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Daily Archive : Monday August 13, 2012

News

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    The Ryder Cup is a “completely different animal” than the PGA Championship hosted six years ago by Medinah Country Club, Michael Belot, director of the 2012 Ryder Cup, told the Schaumburg Business Association.

    Ryder Cup ‘completely different animal’ to Medinah

    You thought the PGA Championship at Medinah was a big deal six years ago? Just wait until the Ryder Cup rolls into town in next month. "This Ryder Cup is absolutely a completely different animal than the PGA Championship," Michael Belot, director of the 2012 Ryder Cup, said Tuesday to the Schaumburg Business Association.

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    Rose Geijer escorts Titilayo Ewulo and Ariana Woodfork to their first day of kindergarten Monday at Perry School in Carpentersville. Geijer, a paraprofessional, usually works with first graders, but teachers were pitching in all over the school to help the first day go smoothly.

    Why are suburban schools starting so early?

    If it feels like school is starting even earlier than usual this year, it’s not your imagination. For at least 20 years, most suburban schools have opened in August. This year, though, some schools started Monday, and others are opening today and Wednesday, a full three weeks before Labor Day. Mostly, this is a trick of the calendar.

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    ChildServ officials hope to purchase the house that has operated as their Naperville youth home for more than 30 years.

    Lisle Township looks to sell Naperville youth home

    After 34 years in the real estate business, Lisle Township officials say they no longer want to be a landlord. Several township officials said they didn't know until recently they even owned a house at 146 N. Sleight St. in Naperville. But the decision to sell it came quickly after a meeting with city leaders who expressed concern about the number of police calls at the site, which has served as...

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    Alan Roberson

    Aurora siblings get prison for neglect of mother

    Two more Aurora siblings were sentenced to time in prison Monday for the criminal neglect of their ill elderly mother.

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    Police say a homemade bomb was set off outside the College Preparatory School of America in Lombard late Sunday during Ramadan prayer services.

    'Not a comfortable feeling' after second attack on suburban Muslim group

    Leaders at an Islamic school in Lombard where a homemade bomb was detonated during a Ramadan prayer service said increased police patrols might provide peace of mind after a second attack in three days on a suburban Muslim organization. "We were not expecting this but things are going around in different places," said a board member of College Preparatory School of America. "It's not a...

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    Ruth Haley Barton, founder and president of the Transforming Center in Wheaton, has written a book titled “Pursuing God’s Will Together: A Discernment Practice for Leadership Groups.”

    Wheaton Transforming Center helps clergy reconnect with themselves

    Pastors and Christian leaders are supposed to care for the spiritual lives of others, but who cares for their own? After hitting a wall in in her relationship with God while serving on church staff, Ruth Haley Barton began a search for spiritual transformation in her own life and started Transforming Community to minister to other Christian leaders.

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    Gov. Pat Quinn

    Quinn says universities could be target for cuts

    Just days after warning that the state's retirement costs might take money from local schools in the future, Gov. Pat Quinn said that state university budgets could be cut back further if lawmakers don't agree on how to reduce the state's $83 billion pension debt. Quinn's statements come as a coalition of teacher and state employee unions is preparing to release a pensions cost-savings plan later...

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    About 700 people are losing their jobs at Motorola Mobility in Libertyville as part of Google Inc. plans to cut about 4,000 positions from that unit.

    Motorola Mobility loses state incentives over job cuts

    Motorola Mobility, by laying off 700 people at its Libertyville location, is expected to become ineligible for Illinois tax credits awarded last year, a state spokeswoman said. The layoffs are part of about 4,000 job cuts worldwide, owner Google Inc. said.

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    Lawmakers are set to meet under the Illinois Capitol dome Friday to talk about Illinois’ pension debt once again, but some believe the issue will linger past November’s election.

    How will the pension fight affect campaigns?

    The lengthy, consuming fight over retirement benefits for public workers is likely to affect campaigns for office in Springfield this November, but as the debate could continue until Election Day — and afterward — leaders of both parties across the state disagree how. “It all depends on who’s the best spinner,” said Paul Green, director of the Institute for Politics...

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    An ambulance leaves the Indiana State Fair Coliseum after a stage coach overturned at the Indiana State Fair Sunday.

    1 hospitalized overnight from Indiana fair stagecoach crash

    Officials say one person remained hospitalized overnight after being hurt when a stagecoach tipped over before an Indiana State Fair horse show. Fair spokesman Andy Klotz says five people were taken to a hospital with minors injuries after the crash Sunday afternoon inside the Pepsi Coliseum.

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    Bone marrow drives are real life savers

    Matthew Devine's life was saved by a bone marrow transplant from his own mother, but experts say family matches only occur in 30 percent of the cases. That's why the Burlinis and Devines urge people to get tested. "So many people are not aware of how to do it," Sue Ellen Burlini says. "Testing is simply a swab with a Q-tip in the inner cheek."

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    Glenbard Dist. 87 so far supports scoreboard ads

    Glenbard High School District 87 is a step closer to attaching scrolling LED advertising panels to existing indoor and outdoor scoreboards at its four campuses, a move that could collect up to $100,000 annually. Not everyone is fully in favor of the program, though. "I am concerned from a societal standpoint that we are getting sucked into this dollar vortex of sports in this country," board...

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    The pending Corporate Reserve project on St. Charles’ west side may be in jeopardy following new criticism from city officials who will determine if the plan goes forward.

    St. Charles’ Corporate Reserve plan hits more snags

    Conflicts with St. Charles' long-term plans and desire for affordable housing arose as possible deal-killers for the Corporate Reserve project on the city's western border.

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    Barrington, surrounding fire district examine a break-up

    The long-standing relationship between the Barrington Countryside Fire Protection District and the village of Barrington is on the fritz, and officials are discussing the possibility of parting ways. Fire district officials say they want more contractual flexibility to, on their own dime, hire more personnel and buy more equipment. "Right now, we're hamstrung," Barrington Countryside President...

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    Roselle to hire development consultant on trial basis

    Roselle officials on Monday directed staff to hire a business development consultant on a trial basis, but they were divided on whether it's the right thing to do. Two trustees argued the village shouldn't give incentives to developers, while Village President Gayle Smolinski said "He's proven himself in other communities."

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    Police reports
    Monica M. Cruz, 30, of the 400 block of Franklin Street in Elgin, appeared in bond court Friday on a felony charge of theft of jewelry in June from her brother-in-law's home, according to court documents and police reports. Cruz is charged with stealing gold jewelry worth up to $10,000 that she told police she sold to a pawnshop for about $900, reports said. Bail was set at $5,000, of which Cruz...

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    Tri-Cities police reports
    Natalie N. Teruel, 34, of Sugar Grove, was arrested Saturday on a warrant charging her with felony aggravated driving under the influence of alcohol and obstructing justice, according to a police report.

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    Teens charged with smashing mailboxes in Bartlett

    Four 18-year-olds have been charged in connection to a vandalism spree that damaged about 20 mailboxes and a vehicle in Bartlett, according to police.

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    Merriam-Webster drops the F-bomb — and 99 other new words

    The term "F-bomb" first surfaced in newspapers more than 20 years ago but only landed in the mainstream Merriam-Webster's Collegiate Dictionary on Tuesday, along with sexting, flexitarian, obesogenic, energy drink and life coach.

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    Jesse Jackson Jr.

    Jackson Jr. diagnosed with bipolar disorder

    U.S. Rep. Jesse Jackson Jr., a Chicago Democrat who took a hushed medical leave two months ago, is being treated for bipolar disorder, the Mayo Clinic announced Monday. The Rochester, Minn.-based clinic specified his condition as Bipolar II, which is defined as periodic episodes of depression and hypomania, a less serious form of mania.

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    Three die in Texas shooting

    A Texas law enforcement officer attacked as he brought an eviction notice to a house was among three people, including a shooter inside the home, killed Monday near the Texas A&M University campus. A 65-year-old man was the third person killed in the shootings at an off-campus home not far from the university's football stadium, College Station Assistant Police Chief Scott McCollum said. Three...

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    Andrew Wiegand of Crystal Lake has been charged with setting five McHenry County barns on fire, which caused more than $1 million in damage to the structures, according to police.

    Crystal Lake teens charged in fires totaling $1 million in damage

    Two 17-year-old Crystal Lake residents have been linked to at least five rural McHenry County barn fires that caused a total of more than $1 million in damages, according to the sheriff's department. Police said the teens started the fires over a two month period out of boredom.

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    Chambers offer students chance to develop and start businesses

    A national program teaching high school students how to start and run their own businesses with the help of local business owners is expanding this year in the Northwest suburbs. The Young Entrepreneurs Academy — a yearlong program also known as YEA! that was started in 2004 — will be offered in Mount Prospect, Palatine and Des Plaines through those communities' chambers of commerce,...

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    Christopher Vaughn

    Jury selection begins in 2007 family killings

    Jury selection has started in Will County for the trial of an Oswego man charged with shooting to death his wife and three children five years ago. Prosecutors are likely to begin calling witnesses in Christopher Vaughn's trial next week.

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    Luis Espinosa

    Naperville teen charged in Friday burglaries

    One of two teens arrested Friday on suspicion of residential burglary has been charged as an adult. Naperville police Sgt. Gregg Bell said Luis Espinosa, 17, of the 3000 block of Bar Harbor Ct., has been charged with residential burglary and attempted residential burglary and remains in Will County jail on $200,000 bond.

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    Second lawsuit against fired Des Plaines cop, city

    A recently fired Des Plaines cop has been named in a second federal lawsuit alleging he and other city police officers violated the rights of a city resident by falsely arresting her after her husband was detained on a drug-related offense. The lawsuit claims Des Plaines officers arrested the woman without cause.

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    D. Dewey Pierotti

    Cronin, Pierotti quietly huddle, then scuttle county-forest merger

    A secret, top-level meeting was held between DuPage County Board Chairman Dan Cronin and forest preserve district President D. Dewey Pierotti on the possible undoing of a decade-old split between their two entities. Yet both now say they're not in favor of re-creating a combined county and forest preserve agency.

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    Lynn Cameron

    Charges pending for Algonquin mom who left daughter at bar

    An Algonquin mom who drove her 19-year-old developmentally disabled daughter to Tennessee and left her in a bar June 28 before driving home is facing the prospect of felony charges in Campbell County, Tenn. A grand jury convened Friday to consider charges against Eva Cameron of flagrant nonsupport of a child and willful neglect and exploitation of an impaired adult, according to Assistant...

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    Community yard sale:

    The Community Action Partnership of Lake County hosts its first community yard sale from 7 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 25, at 1200 Glen Flora Ave., Waukegan.

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    Aquatic club holding tryouts:

    The Patriot Aquatic Club will hold tryouts for new members Aug. 21-22 at Stevenson High School in Lincolnshire.

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    Route 21/137 lane closures:

    The northbound outside lane of Milwaukee Avenue (Route 21) will be closed for two weeks beginning Tuesday from Adler Park School to Cater Lane, just north of Route 137 in Libertyville.

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    A red-tailed hawk leaves its perch after having a bite to eat on top of a Libertyville lamppost Monday morning.

    Full extension
    A red-tailed hawk leaves its perch after having a bite to eat on top of a Libertyville lamp post Monday morning.

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    The Arlington Heights Park District has already installed new field turf on two of its four baseball and softball fields at Melas Park in Mount Prospect. Officials say the new turf will offer a safer playing surface while also reducing rainouts.

    Synthetic turf coming to Melas Park fields

    The Arlington Heights Park District is about halfway done installing new synthetic field turf on the baseball and softball fields at Melas Park, officials said. The infields on all four baseball and softball fields at the park, 1500 Central Road, will be replaced by the end of October, said John Robinson, the district's superintendent of recreation.

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    Money’s tight to keep transit in a state of good repair, RTA officials say.

    RTA chief urges businesses to emphasize transit

    All the angsting over passing a two-year transportation funding was a dress rehearsal. Now it's time to gear up for another full-court press to get more money for transit capital needs from the feds, RTA Executive Director Joe Costello tells Naperville business leaders.

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    Don Schlomann

    Lawsuit may still undo D303 grade level centers

    The revival of a lawsuit may yet undo St. Charles Unit District 303's conversion of Davis and Richmond elementary schools into grade level centers. Parents in the lawsuit argued the grade level center plan amounted to a "school improvement plan" as defined by No Child Left Behind and the Illinois school code. School district officials said the switch to grade level centers was not a school...

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    MTV’s “MADE” teen life coach Jeff Yalden speaks to students at Jacobs High School in Algonquin on the first day of school Monday.

    Speaker encourages Jacobs students to grow up and take responsibility

    Youth motivational speaker Jeff Yalden pumped students up for the new school year in Community Unit District 300 during a special assembly at Jacobs High School in Algonquin. "Don't be afraid this year to challenge yourself," Yalden said. Monday is the first day of class in Carpentersville-based Community Unit District 300.

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    Bartlett to discuss electrical aggregation

    The Bartlett village board will hold a special meeting at 7 p.m. Tuesday, Aug. 14 to discuss electrical aggregation. The meeting will take place at village hall, 228 S. Main St.

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    “Beauty and the Beast” auditions:

    An audition call for fourth to ninth graders for the Broadway musical classic, Beauty and the Beast will be held from 4 to 8 p.m. Thursday, Aug. 23 at the Improv Playhouse Theater, 735 N. Milwaukee Ave., Libertyville.

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    Hoffman Estates man gets probation for attacking cabbie

    A Hoffman Estates man involved in an altercation last December that left a taxi driver with a broken jaw and teeth pleaded guilty to aggravated battery. In exchange for Richard Olson's guilty plea to the class 3 felony, a Cook County judge sentenced the 23-year-old to 24 months probation and 30 days of community service and ordered Olson to submit to random drug tests.

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    Ellen Correll

    Hot weather plans for schools without air conditioning at District 46

    Grayslake Elementary District 46 has formed a plan on how to deal with extraordinarly hot weather at two schools without air conditioning. District 46's Meadowview and Woodview elementary schools in Grayslake don't have air conditioning. Both schools serve students in kindergarten through fourth grade.

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    In this July 26, 2012 file photo, Attorney General Eric Holder speaks in the Cabinet Room of the White House in Washington. The Republican-run House has asked a federal court to enforce a subpoena against Attorney General Eric Holder. The subpoena demands that Holder produce records related to a bungled gun-tracking operation known as Operation Fast and Furious. The failure of Holder and House Republicans to work out a deal on the documents led to a vote in June that held the attorney general in contempt of Congress.

    House files suit against Holder over Fast and Furious records

    The Republican-run House on Monday asked a federal court to enforce a subpoena against Attorney General Eric Holder, demanding that he produce records on a bungled gun-tracking operation known as Operation Fast and Furious. The lawsuit asked the court to reject a claim by President Barack Obama asserting executive privilege, a legal position designed to protect certain internal administration...

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    This Jan. 24, 1996 file photo shows Cosmopolitan Editor-in-Chief Helen Gurley Brown holding an issue of the magazine before a Waldorf-Astoria ceremony where she was honored with a Henry Johnson Fisher Award for lifetime achievement in the magazine industry in New York. Brown, longtime editor of Cosmopolitan magazine, died Monday, Aug. 13, 2012 at a hospital in New York after a brief hospitalization. She was 90.

    Cosmo editor Helen Gurley Brown dies at 90

    Helen Gurley Brown, the longtime editor of Cosmopolitan magazine who invited millions of women to join the sexual revolution, has died. She was 90. Brown died Monday at a hospital in New York after a brief hospitalization, Hearst CEO Frank A. Bennack, Jr. said in a statement. "Sex and the Single Girl," her grab-bag book of advice, opinion, and anecdote on why being single shouldn't mean being...

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    This undated file photo provided by California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation shows convicted killer Gregory Powell. Powell, who was convicted of killing a Los Angeles police officer during an infamous kidnapping in 1963 that inspired Joseph Wambaugh’s true-life crime novel “The Onion Field,” has died in a California prison. He was 79.

    ‘Onion Field’ killer dies in prison

    Gregory Powell, who was convicted of killing a Los Angeles police officer during an infamous kidnapping that inspired the true crime book "The Onion Field," has died in prison at age 79, authorities said Monday. Powell died late Sunday in a hospice at the California Medical Facility, a men's prison in the Northern California city of Vacaville, according to the California Department of Corrections...

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    Because of several broken vertebrae and a shattered ankle, Francisco Valdez is unable to work and is losing the home he built with his own hands.

    Donors' $12K to family devastated by drunk driver not enough

    More than $12,000 has been donated to the Francisco Valdez and his family since May, but it was not enough to save their Hampshire home from foreclosure and a sale last month. Valdez was severely injured and his four kids hurt when he was hit head-on by an uninsured drunk driver on Christmas Eve 2008 while en route to visit his wife in the hospital. She had a stroke a month earlier. The family is...

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    Three kangaroos (not these three) fled a German zoo after a fox dug a hole into their enclosure. Only one remains at large.

    "All together now, tie me kangaroo down sport, tie me kangaroo down"

    It might sound like a typical joke -- A fox, a wild boar and a kangaroo walk into a bar -- but there's really no bar in the story, just a missing kangaroo aided in his flight from a German zoo by a wily fox and a hard-digging boar. Zookeepers say it was an inside job that started from the outside.

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    Robert G. Westrom

    Longtime West Chicago business owner, civic leader dies

    Longtime West Chicago resident Robert Westrom is being remembered as a caring and devoted man after dying Thursday at the age of 87. Westrom, among other community projects, pushed for the creation of the West Chicago Fire Protection District.

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    Blake Maley and Matthew Devine with some of the toys the drive collected.

    Scout’s toy drive gives ‘Matthew’s Mission’ a boost

    Arlington Hts. Scout Blake Maley and Boy Scout Troop 140 collected more than 600 toys for the pediatric oncology unit of Ann and Robert H. Lurie's Children's Hospital -- spurred by the story of Matthew Devine, the grandson of Blake's neighbor, Sue Ellen Burlini. "It was pretty big," says Blake, who starts his freshman year at Buffalo Grove High School this week. "The response was much bigger than...

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    Todd Mandoline

    Villa Park man pleads not guilty to girlfriend’s arson murder

    A Villa Park man formally pleaded not guilty Monday to setting a July 22 fire in Lombard that killed his former girlfriend. Todd Mandoline, 23, is charged with first-degree murder, aggravated arson and criminal damage to property in the death of Paula Morgan. He could face natural life in prison if convicted, prosecutors said.

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    Sightings of evening grosbeak, a large finch, are rare in the Chicago region. This male was photographed this summer in Grayling, Michigan.

    Vacation, birding go hand in hand

    Roll your eyes and turn the page if you must, it's time for the annual "what I did on my summer vacation" column by our Jeff Reiter. It's in his DNA: he travels, he watches birds, he takes notes. This time, the Pacific Northwest, in late June and early July. Some pre-trip research suggested it was not the "birdiest" time of the year to visit the region, but visiting some new avian scenery is...

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    Local nonprofits need online votes to win $25,000

    The United Way of Elgin and South Elgin's Anderson Animal Shelter beat out 80 other Chicago nonprofits to make it to the top 10 in the Blackman Kallick Plante Moran Chicago Community Champions contest. They are now counting on supporters to help them win $25,000 by voting early and often online. Voting is open now through noon Friday.

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    A victim of Saturday’s earthquake sits on the ruins of buildings at the village of Bajebaj near the city of Varzaqan in northwestern Iran, Sunday. Twin earthquakes in Iran have killed at least 250 people and injured more than 2,000, Iranian state television said on Sunday.

    Iran villages in rubble as quake death toll rises

    On Monday Iran raised its earthquake death toll to 306, a day after rescuers called off the search for survivors from the rubble of their homes in the country's northwest, state media reported. Health Minister Marzieh Vahid Dastjerdi told a session of parliament that the number jumped by about 50 after victims died in the hospital.

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    Progress made on Calif. wildfire threatening town

    Crews made progress overnight against a Northern California wildfire that has grown to more than 4½ square miles and forced the evacuation of hundreds of homes.

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    The Olympic flag is handed from London Mayor Boris Johnson, left, to the International Olympic Committee President Jacques Rogge during the closing ceremony of the 2012 Summer Olympics on Sunday in London.

    Back to reality: Britain bounces back after games

    Basking in post-Olympic glory, Britain succumbed to reality Monday with commuters venturing back to work and Heathrow Airport experiencing one of its busiest days ever. Some 116,000 people were expected to leave Monday from Heathrow, London's busiest hub, an exodus that includes some 6,000 athletes and Prime Minister David Cameron going on his vacation. Heathrow usually handles about 95,000...

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    Afghan Police officers inspect the wreckage of vehicle after a bomb explosion in the city of Jalalabad east of Kabul, Afghanistan, Monday. At least five civilians were injured as a bomb targeting a government employees’ bus went off Monday morning, a police source said.

    New Afghan police attack on NATO forces; no deaths

    An Afghan policeman opened fire on NATO forces and Afghan soldiers Monday in the fifth attack reported in a week by Afghan security forces on their international partners. The U.S.-led military coalition says none of its service members were killed.

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    Syrian pilot ejects, rebels say they downed plane

    Syrian state-run media said Monday a pilot ejected from a warplane after a technical failure while rebels claimed they shot it down over an eastern province where the opposition has a strong presence.

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    110-year-old Pa. widow gets WWI benefits boost

    A 110-year-old Pennsylvania widow is getting a benefits boost because of her husband's World War I service. Family members say Alda Collins is now getting about $1,000 a month to assist with her stay at a nursing home near Ebensburg. She had been getting $36 a month.

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    Adams County man is the focus of a Civil War book

    The century-old letters and journals of an Adams County native are the focus of a new Civil War book. The Quincy Herald-Whig reports the accounts of Lewis F. Roe provide a first-hand view of the day-to-day activities of Civil War soldiers and the dangers they faced in battle.

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    Ill. hiker rescued in Grand Teton National Park

    An Illinois man had to be rescued in Grand Teton National Park after becoming debilitated on Teewinot Mountain.

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    Navy Week gets under way in Chicago

    This is Navy Week in Chicago, and visitors to Navy Pier will get an up-close look at some Navy warships.The ships are on their first scheduled cruise in the Great Lakes since 1999, and they'll be docked at Navy Pier for tours.

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    Searchers looking for boater off Wind Point

    A search and rescue crew is looking for a missing boater in Lake Michigan off Racine County's Wind Point.

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    GOP Presidential nominee Mitt Romney and his newly chosen VP running mate Paul Ryan, left, talk with Bob Schieffer of “60 Minutes” on CBS Sunday. Ryan will meet voters at the Iowa State Fair this week.

    In new role, Ryan faces Obama in Iowa

    Newly tapped Republican vice presidential contender Paul Ryan is facing off against President Barack Obama as the front lines in the battle for the White House shift to Iowa.

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    Displaced North Korean women, left homeless by July flooding, walk among temporary tents set up in their destroyed neighborhood in Ungok, North Korea, on Monday. Floods killed at least 169 North Koreans nationwide and destroyed tens of thousands of homes.

    N. Koreans recount terror when flood engulfed hamlet

    The threat of floods is nothing new to Ungok, North Korea, which sits in a valley where four rivers converge. But this year's rains were the worst in recent memory, villagers said Monday, many standing on the rocky dirt where their homes once stood.

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    Belarus’ Nadzeya Ostapchuk became the first athlete to be stripped of a medal at the London Olympics after her gold in the women’s shot put was withdrawn for doping. The International Olympic Committee said Monday that Ostapchuk tested positive for the steroid metenolone.

    Belarus shot putter stripped of Olympic gold

    Shot putter Nadzeya Ostapchuk of Belarus became the first athlete to be stripped of a medal at the London Olympics after her gold was withdrawn Monday for doping.

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    Pope’s butler, 2nd layman face trial in theft case

    A Vatican judge on Monday ordered the pope's butler and a fellow lay employee to stand trial in the scandal of pilfered documents from Pope Benedict XVI's private apartment. The indictment accused Paolo Gabriele, the butler under arrest at the Vatican since May, of grand theft.

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    Norway: Report blasts police response to massacre

    A Norwegian commission has criticized authorities for failing to take actions that could have prevented or interrupted the bomb and gun attacks by a far-right fanatic that killed 77 people last year.

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    Rabid beaver attacks N.Y. man swimming in Pa. river

    PINE PLAINS, N.Y. — A Boy Scout leader from New York who was attacked by a rabid beaver while swimming in the Delaware River is recovering.The Poughkeepsie Journal reports that 51-year-old Normand Brousseau, of Pine Plains, was swimming in eastern Pennsylvania on Aug. 2 when a beaver swam through his legs and bit him in the chest.

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    Pa. woman accused of killing fiance on wedding day

    An eastern Pennsylvania woman who was supposed to be spending her first full day as a newlywed was instead in jail Sunday, accused of killing her fiance hours before they were to get married, authorities said.

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    Penn State trustees back president on NCAA action

    They didn't take a formal vote, but the vast majority of Penn State trustees voiced support for the university president's acceptance of severe penalties imposed by the NCAA over the school's handling of a child molestation scandal.

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    Agency probes JFK security breach by man from bay

    A man on a personal watercraft who became stranded in a New York bay easily breached Kennedy Airport's security system by walking undetected through two runways and into a terminal.

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    Megan Siebert at the National History Day contest ceremony.

    Barrington teen is Illinois winner in national essay contest

    Megan Siebert of Barrington is the Illinois winner of the National World War II Museum's "Salute to Freedom" essay contest. She won a trip to New Orleans next January for the grand opening of the U.S. Freedom Pavilion. The 13-year-old is a student at the Science & Arts Academy in Des Plaines.

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    Dawn Patrol: Arlington Hts. woman killed; woman tried luring boys

    Arlington Heights woman is killed in crash in McHenry County. Geneva police seek woman who tried to lure two boys downtown. Two Carpentersville trustees missed 21% of meetings. Jordan Danks is set down to the minors.

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    Technicality gives convicted Elgin drug dealer a break

    An Elgin man convicted in summer 2010 of selling cocaine near a church could have his sentence reduced after successfully appealing the most serious charges in his case.

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    iLLest Vocals featuring Sanu John,25, of Skokie and Shawn Kurian, 25, of Wheeling were named the winners of Suburban Chicago’s Got Talent.

    Weekend in Review: Talent winners; Olympics end

    What you may have missed over the weekend: Foster, Biggert spar over tax cut extension; new Grayslake police chief talks about his job; beat-box duo wins Suburban Chicago's Got Talent; former Chicago fire commissioner now deputy chief in Carol Stream: evangelist Billy Graham hospitalized; suburban GOP happy with VP pick; potato chip preferences vary by region; McIlroy wins PGA Championship:...

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    Is the 110 mph train planned for a Chicago-to-St. Louis route all that “high speed” compared to to Japan’s 200 mph Shinkansen bullet trains? That’s one question being asked about Illinois’ plans for high-speed rail.

    Love high-speed rail? Hate it? Here’s your chance to opine

    Are five more daily trips and a shorter time to get from Chicago to St. Louis worth $3 billion? Is 110 mph really “high-speed” compared to the 200 mph bullet trains of Asia? What suburb will serve as a stop along the route? Plus, readers bash early train station closings, a big bike tour with prizes and traffic hotspots.

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    Christine Grobart, holds, son, Tim, 5, of Lombard, who is now back at home and active after a successful heart transplant.

    Images: The Week In Pictures
    This edition of The Week In Pictures features a bike race, festivals, a Mitt Romney visit, and a dog saved by its owner.

Sports

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    Nationals enjoy highest-scoring game of year vs Giants

    Kurt Suzuki drove in four runs, Danny Espinosa and Roger Bernadina each knocked in three and the Washington Nationals routed the San Francisco Giants 14-2 Monday night in a matchup of NL division leaders.

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    Masterson silences Angels in Indians’ 6-2 win

    Justin Masterson pitched shutout ball into the seventh inning and the Cleveland Indians bounced back from their most lopsided loss of the season to beat the sputtering Los Angeles Angels 6-2 Monday night in the opener of a 10-game road trip.

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    Upton leads Rays to 4-1 win over Mariners

    Justin Upton hit a two-run homer and Alex Cobb pitched seven strong innings to help the Tampa Bay Rays to their season-high seventh consecutive win, 4-1 over the Seattle Mariners on Monday night.

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    The Cubs’ Darwin Barney celebrates with teammate Starlin Castro after hitting a 2-run home run against the Houston Astros in the second inning Monday night. The Cubs won 7-1.

    Sveum mixing, matching Cubs lineup

    Look for the Cubs' starting lineup to be a work in progress for the rest of the season. In Monday night's game against the Houston Astros, manager Dale Sveum started rookie Josh Vitters at third base and batted him second. Other than a few spots, there will be very few constants in the Cubs' lineup.

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    Bears quarterback Jay Cutler was held out of last week’s preseason opener against the Denver Broncos.

    Cutler confident in Bears’ offensive line

    Bears offensive coordinator Mike Tice says he loses sleep worrying about the offensive line protecting Jay Cutler, but that's probably not what will be keeping the Bears' quarterback up nights. "I've got a couple reasons to lose sleep; I've got a baby, I've got all kinds of stuff going on," said Cutler, whose son was born Wednesday. "But they're going to be fine. Protection wise, we're going to do what we have to protect myself or whoever's in there. "If we have to keep eight in there, if we have to keep nine in there, that's what we're going to do. We're not going to put those guys in positions where they're going to fail or I'm going to get hit. We would like them to step up and be able to block 4-on-4, 5-on-5, but we'll see how it goes."

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    Monday’s girls golf scoreboard
    High school varsity results from Monday's girls golf meets, as reported to the Daily Herald.

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    Monday’s boys golf scoreboard
    High school varsity results from Monday's boys golf meets, as reported to the Daily Herald.

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    Jimenex, Kernels clip Cougars

    Cedar Rapids starter Eswarlin Jimenez shut down Kane County through 8 innings, and the host Kernels knocked off the Cougars 5-1 on Monday night at Veterans Memorial Stadium.

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    LeMahieu’s 4 hits leads Rockies past Brewers 9-6 LeMahieu’s 4 hits leads Rockies past Brewers 9-6

    DENVER — DJ LeMahieu had a career-best four hits, Jeff Francis pitched effectively into the sixth inning and the Colorado Rockies beat the Milwaukee Brewers 9-6 on Monday night.Dexter Fowler, Eric Young Jr., Tyler Colvin and Chris Nelson each had two hits of Colorado’s 15 hits. Every position player for the Rockies had at least one hit as they ended a four-game home losing streak.Carlos Gomez homered among his three hits and Rickie Weeks also homered for the Brewers.Milwaukee starter Mike Fiers couldn’t duplicate his outing on Tuesday when was perfect through six innings against Cincinnati.Fiers (6-5) showed none of that sharpness in losing for the first time since July 22. He came into the game 2-0 with a 1.93 ERA in August but was hit hard early.The Rockies started the game with three consecutive hits and took a 3-0 lead. They tacked on another run in the second before blowing it open in a four-run third.The first six Colorado batters got hits in the inning, with Fiers giving up the first four. He left after Colvin’s RBI double made it 6-0.Mike McClendon came on and allowed RBI singles to Nelson and LeMahieu that pushed the lead to 8-0.Fiers allowed eight runs on nine hits and struck out one in two-plus innings. It was his shortest start of the season and the first time this year he failed to go at least five innings.The Brewers got one back in the fourth on Corey Hart’s RBI grounder. Gomez hit a two-run homer — his 11th — in the sixth to make it 8-3 and chase Francis.Francis (4-4) allowed three runs on six hits, walked two and struck out two in 5 1-3 innings. He picked up his first win since beating Arizona on July 25.LeMahieu’s RBI single in the seventh— his fourth hit of the game — made it 9-3.Weeks hit a three-run home run off Will Harris in the ninth. It was his 13th of the season.NOTES: Rockies C Wilin Rosario allowed his 14th passed ball of the season, a club record. ... Brewers RHP Mark Rogers stayed home to await the delivery of his child. Rogers is scheduled to pitch Wednesday. ... Rockies RHP Jhoulys Chacin (pectoral injury) and LHP Jorge De La Rosa (elbow surgery) threw successful bullpen sessions Monday. Chacin is scheduled to start for Triple-A Colorado Springs on Thursday. ... Milwaukee LHP Randy Wolf (3-8) will face Colorado RHP Tyler Chatwood (2-2) on Tuesday.

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    Deduno pitches Twins past struggling Tigers 9-3

    Darin Mastroianni and Ryan Doumit each homered and drove in three runs, Samuel Deduno baffled the struggling Detroit Tigers for seven innings and the Minnesota Twins snapped a four-game losing streak with a 9-3 victory Monday night.

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    Chicago White Sox’s Paul Konerko is on major-league baseball’s seven-day disabled list and is eligible to come off Friday, when the Sox open a three-game series at Kansas City. “Once he starts doing baseball stuff they’re going to check him after that to make sure that stuff goes away,” manager Robin Ventura said. “Right now just slow stuff and rest. That was the key to the first four days, make sure he didn’t do anything.”

    White Sox’ Konerko cleared by doctors

    Out with a concussion, White Sox captain Paul Konerko was put through a series of tests Monday and cleared to resume physical activity. "Everything is looking good," manager Robin Ventura told reporters in Toronto. Konerko is expected to gradually build up before returning to the Sox' lineup. He's eligible to come off the seven-day disabled list on Friday.

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    Chicago Cubs starter Jeff Samardzija delivers a pitch against the Houston Astros in the first inning during a baseball game Monday in Chicago.

    Samardzija strikes out 11, Cubs beat Astros 7-1

    Jeff Samardzija struck out a career high-tying 11 in seven innings and the Chicago Cubs beat the Houston Astros 7-1 on Monday night. Darwin Barney and Alfonso Soriano hit two-run homers and Anthony Rizzo had four hits for the Cubs.

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    White Sox’s Adam Dunn celebrates a home run against the Toronto Blue Jays during the fourth inning of a baseball game Monday in Toronto.

    Cooper’s single gives Jays 3-2 win over White Sox

    David Cooper singled home the winning run in the 11th inning as the Toronto Blue Jays beat the Chicago White Sox 3-2 on Monday night.

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    Cubs reliever Carlos Marmol received a vote of confidence from manager Dale Sveum, who said, “Knock on wood, he’s been as good as anybody in baseball since he’s been back in the closing role and the save opportunities he’s had.”

    Sveum: Marmol is our closer

    The Cubs did some roster maneuvering Monday, calling up Waubonsie Valley High School grad Michael Bowden and sending lefty Brooks Raley to Iowa. Bowden goes to the bullpen while Raley likely will come back up Saturday to start one of the games in the day-night doubleheader at Cincinnati.

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    Fires ready for Arlington’s Jockey Challenge this year

    In last year's Jockey Challenge Race on Arlington Million weekend, legendary rider Earlie Fires just missed getting to the winner's circle, finishing second for the second straight time. "I probably should have won that race last year but I wasn't fit enough," Fires admitted recently. Well, the 65-year-old isn't taking any chances heading into Friday's third running of the event.

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    Hamels throws 2nd straight shutout for Phillies

    Cole Hamels pitched his second consecutive shutout for the Philadelphia Phillies in a 4-0 win over the Miami Marlins on Monday night. Hamels, coming off a five-hitter against Atlanta last Tuesday, scattered seven hits and struck out five in his sixth career shutout and 12th complete game. He walked one and threw 85 of 113 pitches for strikes.

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    Victorino powers Dodgers past Pirates, 5-4

    Shane Victorino hit his 10th homer of the season and drove in three runs to lift the Los Angeles Dodgers to a 5-4 victory over the Pittsburgh Pirates on Monday night Matt Kemp added two hits for the Dodgers, who moved within 1½ games of the Pirates for one of the two National League wild card spots.

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    St. Viator’s Renner rises to the task

    Robert Renner didn't let the soggy beginning to the boys prep golf season bother him in the slightest. As a matter of fact, he relished the conditions. "I enjoy playing in the rain," said the St. Viator junior after firing a spectacular 2-under par 70 to take medalist honors in less-than-stellar conditions at the Rolling Green Invitational in Arlington Heights.

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    Walsh name remains a winner

    When we last left the high school girls golf scene, Prospect's Allison Walsh was being crowned the 2011 IHSA Class AA state champion. On the first day of the 2012 season, Allison's little sister Kiley made sure the Walsh name was still in the headlines. Despite playing in relentless showers Monday at the Fox Run Golf Course in Elk Grove, Kiley Walsh fired a 3-over par 73 to claim top honors in Conant's Early Bird Invite while helping the defending state champion Knights to the low score of 311. Prospect finished well ahead of runner-up Fremd (330), Prairie Ridge (335), Glenbrook North (352) and Buffalo Grove (353).

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    Stults keep Padres rolling in 4-1 win over Braves

    Eric Stults combined with two relievers on a five-hitter, Chase Headley homered and drove in two runs and the San Diego Padres beat the Atlanta Braves 4-1 on Monday night. Stults (3-2) gave up five hits and one run in 7 2-3 innings — his longest start in three years. While with the Dodgers, Stults beat the Giants 8-0 on May 9, 2009, his last complete game.

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    Swisher’s slam helps Yankees beat Rangers

    Nick Swisher hit a grand slam off Ryan Dempster and drove in five runs, Derek Lowe closed with four shutout innings in his Yankees debut and New York beat the Texas Rangers 8-2 Monday night.

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    Tiger Woods watches his drive from the sixth tee during the final round of the PGA Championship golf tournament Sunday on the Ocean Course of the Kiawah Island Golf Resort in Kiawah Island, S.C.

    Rory McIlroy vs Tiger Woods vs Jack Nicklaus

    In the wake of the PGA Championship, Mike North asks: Who will end up with more major wins in the years to come Rory McIlroy or Tiger Woods? With all the new young players emerging, it can be anyone's game.

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    Jeff Sluman

    Jeff Sluman, Scott Verplank named assistant Ryder Cup captains

    Longtime Hinsdale resident Jeff Sluman, along with fellow PGA pro Scott Verplank, were named assistant captains of the U.S. Ryder Cup team Monday by captain Davis Love III."It's nice to have a local with Jeff and Linda Sluman right there in town," Love said from a press conference at Kiawah Island, S.C. "And Jeff and I spent a lot of time in Wales (in 2010) talking about this Ryder Cup already."He's been a big supporter of mine over the last two years, and it's great that we added he and Scott Verplank to our team. We're excited and ready to go."

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    Angelo still might determine Bears’ destiny

    The Bears' most important person this season isn't even with the team anymore. Jerry Angelo, former GM. As much as Phil Emery's acquisitions have improved the skill positions on offense, success depends on the line. And the guys on the line? The five players who started on the line in the preseason opener are leftovers from Angelo's tenure.

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    Bears offensive coordinator Mike Tice says he will have trouble sleeping at night until he knows that his line can protect quarterback Jay Cutler, right.

    Tice wants to see more from Bears’ O-line

    Yes, the developments at left tackle have been disappointing. But it's not as if the Bears are lining up five Pillsbury Doughboys in front of quarterback Jay Cutler, even though it may have appeared that way in Thursday's preseason-opening 31-3 loss to the Denver Broncos.

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    Former Wauconda pitcher Rich Mascheri had his contract purchased by the New York Yankees. The pitcher was a Frontier League all-star this summer.

    Wauconda’s Mascheri signed by Yankees

    Rich Mascheri's baseball season keeps getting better. The Wauconda native, who signed with the Normal CornBelters after graduating from Western Illinois in May and in July was selected to play in the Frontier League all-star game, has signed with the New York Yankees.

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    In this April 20, 2012, file photo, Boston Red Sox great Johnny Pesky, center, is greeted by former player Nomar Garciaparra, left, and others during a celebration of the 100th anniversary of the first regular-season baseball game at Fenway Park prior to the Red Sox taking on the New York Yankees in Boston. Pesky, who spent most of his 60-plus years in pro baseball with the Red Sox and was beloved by the team’s fans, has died on Monday, Aug. 13, 2012, in Danvers, Mass. He was 92.

    Pesky Pole’s namesake dead at 92

    BOSTON — Johnny Pesky, who spent most of his 60-plus years in pro baseball with the Boston Red Sox and was beloved by the team's fans, has died. He was 92.Pesky died Monday at the Kaplan Family Hospice House in Danvers, according to Solimine, Landergan and Richardson funeral home in Lynn. The funeral home did not have a cause of death.Pesky appeared at Fenway Park on April 20 when the Red Sox celebrated the 100th anniversary of the ballpark. The team invited all its former players back, and Pesky was moved to tears at the pregame ceremony."I've had a good life with the ballclub," Pesky told The Associated Press in 2004. "I just try to help out. I understand the game, I've been around the ballpark my whole life."Pesky, a lifetime .307 hitter, was a player, manager, broadcaster, and most recently a special instructor for Boston. Unofficially, he was the club's goodwill ambassador.Until the past several years, he seemed ever present at the Red Sox spring training camp in Fort Myers, Fla., and at Fenway, where he always had a few minutes to chat with fans and still had knowledge to impart to players well into his 80s.His legacy is a permanent part of Fenway with the Pesky Pole the right-field foul pole.He also was a teammate and friend of Hall of Famer Ted Williams, who died in 2002.Yet even though Pesky was a favorite of generations of players and fans, he still had his own place of notoriety in Red Sox history, a place that many think is undeserved.Pesky was often blamed for holding the ball for a split second as Enos Slaughter made his famous "Mad Dash" from first base to score the winning run for the St. Louis Cardinals against the Red Sox in Game 7 of the 1946 World Series.With the score tied 3-3, Slaughter opened the bottom of the eighth inning with a single. With two outs, Harry Walker hit the ball to center field. Pesky, playing shortstop, took the cutoff throw from outfielder Leon Culberson, and according to some newspaper accounts, hesitated before throwing home. Slaughter, who ran through the stop sign at third base, was safe at the plate, and the best-of-seven series went to the Cardinals.Pesky always denied any indecision, and analysis of the film appeared to back him up, but the myth persisted."In my heart, I know I didn't hold the ball," Pesky once said.Born John Michael Paveskovich in Portland, Ore., Pesky first signed with the Red Sox organization in 1939 at the urging of his mother. A Red Sox scout had wooed her with flowers and his father with fine bourbon. His parents, immigrants from what is now Croatia, didn't understand baseball, but they did understand that the Red Sox were the best fit for their son even though other teams offered more money.He played two years in the Red Sox minor league system before making his major league debut in 1942.That season he set the team record for hits by a rookie with 205, a mark that stood until 1997 when fellow Red Sox shortstop Nomar Garciaparra, with whom he became very close, had 209. He also hit .331 his rookie year, second in the American League only to Williams, who hit .356.Pesky spent the next three years in the Navy during World War II, although he did not see combat. He was back with the Red Sox through 1952, playing with the likes of Williams, Bobby Doerr and Dom DiMaggio, before being traded to the Detroit Tigers. (In 2003, author David Halberstam told the story of Pesky, Williams, Doerr and DiMaggio in his book "The Teammates: A Portrait of a Friendship.")Pesky spent two years with the Tigers and Washington Senators before starting a coaching career that included a two-year stint as Red Sox manager in 1963 and 1964. He came back to the Red Sox in 1969 and stayed there, even filling in as interim manager in 1980 after the club fired Don Zimmer.

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    Mike North video: Will Rory McIlroy catch Tiger Woods

    Mike North believes Rory Mcllroy will catch Tiger Woods before Tiger catches Jack Nicklaus. A dominant performance by Rory with his second major win seems to have set the tone for the future.

Business

  •  
    Venus vs Marz. Spa co-owner Ranee McGowan

    Former Chicago Bear, wife start luxury spa in Vernon Hills

    Kukec's People features Ranee McGowan and husband Brandon McGowan, a former Chicago Bear safety, who have opened a luxury spa and lounge in Vernon Hills. And Brandon started a trucking company as well. They prove that there's life after the NFL.

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    Study: Employee salaries increase marginally in 2012

    Salaries for U.S. workers continue to rise incrementally as concerns remain about the stability of the global economy. Aon Hewitt's survey of more than 1,300 U.S. companies found base pay increases for salaried exempt workers were 2.8 percent in 2012, up marginally from 2.7 percent in 2011. "It is unlikely that salary increases will reach pre-recession levels of 4.0 percent or higher any time soon," said Ken Abosch, compensation marketing, strategy and development leader at Aon Hewitt.

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    Mariano’s Fresh Market is expected to open a new location in Hoffman Estates near Barrington and Golf roads on Tuesday, Aug. 28, a company spokeswoman said Monday.

    Hoffman Estates Mariano’s slated to open Aug. 28

    A new Mariano's Fresh Market is scheduled to open in Hoffman Estates in two weeks, a company spokeswoman said Monday. Vivian King, director of public affairs for Roundy's Supermarkets, Inc., which owns Mariano's, said in an email that the store will open at 6 a.m. Tuesday, Aug. 28.

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    Judge gives early OK to $40 million Skechers settlement

    A federal judge on Monday tentatively approved a $40 million settlement between Skechers USA Inc. and consumers who bought the toning shoes after ads made unfounded claims that the footwear would help people lose weight and strengthen muscles. An undetermined number of people will be able to get a maximum repayment for their purchases — up to $80 per pair of Shape-Ups; $84 per pair of Resistance Runner shoes; up to $54 per pair of Podded Sole Shoes; and $40 per pair for Tone-Ups.

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    Stocks fall as economic malaise spreads to Japan

    U.S. stocks fell Monday as evidence piled up that the global economic slowdown is dragging on Asia. The losses broke the longest winning streak for the Standard & Poor's 500 index since December 2010. The index had risen for six straight days. Japan's economy grew in the second quarter at a 1.4 percent annual rate, slower than many analysts had expected. Last week, China released dismal figures on retail sales and exports in July. Traders had hoped Beijing would roll out stimulus measures over the weekend. That did not happen.

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    Fox Lake to offer sales tax incentives to Thorntons

    Fox Lake officials said they will decide Tuesday whether to offer sales tax incentives to developers building a Thorntons gas station at Route 12 and Grand Avenue. Mayor Ed Bender said the proposed incentives would be used to offset the cost of streetscape improvements developers would have to make at the proposed site.

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    United Airlines is moving its corporate headquarters into the nation’s tallest building.

    United Airlines moving HQ to Willis Tower

    United Airlines is moving its corporate headquarters into the nation's tallest building. Willis Tower is already home to United's Network Operations Center. Once the airline's corporate headquarters moves across Chicago's Loop into Willis, officials say United will occupy approximately 25 percent of the 110-story building.

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    Google to acquire Frommer’s travel guides

    Google is buying the Frommer's brand of travel guides. Google Inc., which bought the Zagat restaurant review service in September, plans to use Frommer's guides to hotels and destinations around the world to complement the Zagat listings.

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    EA wants its games on Windows phones

    Electronic Arts Inc., the second-largest U.S. video-game maker, is in talks with Microsoft Corp. to bring mobile games to the next version of Windows as it sees the operating system as central to its handset strategy. "We're working very closely with Microsoft to understand what their views on gaming navigation are," Chief Operating Officer Peter Moore said in a phone interview before the annual Gamescom conference kicks off this week in Cologne, Germany. "Anything that allows more platforms to be adopted quickly that have a gaming element is good for Electronic Arts."

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    MundoFox network launched on 50 stations

    News Corp. has launched its new Spanish-language TV network on 50 stations, marking a challenge to leaders Univision and Telemundo in the fight for Hispanic audiences in the U.S. The MundoFox network launched Monday on stations such as KWHY-TV in Los Angeles and WPXO-LD in New York, covering some 11 million Hispanic households.

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    Merkel ally: Greece should reform, or leave eurozone

    A lawmaker from German Chancellor Angela Merkel's party suggested Monday that Greece should voluntarily leave the eurozone if it fails to implement the economic reforms demanded by its creditors. Michael Fuchs, a senior member of Merkel's Christian Democrats, told daily Handelsblatt that he would prefer if Greece stays in the euro, and noted that Berlin can't force Athens out of the 17-nation currency bloc.

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    FedEx will offer buyouts to U.S. employees in an effort to cut costs as the economy remains tepid.

    Fedex to offer U.S. staff buyouts in cost cut effort

    FedEx will offer buyouts to U.S. employees in an effort to cut costs as the economy remains tepid. The world's second largest package delivery company said Monday it will target employees in its Express and Services units. Express is its speedy shipping service which has been hit as people shift to slower methods to save money. Services is FedEx's behind-the-scenes logistics division.

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    Associated Press Sears Holdings Corp. has filed paperwork to spin off its smaller Hometown and Outlet stores as well as some hardware stores into a separate publicly traded company.

    Sears spinning off some stores into separate co.

    Sears Holdings Corp. has filed paperwork to spin off its smaller Hometown and Outlet stores as well as some hardware stores into a separate publicly traded company.Sears, which runs also runs Kmart, had announced the separation plans in February.

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    Z Trim adds paper industry executive to advisory board

    Z Trim Holdings Inc. has named Roger Stone, CEO of KapStone Paper and Packaging Corp, to the biotechnology company's advisory board.

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    Atkore 3Q net sales increase $11 million

    Global manufacturer Atkore International Holdings Inc., reported net sales for the third fiscal increased $11 million primarily due to increased demand of its products.

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    Study: Employee salaries increase marginally in 2012

    Salaries for U.S. workers continue to rise incrementally as concerns remain about the stability of the global economy. However, workers have the potential to offset low base pay increases through performance-based awards, according to a new survey by Aon Hewitt, the global human resources solutions business of Aon plc.

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    Traders work on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange, Friday, Aug. 10, 2012, in New York. (AP Photo/Jin Lee)

    Futures flat after more signs of slowing in Asia

    Stock futures are relatively flat this morning with a report from Japan showing slower-than-expected economic growth. There were also hopes that China would roll out stimulus measures over the weekend after Beijing released terrible industrial and retail numbers Friday. That did not happen.

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    Postbank workers protest against government privatization plans outside bank’s headquarters during a 24-hour strike in Athens.

    Greek economy contracts 6.2 pct in Q2 over year

    The Greek statistical authority says the country's deep recession has eased slightly, although the economy still contracted 6.2 percent in the second quarter from the same period last year. In the first quarter, the contraction was 6.5 percent. No quarterly figures were provided in the figures published Monday.

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    A woman walks past a screen showing the China Composite Stock Price Index at a brokerage house in Shenyang in northeast China’s Liaoning province Monday.

    Markets brush off Japan growth slowdown

    A larger-than-anticipated slowdown in Japan's growth rate failed to dent investor hopes Monday of more stimulus measures from the world's central banks.Japan's economy grew by only 0.3 percent in the second quarter from the previous three-month period, half the rate that was expected. It was also sharply lower from the first quarter's upwardly revised rate of 1.3 percent and reflected the fallout from Europe's debt crisis and the sharp rise in the value of the yen, which makes it more difficult for the country's export sector to compete in the international marketplace.

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    Oil prices rose slightly Monday in Asia, clawing back losses triggered by the International Energy Agency’s lower crude demand forecast as investors awaited U.S. retail sales figures.

    Oil above $93 ahead of U.S. retail sales figures

    Oil prices rose slightly Monday in Asia, clawing back losses triggered by the International Energy Agency's lower crude demand forecast as investors awaited U.S. retail sales figures.

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    Pfizer Inc. plans an initial public offering of about $100 million in shares of its animal health business to pay off debt.

    Pfizer files IPO plan for animal health business

    Pfizer Inc. plans an initial public offering of about $100 million in shares of its animal health business to pay off debt. The long-anticipated offering by the world's largest drugmaker will represent up to a 20 percent ownership stake in the animal health business, which it named Zoetis. Regulatory filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission do not detail the size of the offering or the anticipated share price.

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    Robert Swartz

    Tax planning business continues to grow in Lake County
    A Libertyville business owner has a a passion for helping corporations and individuals achieve their goals and save money. He says about 80 percent of Americans pay more than they should and we're talking big overpayments, like $10,000 for businesses and $2,000 to $5,000 for individuals.

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    Adapting advice makes Wheeling firm ‘better off’

    The president of Wheeling-based Simmons Engineering Corp. talks to Small Business Columnist Jim Kendall about how he utilized one of his columns to grow his business.

Life & Entertainment

  •  
    Lunchboxes have come a long way from the tin, comic book hero days. PlanetBox Launch works for larger meals, along with Carry Bags.

    Lunch gear goes stainless, makes food safety easy

    This is a different era from the days when I proudly toted cheese and mustard sandwiches on whole wheat in my metal "Empire Strikes Back" lunch box. For generations, lunch boxes had been just that — boxes that food got shoved into. Today, parents have choices. Lots of choices. Lunch box styles vary from utilitarian soft-sided cooler bags to epicurean bento boxes or even more worldly tiffin canisters.

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    “Sparkle”

    ‘Sparkle’ soundtrack: All that glitters isn’t gold

    The burden for greatness is shared among the main cast of "Sparkle," which includes Whitney Houston, Jordin Sparks, Carmen Ejogo, Tika Sumpter and Cee Lo Green. Sparks emerges as the leading lady of the album. She shines bright on various collaborations and her three solo tracks.

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    1966 Chevrolet II Nova

    Chevy II Nova becomes six-year father/son project

    The idea for Gerry and Tyler Dziedzina's radical 1966 Chevy II Nova street machine came suddenly to them, at of all places, the family dinner table. "When my son Tyler was in the seventh grade, he simply blurted out 'Dad, let's build a Nova.' Before I could ask how or why he knew of Novas, my wife said she thought it would be a great idea for a father/son project,” Gerry recalled.

  •  
    Robert Pattinson is set to appear Monday night on “The Daily Show With Jon Stewart.” It’s a gentle re-entry into the media machine leading up to Friday’s opening of his new movie “Cosmopolis.”

    Pattinson returns to spotlight on ‘Daily Show’

    Robert Pattinson has decided to come back — to the spotlight, that is. The 26-year-old actor has been out of sight since learning last month that his girlfriend and "Twilight" co-star Kristen Stewart had an affair with a married movie director. But Pattinson can't lay low forever — he has a film to promote — so he's set to appear Monday night on "The Daily Show" with Jon Stewart.

  •  
    Jennifer Beals, right, as Maj. Jo Stone in “Lauren,” confronts co-star Troian Bellisario who plays a female soldier who reports being raped. The three-part Web series gives a close-up look at the challenges and obstacles women service members face in trying to find justice after being raped.

    YouTube’s ‘Lauren’ series focuses on military sexual assault

    The enormous obstacles and emotional torment that a female soldier confronts in reporting a sexual assault in the military are the focus of the three-part Web series "Lauren" debuting Monday on YouTube's new channel WIGS, which focuses on drama for women. Featuring "Flashdance" star Jennifer Beals and Troian Bellisario, "Lauren" gives a close-up look at the challenges women service members face in trying to find justice after being raped.

  •  

    Changes on the way for ‘The Voice’

    NBC's "The Voice" is adding a bit of thievery to its format. Executive producer Mark Burnett said Sunday that the singing contest will let coaches "steal" contestants from each other during the show's "battle rounds."

  •  
    Kelsey Grammer stars in “Boss,” which returns for its second season Friday on Starz.

    Kelsey Grammer returns as colorful Chicago mayor in ‘Boss’

    On Friday, Aug. 17, under the sign of Leo the lion, the king of beasts, Starz launches Season 2 of its original drama "`Boss," starring Kelsey Grammer as Chicago Mayor Tom Kane, who is battling a degenerative neurological disorder. "Our backdrop is politics, certainly," Grammer says. "But it's a human story about a king who has to lose his kingdom, how he deals with that, how he deals with his sudden humanity, is really what the story is. It's about human behavior rather than about political upheaval or change."

  •  
    Juicer or blender? Either way, a glass of fruits and vegetables is a good way to start the day — and use up what you’ve got in the refrigerator.

    Drinking fruits, vegetables has its benefits

    Julian Thomson is juiced. He moves fast and talks faster. That's what kale — along with spinach, carrots and apples — can do for you. This morning, the same as just about every other day, the Washington videotape editor churned those foods in a five-speed Breville Elite Juicer, dumped them into a glass and chugged it all down in no more than three gulps. "I feel great, man. Really great. My head, my skin, my energy. It's all because of the juice," he says in rapid sound bites.

  •  

    Kitchen Sink
    HealtKitchen Sink

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    Health Madness
    Health Madness

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    Tutti-Frutti
    Tutti-Frutti

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    Morning
    Morning

  •  
    New research has found that lifting weights 30 minutes a day may help to reduce a man’s chance of developing Type 2 diabetes.

    Weight training may help lower diabetes risk in men

    Weight training alone or with aerobic exercise may lower diabetes risk in men, Harvard University research showed, while a German study found that physical activity keeps those with the disease alive longer. Lifting weights 30 minutes a day, five times a week, may reduce a man's chance of developing Type 2 diabetes by as much as 34 percent, according to the Harvard research.

  •  

    Alternatives exist in testing for heart disease

    I have recently developed chest pain when I exercise. My doctor wants me to have a nuclear stress test to check my arteries for blockages. I would like to limit my exposure to radiation. Are there other tests that could be done instead?

  •  

    Try to limit your exposure to chemicals in environment

    Chemicals in our environment are continuing to have an increasing influence on our health — especially a group of commonly used chemicals classified as endocrine disruptors. It has been proposed that these chemicals have a profound effect on many common illnesses including obesity, Type 2 diabetes and metabolic syndrome.

  •  
    Greek yogurt with blueberries is a good choice for an afternoon snack. It’s packed with protein, antioxidents and probiotics to keep your body healthy.

    Your health: Get healthy with your snacks
    Avoid cakes and cookies when experiencing that afternoon slump and instead reach for healthy snacks like pumpkin seeds, fruit, almonds and yogurt.

  •  
    Drinking too much iced tea may increase your risk of developing kidney stones.

    Cool it with the iced tea, fans when it's hot

    People often gulp down iced tea this time of year to help beat the heat. But researchers at Loyola University of Chicago point out too much of the brew can boost the odds of kidney stones, a urinary tract disorder that affects about 10 percent of Americans at some point.

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    Dr. Sarah de Ferranti, director of preventive cardiology at Boston Children’s Hospital, left, meets with patient Quinn Voccio, 14, of Newton, Mass., to go over a proper diet.

    Kids’ cholesterol rate falls, despite obesity rate

    Finally some good news about cholesterol and kids: A big government study shows that in the past decade, the proportion of children who have high cholesterol has fallen. The results are surprising, given that the childhood obesity rate didn't budge.

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    Politics obscures circumcision’s role in fighting AIDS

    Circumcision is in the spotlight again after a German court ruling has pit those who support it for religious and health reasons against those who say boys should have the right to decide for themselves. Lost in the debate is a growing body of recent data that shows circumcision is helping prevent the spread of AIDS in Africa.

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    Nordic walking involves using poles, which exercises the arms and adds to the workout.

    Souped-up walking steps up exercise benefits

    Some people like walking but want to take it, well, a step further. Enter a couple of souped-up styles of perambulation: Nordic walking, which involves using specially designed poles; and race walking, which is walking really fast without breaking into a run.

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    Some children grow out of shyness with some help from adults who ease them into new situations. Others, whose lives are more severely affected, may need professional help to settle anxieities.

    Is your child shy? Here’s how you can help

    Parents with shy children might be concerned about how to determine if their child's shyness is a serious problem or not. Family life educator Janice McCoy and two licensed clinical psychologists identified warning signs to watch for, and ways parents can help their shy children adapt to social settings.

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    Tips to help, signs to look for

    Signs that you may need to seek professional help for you child's shyness, and ways to help your shy child.

Discuss

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    Photo courtesy of John Howard Association of Illinois ¬ Bunk beds that were deemed dangerous because of the numerous locations to tie off at the Illinois Youth Center in St. Charles.

    Editorial: St. Charles prison must be safe for all teens

    A Daily Herald editorial expresses concern that it took nearly three years for new safety beds to be purchased and installed at the Illinois Youth Center in St. Charles after a 16-year-old boy used a bed to kill himself.

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    When ‘boring’ is good

    Columnist Kathleen Parker: Is Ryan too boring and too white? Only if you're a superficial moron, which apparently is how many political strategists and commentators view most Americans.

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    Looking to the time of no ‘women’s day’

    But I don't know whether to laugh or cry when I see all these stories about the president addressing "women's issues" in order to get the "women's vote." Does it mean that every other day he is addressing "men's issues"?

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    It’s a question of context

    Columnist George Will: President Obama's supporters suggest that among presidents, he ranks as the most learned since John Quincy Adams and the most rhetorically gifted politician since Pericles. Yet, remarkably, he is frequently misunderstood. How can this be?

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    The Grand Old Party’s breaking up

    Columnist Froma Harrop: The Tea Party movement has become the dead bad-luck bird hanging around the GOP establishment's neck. Its anger-fueled energy has forced moderate Republicans off ballots in places where moderates tend to win.

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    Wire story all wrong on Social Security
    A letter to the editor: The Associated Press story your paper ran this week completely ignores the retirement reality (AP: Social Security not deal it once was for workers).

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