetheless, doctors and nurses are finding that paying attention to what might be seen as superficial concerns — hair and makeup — has a positive effect on patients, with beauty regimes being bright spots in what can be a dreary journey through radiation and other therapies. Because of these perceived benefits, programs focused on cosmetic solutions are spreading.

Discuss

  •  

    Editorial: A good goal on smoking, but bad legislation

    While the intention of legislation restricting smokers from working at a cancer treatment center is noble, the bill would make for bad policy, a Daily Herald editorial says.

  •  

    Susan Rice’s tarnished resume

    Columnist Dana Milbank: Rice was following orders from the White House, which she does well. But the nation's top diplomat needs to show more sensitivity and independence — traits Clinton has demonstrated in abundance. Obama can do better at State than Susan Rice.

  •  

    Give consumer protection bureau a day in court

    Columnist George Will: The CFPB nullifies Congress' power to use the power of the purse to control bureaucracies because its funding — "determined by the director" — comes not from congressional appropriations but from the Federal Reserve. Untethered from all three branches of government, unlike anything created since 1789, the CFPB is uniquely sovereign

  •  

    Don’t punish those with modest pensions
    An Arlington Heights letter to the editor: Bite the bullet and fix the system and take away undeserved huge pensions if you must, but don't take away the modest, well-deserved pensions of the rest of us.

  •  

    A touching show of respect for veterans
    A letter to the editor: The program for veterans atJames C. Bush Elementary School in Johnsburg far exceeded any of my expectations. Patriotism and respect are alive and well in this country.

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