Daily Archive : Sunday August 19, 2012

News

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    Megan Boken at 17 in this November 2006 photo of Wheaton St. Francis vs. Morton during quarter finals of the IHSA Class AA girls volleyball.l

    Robbery suspected motive in Megan Boken's killing

    Police in St. Louis said today they suspect Wheaton native Megan Boken was shot to death during a robbery attempt. Police spokesman Dave Marzullo told the St. Louis Post-Dispatch that detectives are investigating the killing as a probable attempted robbery and hope to review surveillance footage from a nearby intersection.

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    Strip club tax will fund rape crisis centers

    Strip clubs in Illinois will have to hand over a share of their revenues, starting in 2013, to help fund programs to prevent sexual assault and counsel victims under a law signed by Gov. Pat Quinn.

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    Illinois House Republican Leader Tom Cross of Oswego argues pension legislation during Friday's special session. Republicans, including Cross, have opposed shifting some of the state's pension costs to local schools.

    Local schools dodge pension funding bullet

    With no action on pensions during Friday's special legislative sessions, suburban school districts have once again dodged a plan that would have them pay millions of dollars more a year for teachers' pensions. "At this point, until we actually see something firm, we're trying not to worry about it," said Tony Sanders, chief of staff for Elgin Area School District U-46.

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    Long before Mitt Romney became the millionaire candidate from Massachusetts, he was his father’ son, weeding the garden in the upscale suburb of Detroit where he grew up. He hated the chore. But he idolized the man who made him do it _ George Romney, the outspoken, no-nonsense, auto executive turned politician.

    Profile: Trying to see into the heart of Mitt Romney

    Long before Mitt Romney became the millionaire candidate from Massachusetts, he was his father’s son, weeding the garden in the upscale suburb of Detroit where he grew up. He hated the chore. But he idolized the man who made him do it — George Romney, the outspoken, no-nonsense, auto executive turned politician.

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    From left, Yu Nan, Terry Crews, Sylvester Stallone, Randy Couture and Dolph Lundgren star in “The Expendables 2,” which debuted at No. 1 in its first weekend of release.

    ’Expendables 2’ brawls to No. 1 with $28.8 million

    Sylvester Stallone's action hero roundup "The Expendables 2" debuted at No. 1 with $28.8 million, according to studio estimates Sunday. The Lionsgate sequel elbowed out another action tale as Universal's "The Bourne Legacy" fell to No. 2 in its second weekend with $17 million. That was a steep 55 percent drop from its $38.1 million opening weekend, though the movie's domestic total climbed to a...

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    The Aeroshell Aerobatic Team performs on the opening day of the Chicago Air and Water Show on Saturday, Aug. 18, 2012 in Chicago.

    Images: Chicago Air & Water Show
    The 54th Annual Chicago Air and Water Show along the lakefront of Lake Michigan on Sunday, August 19, 2012. The show is the largest free admission air and water exhibition of its kind in the United States with audience numbers reaching 2.2 million spectators.

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    Man found dead after domestic disturbance in Elgin

    Elgin police are investigating the death of a 55-year-old man who was unresponsive and not breathing at an apartment building Saturday afternoon.

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    Karen Femali, of Huntley, picks up a business card in the booth of Larry Schumacher of Beloit, Wis. Sunday at the Huntley Artfest.

    Huntley Artfest doubles attendance in second year

    Huntley Artfest doubled its attendance in year two with more than 4,000 people showing up to admire and buy fine art displayed during the two-day juried show. Volunteers from the First Congregational United Church of Christ brought almost 50 artists from across the region and the United States to downtown Huntley with food vendors and local talent rounding out the festival.

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    St. Matthew garage sale in Hawthorn Woods

    St. Matthew Lutheran Church hosts its 26th annual Largest Elegant Garage Sale on Saturday, Sept. 15.

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    Elmhurst Memorial Hospital held the opening of their new Addison Health Center Sunday afternoon. The 55,000 square foot facility on Lake Street features, MRI, X-ray and other health procedures.

    Elmhurst Healthcare formally opens Addison center

    Hundreds of families toured Elmhurst Memorial Hospital's new Addision Health Center, at 303 W. Lake St., during the opening celebration Sunday. Visitors saw the new state-of-the-art facility, checked out emergency and police vehicles, and played health-themed games

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    Homeless man found dead near Lombard

    A homeless man was found dead in an unincorporated area near Lombard Sunday, the DuPage County Sheriff's Office said. Police responded to a call this morning of a man not breathing near the southeast corner of South Grace Street and East 15th Place.

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    David Jovic, 5, stares at a huge model train layout while wearing his conductor’s hat Sunday at the 28th National Garden Railway Convention in St. Charles. He was with his dad Ray, of Lake Zurich.

    Model railroaders flock to St. Charles

    About 1,500 model train lovers filled the Pheasant Run Resort in St. Charles this weekend for the 28th annual National Garden Railway Convention. Away from the resort, more than 40 people opened their homes to hundreds of interested "model railroaders," showing off their backyards and the train sets that fill them.

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    Alex Masterton, 12, quickly sinks in his boat as Fox Lake firefighter Dana Magness tries to help during the annual Cardboard Cup Regatta Sunday at Lakefront Park sponsored by the Village of Fox Lake Parks and Recreation Department. Contestants built boats made strictly of cardboard, duct tape and paint, and then raced them for medals and trophies.

    Cardboard boats set sail at Fox Lake regatta

    Cardboard is usually associated with the more utilitarian aspects of life, like storing old files. But Fox Lake's Cardboard Cup Regatta, held Sunday afternoon at Lakefront Park, proved that the combination of cardboard, water and sunshine — with the addition of some crayon and marker decorations — can add up to an enjoyable afternoon.

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    This April 4, 2011 file photo shows country winger Wynonna Judd from The Judds, performing at the Girls’ Night Out: Superstar Women of Country in Las Vegas. Judd says she is postponing scheduled concerts in Canada next week after her husband was hurt in a motorcycling accident Saturday in South Dakota.

    Wynonna Judd’s husband hurt in crash

    Country singer Wynonna Judd announced Sunday that she is postponing concerts scheduled in Canada next week after her husband was hurt in a motorcycle accident in South Dakota. "The outpouring of prayer and support from friends, family and fans has been a blessing to both Cactus and I," she said Sunday in a statement.

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    Grant Township queens Junior Miss Gabriela Schoenberg, front, Teen Miss Jessie Burdett, and Miss Bethani Jacobsen paddle their boat along the racecourse during the annual Cardboard Cup Regatta Sunday at Lakefront Park sponsored by the Village of Fox Lake Parks and Recreation Department. Contestants built boats made strictly of cardboard, duct tape and paint and raced for medals and trophies.

    Images: Fox Lake Cardboard Regatta
    The annual Cardboard Cup Regatta Sunday at Lakefront Park sponsored by the Village of Fox Lake Parks and Recreation Department. Contestants built boats made strictly of cardboard, duct tape and paint and raced for medals and trophies.

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    Republican presidential candidate, former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney, carries an iPad as he walks into the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints on Sunday in Wolefboro, N.H.

    Obama, Romney pass Sunday in church, with families

    President Barack Obama and Republican challenger Mitt Romney spent a quiet Sunday attending church with their families, resting up for the campaign's final 11 weeks and the approaching party nominating conventions.

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    An electric clock is set on Mars Time at the home of David Oh, a flight director of NASA’s latest Mars mission in La Canada Flintridge, Calif. The Oh family has been living on Mars time and following an odd schedule ever since the NASA rover Curiosity landed in an ancient Martian crater Aug. 5.

    Like NASA rover, family switches over to Mars time

    Since the landing of NASA's newest Mars rover, flight director David Oh's family has taken the unusual step of tagging along as he leaves Earth time behind and syncs his body clock with the red planet.

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    WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange gestures after his statement to the media and supporters on a balcony of the Ecuadorian Embassy in London Sunday. Assange entered the embassy in June in an attempt to gain political asylum to prevent him from being extradited to Sweden, where he faces allegations of sex crimes, which he denies.

    Assange urges U.S. to end Wikileaks ‘witch hunt’

    Wikileaks founder Julian Assange portrayed himself Sunday as a victim of an American "witch hunt" over his secret-spilling website in a defiant address from the balcony of an embassy where he has holed up to avoid extradition to face sex assault allegations.

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    In this photo released by the Syrian official news agency SANA, Syrian president, Bashar Assad, performs Eid prayers in the Hamad Mosque in Damascus, Syria, Sunday. Eid al-Fitr is a three-day holiday marking the end of the holy month of Ramadan. The last time he appeared in public was July 4, when he gave a speech in parliament.

    Aleppo reflects on losses during holiday lull

    A brief lull in fighting for a Muslim holiday Sunday allowed residents of Aleppo to take stock of their losses after three weeks of intense battles left many in Syria's largest city strapped for cash, separated from loved ones and scared of more violence ahead.

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    Janice Durflinger poses for a photo at her workplace in Lincoln, Neb., Wednesday, Aug. 1, 2012. Durflinger is still working at age 76, running computer software programs for a bank. Still, she worries that a higher retirement age would be tough on people with more physically demanding jobs. “No matter how much you exercise, age takes its toll,” Durflinger said.

    Social Security fixable; changes politically tough

    Despite Social Security's long-term problems, the massive retirement and disability program could be preserved for generations to come with modest but politically difficult changes to benefits or taxes, or a combination of both. All of the options carry political risks because they have the potential to affect nearly every U.S. family while raising the ire of powerful interest groups.

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    Diane Peterson, left, and Kristen David show off their medals upon completion of their first Ironman competition in Madison, Wis., last year.

    Hawthorn Woods women dedicate Ironman Triathlon to friend

    After months of training, hours of running, swimming, and biking, two 44-year-old Hawthorn Woods women will participate in an Ironman competition to honor their friend and local hero, Ruth Paul-Caudie, who died earlier this year. “She was just an amazing woman, she was really instrumental,” Diane Peterson said. “She was just kind, never thought of herself first, even when she...

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    Rafael Alfaro of LandScapes Concepts of Grayslake cuts up an ash tree located on Colwyn Drive in Schaumburg after workers pushed it over with a tractor. More than 1,500 trees are slated for the chopping block in Schaumburg.

    How the emerald ash borer is changing the suburban landscape

    In the next 5 to 7 years, the tiny emerald ash borer will change the landscape of the suburbs, stripping parkways of their tree canopies, leading to flooding, higher utility bills. "This is a natural disaster in slow motion," Scott Shirmer, emerald ash borer program manager for the Illinois Department of Agriculture, said of the impact from loss of millions of trees that will die.

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    Teen bicyclist in critical condition after crash near West Chicago

    A 14-year-old boy is in critical condition after he was struck by a van Saturday afternoon while riding his bicycle near West Chicago. The DuPage County Sheriff's Office is investigating the crash, which occurred about 3:50 p.m. in the intersection of Donald Avenue and Prince Crossing Road.

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    Wauconda Twp. man wants vote on officials’ benefits

    A Wauconda Township man, who wants to get a question placed on the ballot so taxpayers could weigh in on whether township officials should start paying for part of their benefits, complained Saturday that the township is missing a chance to get the issue on the November ballot. But the township supervisor said if the issue doesn't get on the November ballot, it could go to the next election in...

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    Bank of America Stadium is shown in downtown Charlotte, N.C., Thursday, Aug. 16, 2012. The stadium is one of the sites of the Democratic National Convention. The convention starts on Sept. 3, 2012.

    Don’t expect parties to get bold in platforms

    Don't look for many bold pronouncements when Republicans and Democrats adopt party platforms at their national conventions. No candidate wants to provide political fodder for opponents by including something in the platform that might turn off the sought-after undecided swing voters who could decide the election.

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    A firefighter from the Norco Conservation Camp shields his face against the heat of a backfire his crew intentionally set along Montezuma Valley road in Ranchita, Calif. on Thrusday, Aug 15, 2012. The backfire was set to stop the approaching wildfire burning through the Anza-Borrego Desert State Park in northern San Diego County.

    Idaho evacuations ordered at fires rage in west

    Thunderstorms and lightning threatened fire officials' plans to contain a large blaze in central Washington state as hundreds of Washington and California residents returned home to find out whether their homes were spared.

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    Storm kills 9 in northern Vietnam, floods fields

    At least nine people were killed and at least 14 were injured by a storm that brought heavy rains to northern Vietnam over the weekend, according to the country’s central committee for flood and storm control.Typhoon Kai-tak also passed through southern China, causing floods and the evacuation of more than 500,000 people.

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    Sudan plane crash in south kills all 32 on board

    KHARTOUM, Sudan — The office of the Sudanese president says all 32 people on board died when a plane carrying a government delegation crashed in the country’s south.The crash in the early hours of Sunday killed the country’s minister of endowment, Ghazi al-Sadeq, and a leading member of Sudan’s Peace and Justice Party, Makki Balayela.

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    Official: Suicide bomber kills 1 in south Yemen
    Associated PressSANAA, Yemen — A Yemeni security official says a suicide bomber blew himself up in the country’s south, killing a leading member of a civilian militia that has fought alongside government troops to drive out al-Qaida militants from their southern strongholds.

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    ISU student shot at apartment building near campus

    NORMAL, Ill. — An Illinois State University student has been shot and injured at an apartment building near the campus.The (Bloomington) Pantagraph reports (http://bit.ly/NQpNpC ) that the shooting took place around 3 a.m. Saturday.Police in Normal say officers responded to reports of shots fired during a confrontation between people gathered at the apartment building

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    8 hurt after lightning strikes Minn. beach area

    DULUTH, Minn. — Authorities say eight people have been injured after lightning struck a Lake Superior beach area in northeastern Minnesota.Duluth Assistant Fire Chief Jarry Keppers says a 9-year-old boy is in “very serious” condition and at least three adults are also seriously hurt. They have been taken to hospitals.

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    Children learn bike safety at Chicago day camp

    Chicago is putting on a week-long bicycle safety day camp as part of its efforts to promote cycling in the city.About 80 children are participating this week and will receive new bicycles and helmets that were donated.They’ll get tips on safe cycling, route selection and map reading.

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    14-year-old among 13 shot in Chicago overnight

    Chicago police say a 14-year-old boy is among 12 people wounded and one killed in separate shootings on Saturday night.Police told the Chicago Tribune (http://trib.in/N9DD8m ) the 14-year-old is in stable condition at a children’s hospital. They didn’t have more details on that shooting.

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    N. Ind. man found dead beneath tractor

    CROWN POINT, Ind. — Northern Indiana authorities say a man found dead beneath a tractor may have been stricken with a medical condition before he fell beneath the machine.Lake County coroner’s office spokesman PJ Adams tells The Times of Munster (http://bit.ly/QcjOaP ) that 59-year-old Steven Seckendorf was found dead Friday night under a tractor outside his Calumet Township home.

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    Collections agency boosts Indiana parking ticket revenue

    BLOOMINGTON, Ind. — Parking scofflaws in Bloomington have a new incentive to pay their tickets on time.The city this year started sending tickets that have gone unpaid for 30 days to a collections agency in an effort to boost revenue and improve efficiency. So far, the agency has brought in nearly $80,000. That’s an increase of almost $26,000 from the first seven months of 2011.

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    Ill. hunters hope drought won’t hurt duck season

    QUINCY, Ill. — Illinois waterfowl hunters are pleased at this year’s proposed 60-day duck hunting season. But some are wondering if the drought will mean too little food to keep ducks in the Mississippi River basin long enough.

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    An in-depth look at key players in 2012 presidential election

    Barack Obama has shown many sides during his four years in office. Mitt Romney, the millionaire candidate from Massachusetts, is father's son. Vice President Joe Biden is no ordinary Joe. Paul Ryan has shown a knack for eliciting mixed feelings. Ann Romney embraces her stay-at-home-mom image. Michelle Obama often inspires awe. These are the key figures in the 2012 presidential election.

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    In this July 13, 2012, file photo, first lady Michelle Obama smiles as she honors the Smithsonian's Cooper-Hewitt National Design Award winners in the East Room of the White House in Washington. She is 5-foot-11, and she is world-famous. Sometimes she inspires awe in her admirers. She has been accused of being the angry type. So when Michelle Obama meets people, she likes to bring things down to earth with a hug.

    Profile: The person and the persona of Michelle Obama

    Michelle Obama is 5-foot-11, and she is world-famous. Sometimes she inspires awe in her admirers. She has been accused of being the angry type. So when Michelle Obama meets people, she likes to bring things down to earth with a hug. It happens over and over, wherever Michelle Obama goes — the human connections made by a charismatic public person, and the careful construction of a very...

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    Paul Ryan initially established his reputation in Congress mostly behind-the-scene, impressing GOP colleagues with his willingness to delve into complex number-crunching and budgetary minutia. But he has become in the past couple of years one of the highest-profile and influential members of the House, to the point that he engaged in verbal showdowns with President Barack Obama.

    Profile: Paul Ryan: Wisconsin roots, Washington clout

    Since his youth, Paul Ryan has shown a knack for eliciting mixed feelings. Classmates at Joseph A. Craig High School in Janesville, Wis., bestowed on him the dubious title of "Biggest Brown-Noser." They also elected him class president and anointed him prom king. "I've known Paul Ryan for a long time. He's a serious guy," said Wisconsin state Sen. Tim Cullen, a moderate Democrat who shares...

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    In this July 12, 2012, file photo, Vice President Joe Biden addresses the NAACP annual convention in Houston. In May, after Joe Biden tripped up his boss by voicing support for same-sex marriage while the president remained on the fence, there was speculation about whether the remarks were spontaneous or deliberate. But to those who know Biden, there was no doubt. He was just speaking his mind.

    Profile: Biden a regular and not-so-regular Joe

    In May, after Joe Biden tripped up his boss by voicing support for same-sex marriage while the president remained on the fence, there was speculation about whether the remarks were spontaneous or deliberate. But to those who know Biden, there was no doubt. He was just speaking his mind.

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    In this July 23, 2012, file photo, President Barack Obama gestures at a campaign stop in Oakland, Calif. Nearly four years after Barack Obama was elected to the most powerful office in the most powerful country in the world, the question remains: Who is he? This is a man who seemed to come out of nowhere. He had served seven years in the Illinois state Senate, and less than four years in the U.S. Senate _ a meager political resume, augmented by a stirring speech at the 2004 Democratic National Convention.

    Profile: Obama no longer a blank slate

    Nearly four years after Barack Obama was elected to the most powerful office in the most powerful country in the world, the question remains: Who is he? This is a man who seemed to come out of nowhere. He had served seven years in the Illinois state Senate, and less than four years in the U.S. Senate _ a meager political resume, augmented by a stirring speech at the 2004 Democratic National...

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    This April 1965 photo provided by Romney for President, Inc., shows Mitt Romney, right, with future wife Ann Davies at her 16th birthday party in Bloomfield Hills, Mich. The couple was married in 1969. To the yearbook editors at the all-girl Kingswood School, Ann Lois Davies’ destiny seemed pretty obvious. “The first lady,” the entry beside the stunning blond beauty’s photo in the 1967 edition of “Woodwinds” concluded. “Quiet and soft spoken.”

    Images: Republican Profiles, 2012 Election
    Images of Republican personalities in the 2012 Presidential Election- Mitt and Ann Romney.

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    In this July 13, 2012, file photo, President Barack Obama gestures during a campaign stop at Green Run High School in Virginia Beach, Va. Nearly four years after Barack Obama was elected to the most powerful office in the most powerful country in the world, the question remains: Who is he? This is a man who seemed to come out of nowhere. He had served seven years in the Illinois state Senate, and less than four years in the U.S. Senate _ a meager political resume, augmented by a stirring speech at the 2004 Democratic National Convention.

    Images: Democrat Profiles, 2012 Election
    Images of personalities in the 2012 Presidential Election- President Barack and First Lady Michelle Obama as well as Vice President Joe Biden

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    In this March 5, 2012, file photo, Ann Romney, wife of Republican presidential candidate, former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney, wipes lipstick off his face after kissing him at a campaign rally in Zanesville, Ohio. To the yearbook editors at the all-girl Kingswood School, Ann Lois Davies’ destiny seemed pretty obvious. “The first lady,” the entry beside the stunning blond beauty’s photo in the 1967 edition of “Woodwinds” concluded. “Quiet and soft spoken.” The modern feminist movement was just dawning, and even some of the girls at the staid prep school in the wealthy Detroit suburb of Bloomfield Hills were feeling their oats _ if in a somewhat tame way. Charlon McMath Hibbard remembers getting a doctor’s note about her feet, so she wouldn’t have to wear the obligatory saddle Oxfords.

    Profile: Ann Romney proudly owns stay-at-home mom image

    To the yearbook editors at the all-girl Kingswood School, Ann Lois Davies' destiny seemed pretty obvious. "The first lady," the entry beside the stunning blond beauty's photo in the 1967 edition of "Woodwinds" concluded. Considering that their classmate was already betrothed to Willard Mitt Romney, the "Woodwinds" staff weren't exactly going out on a limb.

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    Sadie’s recovering after being left for dead in Kentucky.

    Dog shot in head on the mend

    A mother dog shot "right between the eyes" has been adopted by a woman determined to not only save the dog's life but give her the therapy needed to walk again. Joal Dauer, formerly of Lake Villa and Kildeer, has Sadie undergoing a litany of therapies that include acupuncture, holistic laser treatments and use of a vibrating device invented in the 1960s to help Soviet cosmonauts overcome the...

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    Traffickers sell drugs in the Antares slum in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Some drug bosses say they have stopped selling crack because it destabilizes their communities, making it harder to control areas long abandoned by the government. City authorities take credit for the change, arguing that drug gangs are trying to create a distraction and make police back off their offensive to take back the slums.

    Brazil: Drug dealers say no to crack in Rio

    Some drug bosses in Brazil say they have stopped selling crack because it destabilizes their communities, making it harder to control areas long abandoned by the government. City authorities take credit for the change, arguing that drug gangs are trying to create a distraction and make police back off their offensive to take back the slums.

Sports

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    Numbers up across the board on Million Day

    If the weather cooperates and you put on a good show, the fans will show up — and they will wager — as the folks at Arlington Park discovered Saturday. The 2012 Arlington Million crowd of 34,022 not only represented a 10 percent increase from the 31,069 that attended in 2011, but it also was the largest Million Day crowd since the current facility opened in 1989 and the fourth highest in the 30-year history of the Million. On track, the $2,891,660 bet was 13 percent higher than the $2,562,613 handled the previous year.

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    Boomers hold on for 13-12 win

    The Schaumburg Boomers scored 13 runs on 16 hits Sunday and needed every one of them as they hung on for a 13-12 victory at Boomers Stadium. The Boomers (48-26) relied on the heart of the batting order as four players combined for 14 of the 16 hits.

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    Cougars falter late in 7-4 loss

    Despite falling behind early, the Kane County Cougars battled back to carry a lead into the eighth inning but couldn't hold it in a 7-4 loss to the Burlington Bees on Sunday at Community Field.

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    Did this weekend’s preseason victory over Washington tell us anything about Lovie Smith’s Bears? No, but fans will continue to make too much out of not much, says Mike Imrem.

    NFL training camps a whole lot of nothing

    In a relatively boring sports month like August, even no news from Bears' preseason games and practices has to be be packaged into something important.

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    Brandon Hardin tackles Redskins tight end Logan Paulsen during the second half of the Bears’ preseason win Saturday at Soldier Field. Hardin, the team’s third-round draft pick, was taken off the field on a stretcher after the play.

    Lake Zurich’s Blanchard trying to make Bears

    As the Bears' No. 4 quarterback, undrafted rookie Matt Blanchard is a longshot whose best shot at a job is on the eight-man practice squad. But the Lake Zurich High School graduate showed impressive poise Saturday night guiding the two-minute drill that set up Robbie Gould's 57-yard, game-winning field goal.

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    White Sox scouting report
    Scouting report: White Sox vs. New York Yankees

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    Cubs scouting report
    Cubs scouting report

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    White Sox starting pitcher Jose Quintana walks to the mound Sunday after giving up a two-run double in sixth inning in Kansas City.

    Sox swept away by Guthrie, Royals

    Jeremy Guthrie flirted with a no-hitter, Salvador Perez drove in three runs and the Kansas City Royals beat the White Sox 5-2 on Sunday to complete a three-game series sweep of the AL Central leaders. Paul Konerko reached on an infield single with two out in the seventh for Chicago's first hit. Shortstop Alcides Escobar fielded Konerko's grounder on the outfield grass and his one-hop throw was dropped by first baseman Eric Hosmer. Official scorer Del Black ruled it a hit and the Kauffman Stadium crowd of 22,401 loudly booed when the "H" was flashed on the scoreboard.

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    Cubs outfielder Alfonso Soriano, right, is tagged out by Cincinnati Reds shortstop Zack Cozart, left, after being caught stealing second base in Sunday’s fourth inning in Cincinnati.

    Cubs lose in ninth inning

    Xavier Paul led off the ninth inning with a pinch-hit triple and Ryan Hanigan followed with a single Sunday, giving the Cincinnati Reds a 5-4 win over the Cubs. Paul lined the first pitch from Shawn Camp (3-6) over first base into the right-field corner. Hanigan hit the next pitch to left-center over the drawn-in Chicago outfield.

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    Chicago Bears running back Michael Bush scores the first of his two first-half touchdowns Saturday against the Washington Redskins in the second preseason game at Soldier Field in Chicago.

    Images: Bears defeat Redskins 33-31
    The Chicago Bears faced the Washington Redskins in their second preseason game of the year. The Bears defeated the Redskins 33-31 on a last second Robbie Gould field goal.

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    Joaquin Arias leads Giants to 8-7 win over Padres

    Joaquin Arias homered and drove in three runs, and the San Francisco Giants used another big inning to beat the San Diego Padres 8-7 on Saturday. Arias hit a leadoff homer in the second and had an RBI single to cap a four-run fifth that put the Giants ahead 5-4. He blooped an RBI single in the seventh when San Francisco scored twice to take a 7-5 lead.

Business

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    The Groupon logo etched in glass in the lobby of the online coupon company's Chicago offices Thursday, Sept. 22, 2011. Online coupon seller Groupon Inc. is discounting its expectations for its first stock offering, reported Friday, Oct. 21, 2011. The company, which offers consumers daily discounts targeted to their city and preferences, now expects net proceeds of about $478.8 million from its initial public offering of 30 million shares. (AP Photo/Charles Rex Arbogast)

    The thrilling (and welcome?) demise of Groupon

    "Groupon is not an Internet marketing business so much as it is the equivalent of a loan sharking business," wrote Rakesh Agrawal, an analyst and journalist. He says Groupon made its fortune by giving great deals to customers and horrible ones to businesses. Groupon is a public company now, and its business method may have caught up to it: The firm had horrible second-quarter earnings, with customer growth and amount of money spent per customer slowing.

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    Monday is the only day the stock market is more likely to fall than to rise.

    The least loved day is also the market’s worst

    It’s not just in your head. Mondays really are the worst. Monday is the only day the stock market is more likely to fall than to rise. The Dow Jones industrial average has been down 10 of the past 11 Mondays. And the two worst days in market history are both known as Black Monday. There’s no single reason why Mondays are so blue. Then again, there’s no single reason the market rises or falls on any given day, driven as it is by the whims of traders placing millions of individual buy and sell orders.

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    By voting for the airlines’ proposal, which includes numerous concessions, American Airlines flight attendants staved off the chance American would impose even deeper cuts in bankruptcy court.

    American Airlines’ flight attendants OK contract

    Flight attendants at American Airlines voted to approve a new contract offer from the airline, which is seeking to cut costs in bankruptcy protection.

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    The 2013 Honda Accord hits showrooms in a couple weeks, with a fresh athletic look and better fuel economy. Honda, burned by criticism that it cheapened its new Civic earlier this year, says that won’t happen with its newest remake.

    Honda looks to silence critics with new Accord

    Honda wants to silence its critics when it rolls out the new Accord this week. The automaker, chastened for cheapening the Civic compact earlier this year, says that won't happen with the midsize Accord.

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    The New York Times Co. on Tuesday named Mark Thompson as its president and CEO.

    Mark Thompson remade ‘Auntie Beeb’ for digital era

    In BBC boss Mark Thompson, the New York Times has chosen a chief executive who has never worked at a newspaper — but has plenty of experience reshaping a venerable media institution for the digital age. "What they are not getting is a man of great experience in the harsh commercial environment afflicting the media at the moment," Columnist and former newspaper editor Roy Greenslade said.

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    Bride Robin Lehr and groom Chris Lehr and guests drink beer at their wedding reception held at House on the Hill in Austin, Texas. The Lehrs made four different beers, including a 16-hour brewing marathon day to make 45 gallons, for their wedding.

    Brewing up love: Weddings tap craft beer craze

    You may now chug with the bride. Toasting the bride and groom with Champagne is de rigueur. But recently, couples hip (or is that hops?) to craft beers are shaking up the wedding reception scene by insisting on serving the brews they love on their big day, everything from local ales to home brews concocted by the bride and groom.

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    Studies show roughly a quarter of patients don’t take medicines they need because they cannot afford them. There are plenty of ways to save big on medicines, but the complexity of finding the best deal can be a huge headache.

    Looking to save on prescriptions? It’s complicated

    Struggling to pay for your prescription medication? You're far from alone: Studies show roughly a quarter of patients don't take medicines they need because they cannot afford them. There are plenty of ways to save big on medicines, but the complexity of finding the best deal can be a huge headache.

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    Target-date investors get more low-cost options

    Even hands-off investors should aim to minimize their expenses. A growing number of target-date funds aim to reduce ongoing expenses by investing in low-cost index mutual funds, exchange-traded funds or a mix of both. These funds are typically available to any investor with a few thousand dollars to start. Here's a look at some of the latest low-cost options

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    Trixie, 3, a pit bull, tries out an aquatic treadmill meant for dogs in need of lower impact exercise, during a demonstration at LA Dog Works in Los Angeles. The aquatic treadmill is one of three different types at LA Dog Works. LA Dog Works, a 24-hour dog care center, which includes boarding, grooming, training, day care, hydrotherapy, massage therapy and a retail store, also uses a $3,000 Jog A Dog and a $40,000 underwater treadmill from a company that is now Hudson Aquatic Systems.

    Dog treadmill sales brisk as pets shape up

    Some 3 million dogs across the country were using treadmills in 2010, according to a survey of pet owners by the American Pet Products Association. The group asked about treadmills for the first time in its 2011/2012 survey because the machines were selling so briskly, APPA President Bob Vetere said. It may look like the dog is going nowhere. But pet owners with fat, old or misbehaving dogs say they measure the benefits of canine treadmills in pounds, years and sleep.

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    Andy Schepper, vice president of Summit Sports in Keego Harbor, Mich., says business is up 20 percent from last year. But sales of inline skates are down nearly 20 percent. Over the years, he’s learned that very few people want to skate and bake in the sun.

    Small businesses look to plan B in extreme weather

    This summer, many small businesses that depend on high temperatures got more than they bargained for. With plants shriveling up and outdoorsy types feeling it's too hot to be active in the extreme summer heat, many small business owners with seasonal enterprises aren't ringing up robust sales. Their experience highlights the need for businesses that depend on Mother Nature's cooperation to have a plan B whether that means cutting expenses or finding alternate revenue streams.

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    Wesley Brooks, 7, of Huntsville, Ala., has his hair cut by Melinda Gilbert at the J.C. Penney styling salon in Huntsville, Ala. J.C. Penney is running a nationwide program giving kids ages 5-12 free back-to-school haircuts during the month of August.

    Smart Spending: Finding back-to-school deals

    Stores are going all out to pull you in the door for back-to-school shopping. That's because every retailer wants a piece of the $83.8 billion that the National Retail Federation expects Americans will spend this back-to-school season. "They're trying to get you in the store and keep you in there and spend more money," said Lauren Greutman, deal expert at coupon website Savings.com and founder of savings site IAmThatLady.com.

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    Walt and Nicole Mazie prepare food at their restaurant The Big Easy in Flagler Beach, Fla. Walt Mazie knows it was risky launching a business during hard times. Business was so dismal at first that on some Friday nights, Mazie says, he and his wife sat outside because there were no customers. They held on, though, and about six months ago, there was a turnaround. Mazie says business has increased about 65 percent over last year, thanks to positive publicity and an improved economy.

    Florida highway offers clues to presidential race

    Florida's economy is center stage in President Barack Obama and Mitt Romney's high-stakes campaign for the rich trove of 29 electoral votes. One of the biggest prizes still up for grabs, this state, a hard-fought White House battleground in 2000, could be just as pivotal this year. And no turf may be more important than the I-4 corridor, the heart of swing voter country, home to foreclosures and fresh starts, pain and prosperity, hope, anxiety and a frustration with politics — America in microcosm.

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    If your weight is caused by a disability, or if you live in a jurisdiction — such as the District of Columbia, San Francisco or the state of Michigan — that bans discrimination on the basis of personal appearance, it could be illegal for your company to allow co-workers to harass you because of your weight.

    Work advice: How an overweight worker can deal with a workplace bully

    Editor’s note: Karla L. Miller writes an advice column on navigating the modern workplace. Each week she will answer one or two questions from readers.Q: I am a big guy. I will not lie — I like food, and I am responsible for the consequences. There are other factors, too: genetics, medications I take and activity-limiting health issues. Yet I have taken only one sick day in 20 years at my company. I go to medical appointments off the clock. My health has never affected my performance, and I have never asked for special accommodations. I have piles of commendations and awards to prove that I do my job very well.I am working with a doctor, physical therapist and nutritionist, and have a diet and exercise plan. I have lost 45 pounds. My problem is a fitness nut co-worker — same managerial level — who has begun posting signs around the office about how ugly fat people are and how fit people are “more useful” than overweight people, etc. He makes nasty comments about my weight in front of my people and uses any reason to call me incompetent.My employer is notorious for finding health-related reasons to let older workers go, so going to human resources doesn’t make sense.I am usually laid-back, but I have had it. Nothing helps, from assurances that I am working on it to telling him to back off. How can I get Jack LaLanne Jr. to mind his own business?A: First, you deserve a high-five for taking charge of yourself. But even if you sat at your desk horking down Boston cream doughnuts, you wouldn’t deserve Slim Goodbody’s catty vendetta. Stop striving to earn his worthless approval by “assuring” him that you’re working on your weight. The only weight-related issues here are his.If your weight is caused by a disability, or if you live in a jurisdiction — such as the District of Columbia, San Francisco or the state of Michigan — that bans discrimination on the basis of personal appearance, it could be illegal for your company to allow co-workers to harass you because of your weight. Furthermore, Skinny Vinny’s non-work-related broadsides might violate office policy. Plus, he’s sowing discord. Those are issues HR should care about.But you’ve said you don’t want to go to HR. And it might be more effective, and more satisfying, to block this cocky colleague yourself. First, however, you have to reject his “fit vs. fat” battleground and address this as a professional issue: He is undermining a fellow manager.Next time Skeletor picks a bone with you, say: “Look, if you have a legitimate issue with my performance, let’s talk about it with my manager. Otherwise, stop taking swipes at me in front of my people. It’s disrespectful and unprofessional.” I doubt he’ll be willing to spout his snark in front of a higher-up.Standing up to Jack LaLame will empower you and others. It’s time to throw your professional weight around.Thanks to Sharon Snyder of Ober Kaler for legal insights.Ÿ Karla L. Miller has written for and edited tax publications for 16 years, most recently for the accounting firm KPMG’s Washington National Tax office.

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    Paul McFeeters is pictured in a Cudd workshop near Woodward, Okla. McFeeters said he had two jobs, delivering pizzas and working as a night watchman at a manufacturing facility in Arkansas, when he landed a job with a hydraulic fracturing crew. Even without his wife’s salary as a nurse’s assistant, the couple’s income jumped from $2,000 a month to $4,000.

    Oil boom brings scarcity of workers in small towns

    The expansion of drilling has breathed economic life into many small Oklahoma towns, the lucrative opportunities are also drawing people away from traditional service-sector jobs and even once-coveted state positions. "If you can walk and breathe out here, you can get a good job," said LaVern Phillips, president of the Industrial Foundation in Woodward, Okla. The county's unemployment rate hovered around 3 percent in June, 5 percentage points lower than the national average. In some nearby counties, the rate has dipped below 2 percent.

Life & Entertainment

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    Los Angeles police are investigating a minor traffic accident Sunday involving actress Amanda Bynes after a person reported the actress left without providing her information.

    Bynes being investigated in traffic accident

    Los Angeles police are investigating a minor traffic accident involving actress Amanda Bynes after a person reported the actress left without providing her information.

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    Tony Scott, seen here in 2010 at the premiere of “Unstoppable,” died Sunday after jumping off a bridge in Los Angeles.

    ‘Top Gun’ director Tony Scott jumps to his death

    Tony Scott, director of such action-movie classics as "Top Gun," "Man on Fire" and "Crimson Tide," has died after jumping from a Los Angeles County Bridge. Los Angeles County Coroner's Lt. Joe Bale says Scott's death Sunday is being investigated as a suicide.

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    In this picture taken Aug. 18. 2012, US singer Madonna performs one stage during a concert in Zurich, Switzerland.

    Madonna sued in Russia for supporting gays

    Some Russian activists have sued Madonna for millions of dollars, claiming they were offended by her support for gay rights during a recent concert in St. Petersburg.

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    Getting kids ready to fly solo

    Parents who need to send their kids traveling alone shouldn't fret. Hundreds of thousands of kids fly on their own each year although the government doesn't keep detailed data. And while there are occasional mishaps — which would petrify any parent — experts say they represent a small minority of overall trips.

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    This Aug. 4, 2012 photo shows Four Seasons Resort Vail Executive Chef Jason Harrison, left, looking on as mushroom guide Larry Evans, center, shows off specimens collected during a foraging trip organized by Four Seasons Resort Vail in Vail, Colo. For $200 a person, the Four Seasons Resort Vail is sending out guided expeditions in luxury SUVs to look for mushrooms. The Mushrooms & Mercedes program includes a lunchtime break with wine, cheese and prosciutto, and ends with a three-course mushroom-themed meal back at the hotel.

    Hotel puts luxury twist on mushroom-hunting trips

    Mushroom hunting has never been as easy — or comfortable — as this. For $200 a person, the Four Seasons Resort Vail is sending out guided expeditions in luxury SUVs to look for mushrooms. The Mushrooms & Mercedes program includes a lunchtime break with wine, cheese and prosciutto, and ends with a three-course mushroom-themed meal back at the hotel.

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    Grower Alan Spinniken examines a bin filled with Early Gold apples in his orchard near Suttons Bay, Mich. Spinniken lost about one-third of his crop because of bad weather but said heís grateful things werenít worse.

    Great Lakes apple harvest off to early start

    Apple-picking, a cherished autumn tradition, is off to an early start in the Northeast and Upper Midwest as growers deal with aftershocks from wacky spring weather that hammered fruit crops.

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    Factors to consider before actively seeking a tenant

    Q. I have a rental home and can't seem to find any qualified tenants. Recently, a friend of mine who is also a landlord told me that all of his rental properties are full, and he credits the fact that they are furnished as being the key difference. Should I consider buying furniture for my property and offering it as a furnished home?

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    Fuel gauge, fuel pump still not connecting

    I recently received a follow-up question from the driver of a Pontiac Montana minivan whose fuel gauge was malfunctioning, always reading full. I had recommended he use a scan tool to measure the signal.

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    Because drop-in sinks are considered the standard type of sink, you may have more colors and styles from which to choose.

    Weighing advantages to drop-in versus under-mount sink

    Q. My wife and I can't decide on what type of kitchen sink to get for our new stone countertops. Other than price, are there advantages if we install a drop-in style sink instead of an under-mount?

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    A utility worker clears a downed tree from power lines.

    Preparation key to getting through power outages

    Don't wait until the power goes out to start thinking, "Where's the flashlight?" Recent years have seen a number of strong storms and hurricanes knock out power to suburban and rural homes for days at a time. Here's a refresher on how to be ready:

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    Timothy McCarthy, of Berkeley, Calif., consults a trail map at Point Reyes National Seashore in Marin County, Calif., north of San Francisco, as part of a series of bicycle excursions in Northern California.

    Biking the City by the Bay

    Reveling in the lush green canopy above and savoring the fragrance of eucalyptus trees as we pedaled through the Golden Gate Park Panhandle, we paused for a few moments to take in the scene: San Franciscans young and old wandering by on foot, on bikes or in strollers; balls and Frisbees sailing through the air; friends sipping coffee and chatting. Against this backdrop, our tour guide enlightened us with tidbits of history and local color.

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    Margaret Cronin, a partner with the law firm Leonard, Street and Deinard, and Jim Bendt, president of Travel Beyond, a travel agency which has partnered with the law firm to help clients plan trusts that fund travel as part of an inheritance.

    Trusts can fund future trips for heirs

    Whether it's trying to make sure that their children stay in touch despite geographical distances, or wanting them to become acquainted with family roots in another country, some people are deciding that travel should be a part of their legacy. The trend has even prompted a travel agency and a law firm to partner together this summer to start offering one-stop-shopping for trust creation and travel planning.

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    Summer school students Jack Ausnehmer, left to right, Alondra Ramos, Michael Ausnehmer and Luis Rodriguez help harvest vegetables at London Middle School's garden in Wheeling. The school's garden benefits the food pantries through the Giving Garden program.

    Summer school students cultivate life lessons from gardening

    Teachers and students at London Middle School in Wheeling are tending a garden at the school as part of a project that will benefit area food pantries.

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    Energy audit can identify heat-loss culprits

    Q. First of all, I would like to thank you for suggesting Amteco TWP wood preservative. I just used the TWP 1500 series on my fence, and it turned out great. I hope it lasts for years to come.

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    With ‘friends’ like this, who need enemies?

    Q. I have been dating a wonderful, kind, generous and caring man for almost seven years. For whatever reason, my mother harbors resentment for my partner, and has said she wishes he'd suffer a heart attack and die, among other less-than-friendly sentiments. We see my mother only a handful of times per year, and my partner is cordial to her but relieved when it is time to go.

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    Pianist Daniil Trifonov presents a classical concert at Sunday in Bennett Gordon Hall at Ravinia Festival.

    Sunday picks: Ravinia hosts a day of classical music

    Pianist Daniil Trifonov presents a classical concert including works by Chopin and Debussy in the Bennett Gordon Hall at Ravinia Festival. If Mozart's more your thing, Ravinia hosts an afternoon presentation of “Idomeneo." You can get your Latin music fix as Marc Anthony, Chayanne & Marco A. Solis share a bill at the Allstate Arena. And don't forget about the Air & Water Show if you find yourself in the city today.

Discuss

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    Editorial: Dysfunction in bargaining relationship caused pension crisis

    A Daily Herald editorial expresses little surprise at the lack of progress Friday on public pension reform. When a solution finally is reached, it will be painful for everyone.

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    Tony Borcia gets a hug from older sister Kaeleigh.

    A 10-year-old who loved and was beloved

    Guest columnist James K. Borcia: The suspected killer of my son has been arrested. It seems everyone knows how and why 10-year-old Tony Borcia died, but not nearly enough know how he lived.

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    Walsh is all the GOP stands for
    An Arlington Heights letter to the editor: Congressman Joe Walsh has everything it takes to be one of the best congressmen in the U.S.

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    Walsh’s words only endanger Muslims
    A letter to the editor: There is no radical "strain" of Islam in this country. There are isolated, disaffected extremists who hate in the name of Islam. But the facts show they are few.

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    How will Obama plan improve health care?
    A Huntley letter to the editor: How do higher Medicare costs result in better health care? As well as adding 30 million people to the insured rolls when there aren't enough doctors now?

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    Tax returns are not the story
    An Elgin letter to the editor: Mitt Romney has released all tax records required, and that should be good enough. If he uses every deduction he is entitled to it just proves how smart he is. Why would anyone pay more taxes then required by law?

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    Centegra-Huntley a community effort
    A Crystal Lake letter to the editor: After years of preparation, I am honored to say that Centegra is moving forward with our Centegra Hospital-Huntley project for all of you — our community. The project was just the second hospital in 30 years to receive approval from the Illinois Health Facilities and Services Review Board, and we are proud to be the health system that will bring enhanced health care services to the people of southern McHenry and northern Kane counties.

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    Romney criticism prompts good laugh
    A Carol Stream letter to the editor: I found myself laughing hysterically at the Aug. 5 letter from Mary F. Warren that states, "Mitt Romney, given his history with Bain Capital, is the poster child for such morally challenged predators." She fails to see how such experiences qualify him to lead our country and especially to help solve the myriad of problems we face.

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    Why Obamacare must be repealed
    A Bartlett letter to the editor: Obamacare was pushed through Congress without a majority of the American people's approval and certainly without bipartisan approval. The proof of the people's disapproval was in the 2010 midterm elections when the Republicans won in a landslide.

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    The biggest of many big deals comes to Medinah

    One of the biggest sporting events in the world comes to the suburbs next month. DuPage Editor Jim Davis details why the Ryder Cup is a huge deal to the news department as well as sports.

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