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Daily Archive : Thursday September 29, 2011

News

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    Leonard Nimoy, who famously portrayed Spock in the original TV series “Star Trek” and numerous film spinoffs, is set to appear in Rosemont as part of Creation Entertainment's “Official Star Trek Convention.”

    ‘Star Trek' fans flocking to Rosemont

    "Star Trek" star Leonard Nimoy is just one of many actors from the beloved sci-fi series of TV shows and film spinoffs who is making an appearance at Creation Entertainment's "Official Star Trek Convention" at the Westin O'Hare Hotel in Rosemont. The Saturday and Sunday dates are sold out, but some tickets are available at the door on Friday, Sept. 30.

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    After about 10 months on the market, the Armour estate in Lake Forest sold for $7.2 million. Meatpacking magnate A. Watson Armour III and his wife, Sarah Wood Armour, bought the property from its original owner in the early 1980s.

    Armour estate in Lake Forest sells for $7.2 million

    A Lake Forest estate that was the home of meatpacking magnate A. Watson Armour III and his wife has sold for $7.2 million. Real-estate agent Eleanor Dowling of Koenig & Strey Real Living declined to identify the buyers of the property abutting Lake Michigan on Lake Forest's southeast side. She said the 7,800-square-foot house and an adjoining, 2.5-acre vacant lot were on the market about 10...

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    Elk Grove Village Mayor Craig Johnson gives the “State of the Village” address earlier this year to the business community.

    Elk Grove Mayor Johnson ponders 8th District bid

    Elk Grove Village Mayor Craig Johnson is pondering a Republican bid for the 8th Congressional District in the March primary at the urging of “prominent political and business figures,” he said Thursday.“A lot of people have been very impressed with how we've run the village through these financial times,” Johnson said.

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    Construction to add a westbound ramp to the Jane Addams Tollway from Route 47 will begin in the spring.

    Full I-90 interchange at Route 47 eyed as economic boon

    Illinois tollway and local leaders hope an economic boom will result from an improved interchange at the Jane Addams Tollway (I-90) and Route 47 in Huntley. Work will start this spring on the nearly $70 million project, which will allow tollway access to and from the west. Huntley Village Manager David Johnson said the interchange would spur business and retail growth in an area of more than...

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    Republican Mark Kirk is part of a delegation of U.S. senators visiting Libya.

    Kirk visits Libya with fellow senators

    Republican U.S. Sen. Mark Kirk visited Libya with some of his colleagues to take stock of the situation in the capital city of Tripoli. He says the era of Moammar Gadhafi has ended with graffiti throughout the city that is anti-Gadhafi.

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    South Africa, Vietnam agree to cooperate to stem rhino poaching

    South Africa and Vietnam agreed to cooperate on wildlife trade, information sharing and prosecution and law enforcement procedures to stem rhino poaching, said Fundisile Mketeni, the deputy director general of bio-diversity and conservation for South Africa.

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    ‘Tiger-style' death sets back S. African conservation program

    A rare South China tiger has been killed by another of the cats that had been trained to survive in the wild at a South African reserve set up to try and save the subspecies, setting back a decade-long conservation program.

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    Websites mine ‘clumsy' U.S. health data to rate medical products

    Two companies aim to do for the health-care industry what Morningstar Inc. does for stocks and Carfax Inc. for vehicles: provide consumers with ratings for drugs and medical devices.

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    Shanghai subway crash caused by power shortage

    Shanghai’s subway collision was caused by a power shortage which disrupted signal operations, according to a statement on the website of Shanghai Shentong Metro Co. Metro workers failed to follow appropriate rules resulting in the accident, it said.

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    Sarkozy government pledges to leave 2012 spending unchanged

    French President Nicolas Sarkozy's government presented a 2012 budget that keeps spending unchanged from this year, with higher debt and pension charges continuing to weigh on its deficit.

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    Palestinians in Israeli jails start hunger strike, official says

    More than 6,000 Palestinian prisoners in Israeli jails started a hunger strike and campaign of disobedience today to protest against their treatment, a Palestinian official said.

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    Illinois officials work to prevent rabies worldwide

    SPRINGFIELD — Illinois public health officials are reminding the public that Wednesday is World Rabies Day. They are working with the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to spread the word about how to stop the deadly disease.The best ways are steering clear of wild animals such as bats and vaccinating pets against rabies.

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    Hijacker fugitive captured

    ALMOCAGEME, Portgual — A 1970s militant who carried out one of the most brazen hijackings in U.S. history lived for decades in an idyllic Portuguese hamlet near a stunning beach with his Portuguese wife and two children, his neighbors said Wednesday.

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    Health care law definition of “affordable” vague

    BLOOMINGTON -- Researchers at Indiana and Cornell universities say that how the federal government defines “affordable” could leave millions of dependents of low and moderate income workers without reasonably priced insurance under the federal health care overhaul.

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    Aquino Says Japan Visit May Yield $1.4 Billion in Investment

    Philippine President Benigno Aquino expects $1.4 billion in investment in energy, mining, manufacturing and services after concluding his visit to Japan today. He spoke at the Manila airport.To contact the reporter on this story: Joel Guinto at jguinto1bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Clarissa Batino at cbatinobloomberg.net

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    A man robbed TCF Bank, 1415 W. Algonquin Road in Rolling Meadows, just after 4 p.m. Thursday.

    Robber hits Rolling Meadows bank

    Rolling Meadows police and the FBI are investigating a bank robbery that occurred near the intersection of Algonquin and Golf roads Thursday afternoon. A man in his mid 50s entered the TCF Bank, 1415 W. Algonquin Road in Rolling Meadows, just after 4 p.m. Thursday and left in a vehicle with an undisclosed amount of money, authorities said.

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    911 tapes released in Prospect Heights murder-suicide

    Three 911 recordings released Thursday provide a glimpse into the shocking murder-suicide that took place Monday afternoon in a hallway at Lake Run Condominiums in Prospect Heights. One neighbor described hearing Dong Yu's screams before running into the hallway and seeing a man shoot her.

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    Judge grants delay in giving defense new details in 1994 Waukegan murder

    A Lake County judge said Thursday that prosecutors do not yet have to tell James Edwards' attorney all they have learned about another man whose blood was found at the scene of a 1994 murder Edwards was convicted of. But Circuit Judge John Phillips said “it will be pretty tough” to convince him to allow investigators to keep the information secret past the Dec. 1 date he set for the...

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    Scott Huber

    Verdict in Naperville squatter case next month

    A DuPage County judge will decide next month whether Naperville squatter Scott Huber is guilty of disorderly conduct and trespassing stemming from a confrontation with a local psychologist.

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    Lakes, Antioch high schools to be featured on NBC 5 morning telecast

    Lakes High School in Antioch will be the epicenter of rocking Friday when they host Dance Party Friday on the early newscast of NBC News. Students and faculty members are expected to arrive at 5:45 a.m. to appear on television and celebrate their homecoming against Antioch this weekend.

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    Seyller vs. Kane County suit could cost taxpayers $520,000

    Taxpayers are on the hook for another $63,000 in attorney fees in the Deb Seyller vs. the Kane County board lawsuit, according to court records. This brings the total in the suit to more than $520,000. Seyller, the circuit court clerk, sued after the board rejected her request for $560,000 in additional funding for personnel. A judge will review the bills on Oct. 19.

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    Lora Hunt, 48, Morris, has turned herself in to Lake County officials on reckless homicide charges.

    Judge denies shorter sentence in fatal nail-polish accident case

    A woman convicted of killing a motorcyclist while painting her fingernails as she drove lost a bid Thursday to have the last four months of her jail sentenced dropped. In July of last year, Lora Hunt, 50, was ordered to spend 18 months behind bars when she is not working or traveling to and from her job in Morris, Ill.

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    Tollway says employees pocketed $25,000

    A dozen Illinois tollway employees are accused of taking $25,000 in tollway funds, with four of them allegedly pocketing drivers’ money while recording them as toll-free fire and police vehicles.

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    Jury selection is scheduled to begin Monday for William Cellini, 76, who is charged with conspiring to shake down a Hollywood producer for a $1.5 million contribution to then Gov. Rod Blagojevich’s campaign.

    No immediate ruling in Cellini case

    The judge in the Cellini trial didn’t immediately decide if he’ll let the defense tell jurors about the admitted drug abuse of a star prosecution witness.

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    Crash in Rosemont injures Chicago man

    A 31-year-old Chicago man remains in serious condition after his Ford Explorer became trapped beneath a semitrailer that apparently made an improper turn in Rosemont Thursday morning. The 32-year-old truck driver from Riverdale was uninjured but was charged with failure to yield turning left.

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    Esteban Figueroa

    South Elgin man accused of misconduct as state worker

    A South Elgin resident and Illinois Department of Human Services case worker felony misconduct charges that he propositoned to clients for sex in exchange or having their public aid benefits renewed. Esteban Figueroa, 44, was being held on $70,000 bail pending trial.

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    Businesses sue Des Plaines over flood damage

    Several businesses in the O’Hare Lake Office Plaza off Devon Avenue have filed a lawsuit against the city of Des Plaines for damages sustained to their property from flooding during a rainstorm July 23.

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    Naperville council to consider alternative smart meters

    The Naperville City Council is expected to consider possible alternatives for so-called "smart meters" for residents who have expressed concerns about privacy and safety issues. The meters are designed to help residents and the city conserve energy and ultimately save money.

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    Evacuated students at St. Charles North High School load buses or wait for their parents to pick them up after the school was shut down following a “security breach” early Thursday afternoon. Students were not allowed to take their backpacks or coats, only their cellphones or other personal items.

    St. Charles North evacuated following threat

    A security threat at St. Charles North High School led to early dismissal of the students. Police said a single bullet was found by a staff member. Classes are scheduled to resume Friday morning.

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    Eric Gilford

    Prosecutors want 140-year sentence in Villa Park murder

    Sixteen times. Eric Gilford was so enraged when his pregnant wife left him, he stabbed her 16 times, killing her and their unborn son, DuPage County prosecutors said Thursday in seeking 140 years in prison for the former U.S. Navy recruiter. “It's just unfathomable how cruel that is, how vicious it is,” Assistant State's Attorney David Bayer said at Gilford's sentencing hearing.

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    One injured in Naperville motorcycle accident

    A female motorcyclist remained hospitalized in serious condition Thursday after striking a car that pulled out in front of her along Ogden Avenue in Naperville, authorities said.

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    Jonathan Wood

    Elk Grove Village man charged in mom’s murder opts against insanity defense

    Nearly three years after authorities charged him with murder, Jonathan Wood’s day in court approaches. Charged in the October 2008 slaying of his mother Marilyn Wood at her Elk Grove Village home, Wood indicated through his lawyer that he does not intend to pursue an insanity defense and that he wants a judge to decide his fate.

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    Deer Park reaching out to others for police service

    Even as Deer Park ponders continuing its contract for police service from Kildeer, the former village is looking to other agencies for potential future service while the latter is mulling the possible reduction of its own department that move would entail. Officials from Palatine, Lake Zurich and Barrington have confirmed receiving inquiries from Deer Park about the possibility of providing...

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    Groundbreaking next week for West Chicago middle school expansion

    West Chicago District 33 is ready to break ground for the expansion of its middle school. The work is expected to push the start of school back by two weeks next year.

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    Players from the West Chicago Wildcat Youth Football Organization are wearing pink socks for Breast Cancer Awareness Month.

    West Chicago youth football teams wearing pink for cancer awareness

    Real youth football players wear pink. Donna Schoenenberger, homecoming coordinator for West Chicago Wildcats Youth Football, dyed 350 pairs of socks, which will be worn by players and coaches this weekend to raise awareness for breast cancer.

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    Police reports

    Between 70 and 80 feet of copper pipes was stolen sometime between Sept. 14 and Tuesday from a vacant house in the 400 block of Jay Street, according to police reports. The deadbolt lock on the front door had been pried off to gain entry.

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    Barrington students help restore Joplin H.S.

    A new student organization has been created at Barrington High School to help struggling high schools across the country — beginning with tornado-ravaged Joplin High School in Missouri. “Go Beyond Barrington” was the brainchild of sophomore Jake Herb, borne from an idea presented to Boy Scout Troop 21 last spring.

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    Debate continues over a proposed 20-year master plan for Lake County's 172-acre government campus in Libertyville, required as part of the approval for the Central Permit Facility.

    Master plan for government campus in Libertyville questioned

    An already lengthy debate regarding the future of Lake County's government campus in Libertyville will continue as village officials await more information about what can be built there before making a decision. Besides directing staff to prepare a clearer version of what is being presented, village officials want a legal opinion of what could happen if the county withdraws its proposed master...

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    Drug court program coming to McHenry County

    A new adult drug court program for high-risk, high-need offenders debuts Dec. 1 in McHenry County’s 22nd Judicial Circuit, officials said. The voluntary program is funded by a $305,000 grant from the Bureau of Justice.

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    Suzi Schmidt

    Radogno: Schmidt revelations “extremely troubling”

    The state Senate’s top Republican on Thursday called the 911 recordings stemming from state Sen. Suzi Schmidt’s domestic problems “extremely troubling.” Senate GOP leader Christine Radogno also said she has been speaking with Schmidt as the freshman senator from Lake Villa Township “makes important decisions regarding her personal and professional life.”

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    Palatine woman gets probation, jail time for credit card theft

    A Palatine woman was sentenced to 30 months probation and 30 days in Cook County Jail in exchange for her guilty plea to charges she falsified information on a charge slip. Latonya Floyd, 37, admitted using a credit card that did not belong to her to purchase items totalling more than $2,000 at a Palatine children's store and a Palatine office supply store.

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    Roger Prosise is retiring as superintendent of Diamond Lake School District 76.

    District 76 to search to replace retiring Prosise as superintendent

    Officials in Diamond Lake Elementary District 76 plan to hire a search firm to find a replacement for longtime Superintendent Roger Prosise, who is retiring at the end of the school year. The process is in the early stage but the board has agreed to invite search firms to discuss their services with the intent of hiring one, possibly by the end of the year.

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    Round Lake man pleads not guilty in arson case

    A Round Lake man pleaded not guilty Thursday to charges he started a car on fire in an act of revenge. Ceceillo Froylan, 33, faces up to seven years in prison if convicted of arson. Assistant State’s Attorney Patricia Fix said Froylan, of the 300 block of Bernice Court, was involved in a fight in a bar in early August.

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    Elgin looks to buy Chicago Street Metra station plan

    Elgin City Council members gave preliminary approval to spend $20,000 to develop a plan for the area surrounding the Chicago Street Metra Station. The plan itself will cost $100,000 to create, but the Regional Transportation Authority is covering the majority of the cost.

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    Preckwinkle aims to recoup delinquent Cook County taxes

    Delinquent on your Cook County business taxes? Here's your chance to come clean without penalties. A new program launched Thursdaywill allow businesses to pay certain delinquent taxes and interest back for the past four years without penalties, including the alcoholic beverages tax, amusement tax, and sales of new motor vehicles and parking garage Tax. Deadline to register with the Cook County...

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    Mount Prospect man pleads guilty to delivering crack cocaine

    A Mount Prospect man charged with selling crack cocaine to an undercover police officer in July pleaded guilty to the charges. Anthony Garner, 30, pleaded guilty to delivery of a controlled substance and was sentenced to six years in prison.

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    Carol Stream Park District officials will consider a proposal to install a cellphone tower at Armstrong Park.

    Cellphone tower pitched for Carol Stream park

    Carol Stream Park District officials will consider a proposal to install a cellphone tower at Armstrong Park, but any such project may have to wait until after flooding issues are resolved.

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    Ela Road closure in Lake Zurich starts Monday

    A section of Ela Road in Lake Zurich will be closed for two days next week to accommodate replacement of a sanitary sewer main under the pavement.

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    Richard M. Daley speaks at Wheaton College as his mayoral tenure nears its end.

    Daley biography to be published in 2013

    The University of Chicago Press says it will publish “First Son: The Biography of Richard M. Daley” by Chicago writer Keith Koeneman. According to a news release, Koeneman will be given “unprecedented access” to key figures in Daley’s administration.

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    Former Oak Forest Hospital patient Michael Yanul, 58, was moved into a private nursing home on Aug. 31. He died Sept. 20.

    Death raises questions after hospital closure

    A patient who predicted he wouldn’t survive a move from a now-closed Illinois charity hospital has died three weeks after his transfer to a nursing home, family and friends said Thursday. The death of Michael Yanul, 58, who had muscular dystrophy and breathed with a ventilator, raises questions about how Cook County managed patient transfers while closing the hospital in the South suburbs.

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    MHS musicians perform Oct. 5:

    The Mundelein High School instrumental music department will present its sixth annual Fall Collage Concert on Wednesday, Oct. 5.

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    Oktoberfest in Vernon Hills:

    Vernon Hills hosts its 7th annual Oktoberfest from 3 to 10:30 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 1 at the village’s Metra station, 75 Route 45.

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    Bird expert in Libertyville:

    The Lake County Audubon Society kicks will host Shannon Hackett, an associate curator in the department of zoology and head of the Field Museum’s bird division, at 7:30 p.m. Monday, Oct. 3 at the Libertyville village hall, 118 W. Cook Ave.

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    Des Plaines upgrades its speed monitors

    Des Plaines is installing six new speed radar signs to help police respond to chronic traffic problems throughout town.

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    Jack Daniel McCullough

    Prosecutor argues for media subpoenas in 1957 murder case

    A prosecutor has argued in favor of subpoenas for reporters to turn over notes from jailhouse interviews with a suspect in the 1957 murder of a Sycamore girl. Reporters interviewed Jack Daniel McCullough while he was in custody in Seattle — before his extradition to face charges in the murder of 7-year-old Maria Ridulph.

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    Northbrook man accused in ‘erectile pumps’ scheme

    A Northbrook man plans to plead guilty in Rhode Island to charges he shipped unwanted “erectile pumps” to diabetes patients as part of a Medicare fraud scheme, federal prosecutors said Thursday. Gary Winner, 49, is accused of purchasing $26 penis enlargers from an adult website, repackaging them and shipping them to patients with information claiming the devices helped “bladder control, urinary...

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    Illinois seeks vendors for disabilities job fair

    Illinois Department of Human Services officials are seeking vendors and employers for its Career and Job Fair and Disabilities Expo in October. The expo is dedicated to people with disabilities and their caretakers, and offers services, products and equipment to help them live independently.

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    State aims to build public awareness about jobs for disabled

    Billboards could be the latest tools to help the disabled in Illinois find jobs in a tough economy. It’s the latest phase of a public awareness campaign by the Illinois Department of Human Services’ Division of Rehabilitation Services. The statewide campaign starts Oct.1.

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    Wheaton Mayor Mike Gresk

    Wheaton, Naperville mayors bet on volleyball match for a good cause

    Wheaton and Naperville leaders make a bet on a high school volleyball match to raise awareness for the event, a "Volley for the Cure" event that raises money for breast cancer awareness.

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    Ron Keller and his band are returning to Oktoberfest to play traditional German music.

    Prost! Oktoberfest kicks off in Naperville

    Naperville will give a nod to its German heritage this weekend with a few brats washed down with an ice cold Spaten or two. Naper Settlement is sponsoring its annual Oktoberfest from 4 to 10 p.m. Friday and 11 a.m. to 10 p.m. Saturday on the museum grounds at 523 S. Webster St.

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    Police reports

    Marissa A. Farrand, 24, of the 4N600 block of Lake Circle Northwest, was charged Saturday with retail theft, according to a police report. Store security at Meijer, 855 S. Randall Road, observed Farrand take four items from the cosmetics section and put them in her purse. Security then saw Farrand take eight items into a fitting room and exit with only three. From there, security watched her roll...

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    Valerie Jarrett’s father, Dr. James Bowman, died Wednesday after a long battle with cancer

    Father of White House adviser Valerie Jarrett dies

    Dr. James Bowman, an internationally recognized pathologist whose daughter, Valerie Jarrett, is a senior White House adviser, has died. He was 88.

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    Crawling in Huntley's construction zone

    Sometimes, the ongoing construction along Route 47 slows traffic down to a crawl. With that in mind, the Village of Huntley and the Huntley Chamber are inviting you for a construction crawl and open house along Route 47 from 5 to 10 p.m. Oct. 7. Authorities want you to visit as many of the businesses as you can on Route 47 that are affected by the widening project.

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    Dist. 200 gives Hubble developer more time

    Wheaton Warrenville Unit District 200 extends by two months the time given to a developer that bought the old Hubble Middle School to get permitting done. The new deadline for that work is now Nov. 28.

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    Corinne Pierog

    Two more enter 25th state Senate race

    Richard Slocum of Sugar Grove is running for the Republican nomination for the 25th District Illinois Senate seat, and Corinne Pierog of St. Charles wants the Democratic slot. That makes four people interested so far in the post. The current senator, Chris Lauzen of Aurora, is giving it up to run for the Republican nomination for Kane County Board chairman.

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    Wayne Day promotes history, story

    The annual Wayne Day on Saturday will have the standard pig roast, kite flying and bonfire, but also will include items from a traveling exhibit of a foundation that honors Marguerite Henry, a famous author who once lived in Wayne and whose horse, Misty, inspired many generations of female horse riders.

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    Harrison Elementary fifth-graders Olivia Tegge, left, and Holly Friedel, both 10, walk down East Side Drive in Geneva on their way to school on International Walk to School Day last year. This year's event is set for Wednesday, Oct. 5, throughout Kane County.

    Walk to School Day on Wednesday

    The Making Kane Fit for Kids consortium, a partnership between community leaders and the Kane County Department of Health, is sponsoring the second annual International Walk to School Day on Wednesday, Oct. 5. Hundreds of elementary schools across the state are participating, including dozens in the Fox Valley area.

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    Decorating pumpkins is a favorite activity of visitors to Blackberry Farm in Aurora during Pumpkin Weekends in October.

    Pumpkin weekends bring fall fun to Aurora's Blackberry Farm

    Blackberry Farm in Aurora will be at its pioneer peak this fall, decorated and ready for families to enjoy during a series of five Pumpkin Weekends. “Half the fun is seeing the decorations,” said Jeff Long, spokesman for Fox Valley Park District, which owns and manages the farm. The other half of the fun is pumpkins, of course.

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    Forty years of haunting at the Lombard Jaycees' annual haunted house may come to an end if the group doesn't find a new location by Saturday, Oct. 1.

    Lombard Jaycees need house for haunting

    What's a haunted house minus the house? Lombard Jaycees may be forced to answer that question if they can't find a location by Saturday, Oct. 1, to host what would be their 41st annual haunted house. And the haunted house hunt has been challenging so far, they say.

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    Local talent thin during ‘X Factor' Chicago airing

    The Chicago portion of “The X Factor” auditions aired Wednesday night, and while the production team spent several wet days in April and May looking for talent at the Sears Centre in Hoffman Estates, there was precious little to show for it.

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    Oak Brook holds open house on park plan

    Oak Brook Park District will hold an open house to review projects included in its master plan from 8 a.m. to noon and from 3 to 7 p.m. Oct. 3 at the Family Recreation Center, 1450 Forest Gate Road, Oak Brook.

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    Gay Wheaton alumni plan Homecoming event

    A group of Wheaton College alumni who are gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgender and questioning will sponsor their first Homecoming event and bring in a nationally known artist to perform, organizers said.

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    Carol Stream food drive on Saturday

    The Rotary Club of Carol Stream will sponsor its third annual Community-Wide Food Drive from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 1.

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    Aurora opens new riverwalk section

    A new section of riverwalk in front of Waubonsee Community College in downtown Aurora officially opened Tuesday.

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    Rev. Pfleger to speak at DuPage fair housing banquet

    Rev. Michael Pfleger will be the guest speaker when HOPE Fair Housing Center in Wheaton sponsors its 43rd annual banquet at 7 p.m. Oct. 20 at the Hyatt Lisle Hotel, 1400 Corporetum Drive, Lisle.

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    Norge Ski Club in Fox River Grove will be hosting the U.S. Ski Jumping and Nordic Combined Championships on Saturday, while its annual special jumping tournament will take place Sunday. In this 2006 photo, Anders Johnson of the U.S. ski team flies over Norge’s 70-meter hill.

    U.S. ski jumping kicks off in Fox River Grove

    Norge Ski Club will be hosting the U.S. Ski Jumping and Nordic Combined Championships on Saturday, while its annual special jumping tournament will take place Sunday. Official training takes place Friday At least 60 ski jumpers are expected to participate, including about 20 to 24 who will compete in the Nordic combined, which consists of ski jumping and a race on roller skis.

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    Casey's June beetle

    Hundreds of plants, animals up for new protections

    The Obama administration is taking steps to extend new federal protections to a list of imperiled animals and plants that reads like a manifest for Noah's Ark — from the melodic golden-winged warbler and slow-moving gopher tortoise, to the slimy American eel and tiny Texas kangaroo rat.

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    Workers cause Freon leak at Des Plaines city hall

    Des Plaines evacuated its city hall about 11:12 a.m. today due to a Freon leak in the basement, Fire Chief Alan Wax said. The leak has been capped but pockets of the gas remain in the building, he said shortly before noon. Firefighters were ventilating the buildling before letting anyone back inside.

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    Lombard offers free training in lifesaving techniques

    Training on how to perform CPR and how to use an automatic external defibrillator is no longer only for lifeguards and health professionals, say the organizers of a free training program planned for Saturday in Lombard. “I think this training is more accessible to the everyday people who do not need a health care certification CPR class,” said Lt. Paul DiRienzo, emergency medical services officer...

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    Dogs and their owners can watch agility demonstrations and try the tricks themselves at Dog-tober Fest, set for noon to 4 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 1, in Deicke Park, Huntley.

    Huntley Dog-tober Fest brings pets and owners together

    Dogs and their owners having fun together is what Dog-tober Fest is all about. Man's best friend can participate in contests, learn tricks and socialize at the third annual event, set for noon to 4 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 1, at Deicke Park, 12015 Mill St., Huntley. “The fest is to focus on the important relationship between families and their pets while bringing attention to the needs of...

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    Program coordinator Josie Ruiz, 24, of Chicago lends some homework help to Marisol Reyes, 12, and Brittany Aldin, 12, both of Mount Prospect and students at River Trails Middle School. Greater Wheeling Area Youth Outreach’s programs for middle school students received a huge boost recently through a $204,000 United Way grant.

    Wheeling youth agency wins $204,000 United Way grant

    A youth organization operating centers for middle and high school students in Arlington Heights and Wheeling will receive $204,000 toward its cause through United Way of Chicago. The funding will help Greater Wheeling Area Youth Outreach, which currently works with 52 students from low-income families through a mentoring formula that includes after-school homework help followed by games and...

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    U.S. Sen. Dick Durbin, seen here in 2009, stopped in Aurora yesterday to tout President Obama's jobs plan. Durbin said Congress must get people back to work before tackling the budget deficit.

    Dawn Patrol: Quick hits as you head out the door

    Illinois Sen. Dick Durbin was in Aurora yesterday promoting President Obama's jobs plan. A second Carol Stream bank was robbed by who is believed to be the same man. An Antioch man out on bail after child sex abuse charges now is charged with having child porn. The death of a 3-month-old Hoffman Estates girl is under investigation. This and more news from overnight and this morning.

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    Pro-Syrian regime protesters shout slogans in front the EU mission office, in Damascus, Syria. Supporters of President Bashar Assad pelted the U.S. ambassador to Syria with eggs and tomatoes Thursday as he entered an office for a meeting with a leading opposition figure and then tried to storm the building in the capital Damascus, the opposition activist said.

    Angry Syrians trap U.S. envoy in office for hours

    BEIRUT — Supporters of President Bashar Assad stoned the convoy of the U.S. ambassador to Syria as he arrived for a meeting with a leading opposition figure on Thursday, then pelted him with eggs and tomatoes and tried to break into the building while he was inside, the opposition activist and a U.S. official said. The American envoy was trapped in the office for three hours by the angry...

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    U.S. fugitive George Wright is seen in a post office in Praia das Macas, Portugal in 2000. Wright was arrested Sept. 26 by Portuguese authorities at the request of the U.S. government after more than 40 years as a fugitive, authorities said. The FBI says Wright, who escaped the Bayside State Prison in Leesburg, N.J., in 1970, became affiliated with the Black Liberation Army and in 1972 he and his associates hijacked a Delta flight from Detroit to Miami.

    AP Exclusive: U.S. officials knew fugitive in Africa

    LISBON, Portugal — A convicted American killer who once hijacked a plane lived openly under his real name in West Africa during the 1980s and even knew U.S. embassy officials there, a former U.S. ambassador said Thursday.

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    Bahraini sentenced to death for murdering officer at protest

    Bahrain’s National Safety Appeals Court sentenced a man to death for the murder of a policeman during anti-government demonstrations this year and handed down prison sentences to 20 medics, Bahrain News Agency said today.

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    Lambeau Field landlord approves expansion

    GREEN BAY, Wis. — The board that oversees Lambeau Field has approved the team’s expansion plans at the Green Bay Packers’ stadium.

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    Wisconsin court upholds conviction in torture case

    MADISON, Wis. — A state appeals court says a woman accused of helping her gang of identity thieves kill a woman and torturing the woman’s son was properly convicted.

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    Downstate man to be sentenced in baseball bat killing

    EDWARDSVILLE, Ill. — A man who claimed he pummeled a southwestern Illinois woman with a baseball bat in self-defense is slated to hear his punishment in her beating death.Fifty-four-year-old Scott Moore is scheduled to be sentenced Thursday in Madison County, where jurors convicted him in July of first-degree murder and armed robbery.

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    Teen gets 45-year prison sentence for murder

    DECATUR, Ill. — A judge in central Illinois has sentenced a 16-year-old boy to 45 years in prison for his role in the stomping death of a 61-year-old man and 20 additional years for attempted murder.Associate Macon County Circuit Judge Timothy Steadman cited the “extreme brutality” of the crimes in sentencing Deonta Johnson on Wednesday.

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    Man gets more prison time for southern Illinois escape

    BENTON, Ill. — A man who escaped with two other inmates from a federal prison camp in southern Illinois is going to be spending some more time behind bars for it.A federal judge in Benton sentenced 37-year-old Robert Martin on Wednesday to two years and nine months of additional time in prison in connection with the escape last February.

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    Downstate man gets 12 years for robbing 73-year-old woman

    MARION, Ill. — A southern Illinois man who authorities say hit a 73-year-old woman’s head on the pavement while robbing her has been ordered to spend 12 years in prison.

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    Police looking for leads to more possible shooters in rural Indiana deaths

    INDIANAPOLIS — Police are following up on tips after arresting a person of interest in the killing of five people in rural southeast Indiana, trying to determine if anyone else might have been involved in the shootings.

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    Baby sitters used toddler as decoy in alcohol heist, police say

    SOUTH BEND, Ind. — Northern Indiana police say two baby sitters caring for a 2-year-old boy used him as a “decoy” so they could steal alcohol from a store.

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    24 more claims filed in Indiana stage collapse

    INDIANAPOLIS — Indiana’s attorney general says 24 more tort claims have been filed alerting the state of possible lawsuits in the wake of last month’s deadly State Fair stage collapse.

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    Merkel’s Rescue Fund Victory Sets Stage for Next Crisis Steps

    German lawmakers’ approval of an expansion of the euro-area rescue fund’s firepower handed Chancellor Angela Merkel a victory that paves the way for additional steps to stem the European debt crisis.

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    Smokers Quit With Cheap Remedy Used in Bulgaria for 40 Years

    For as little as $6, there may be a smoking-cessation remedy that actually works.A clinical test of Tabex, sold in eastern Europe for more than four decades, shows that the plant-based medicine can triple smokers’ chances of quitting compared with a dummy pill. The results of a study on 740 people were published today in the New England Journal of Medicine.

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    Nigeria Investigating Suspected Gadhafi Fighters, Police Say

    Nigeria is investigating more than 100 people detained in the northern city of Kaduna on suspicion of being fighters for former Libyan leader Moammar Gadhafi after they entered the country from Niger, police said.

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    China launches module for space station

    BEIJING — China launched an experimental module to lay the groundwork for a future space station on Thursday, underscoring its ambitions to become a major space power.The box car-sized Tiangong-1 module was shot into space from the Jiuquan launch center on the edge of the Gobi Desert aboard a Long March 2FT1 rocket.

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    Hugo Chavez Phones State TV to Dismiss Report of Kidney Failure

    Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez spoke live by phone on state television today dismissing as “rumors” a newspaper report that he had undergone emergency treatment for kidney failure.

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    Scott Huber

    Trespassing trial opens for Naperville squatter

    After being chased into her office by Naperville squatter Scott Huber, psychologist Kathy Borchardt became “very frightened” when she realized there was no way out – other than a pair of second-story windows, she testified Wednesday.

Sports

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    Thursday’s girls volleyball scoreboard
    High school varsity results from Thursday's girls volleyball matches, as reported to the Daily Herald.

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    Thursday’s girls tennis scoreboard
    High school varsity results from Thursday's girls tennis meets, as reported to the Daily Herald.

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    Thursday’s girls swimming scoreboard
    High school varsity results from Thursday's girls swimming meets, as reported to the Daily Herald.

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    Thursday’s girls cross country scoreboard
    High school varsity results from Thursday's girls cross country meets, as reported to the Daily Herald.

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    Thursday’s boys soccer scoreboard
    High school varsity results of Thursday's boys soccer matches, as reported to the Daily Herald.

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    Thursday’s boys golf scoreboard
    High school varsity results from Thursday's boys golf meets, as reported to the Daily Herald.

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    Thursday’s boys cross country scoreboard
    High school varsity results from Thursday's boys cross country meets, as reported to the Daily Herald.

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    Boys soccer/Fox Valley roundup

    Larkin 3, West Chicago 3: Erik Rodriguez, Tony Escamilla and Jesus Avila scored goals for Larkin (10-3-4) in this nonconference tie. Santiago Guerrero had 7 saves in goal for the Royals.South Elgin 9, Noble Street Charter 0: Sean Burnette had 2 goals and seven other players scored for the Storm (6-4-4) in this easy win at the Hampshire tournament. Bryan Irwin, Tyler Piszczek, Michael Kozielek, David Left, Phillip Saccameno, and Owen Bolt also scored for South Elgin and Tyler Shipion had 8 saves in goal.Hampshire 6, Woodstock 3: Ismael Morales and Jason Bishop had 2 goals each to lead FVC Fox-leading Hampshire to another division win. Jose Hernandez and Zack Suthers also scored for the Whip-Purs (7-7, 3-0) and Andy Pederson had 5 saves in goal.Schaumburg 2, Streamwood 0: Jose Resendiz had 9 saves in goal for the Sabres (5-12-1) in this nonconference loss.

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    Scouting Week 6 DuPage County football

    Previews of this weekend's top football games in the DuPage County coverage area

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    Football: Scouting Week 6, Northwest
    Previewing Week 6 of high school football for the Mid-Suburban League, Maine West, St. Viator, Leyden and Christian Liberty.

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    Football: Scouting Week 6, Lake County

    A game-by-game breakdown of Week 6 of the high school football season in Lake County.

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    Scouting Week 6 in Tri-Cities football
    A preview of this weekend's high school football games for the Tri-Cities coverage area

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    Scouting Week 6 Fox Valley football

    A look at Week 5 in Fox Valley area football.

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    Girls volleyball / Lake County roundup

    Klaudia Basierak slammed a career-high 14 kills as well as 4 aces and 2 blocks to lead Grayslake Central’s girls volleyball team past Hampshire 25-8, 22-25, 25-9 in the Rams’ “Think Pink” game Thursday.“The girls were playing for something greater than themselves tonight and they responded with intensity and heart,” Grayslake Central coach Jason Janczak said. “I’m proud of them for playing great for an important cause such as breast cancer awareness.”Gabi Casper added 9 kills and 2 aces, and Meghan Brewster had 21 assists for Grayslake Central (17-8, 5-2 Fox Valley Fox).Wauconda d. Zion-Benton: Erinn Hellweg had 10 kills, and Megan Tallman added 8 as the Bulldogs defeated the Zee-Bees 25-15, 25-21. Tallman also had 9 assists, 3 aces and 6 digs. Rebecca Thiltgen added 3 aces and 7 digs, and Hellweg had 5 digs. Wauconda’s record improves to 13-7.

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    Boys soccer / Lake County roundup

    Maurcio Salgado continued to find the back of the net, and Round Lake’s boys soccer team continued to find the win column Thursday.Salgado scored 3 goals, giving him 21 for the season, leading the Panthers to a 4-2 win over Zion-Benton.Lorenzo Cortez also scored for Round Lake (13-2-2), with Salgado earning his 13th assist. Jordi Rubio assisted on Salgado’s last two goals. Edgar Rodriguez also had an assist for the Panthers.Bryon Montoya scored both goals for Zion-Benton, which led 1-0 at halftime.Grayslake North 3, Woodstock North 2: The Knights won in a shootout for the second time in three days.Carson Klarck, Arnaud Laroche-Bataille, Andreas Thedorf and Kip Wetter (game-winner) converted penalty-kick goals in the shootout for Grayslake North (7-9, 3-1 Fox Valley Fox), while keeper Stevie Streeter made 3 saves.Klarck and Baruk Perez-Vera scored in regulation for the Knights.Woodstock North (3-9, 0-6) received both of its goals from Kenji Koruda.

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    Elgin edges Crystal Lake South

    The way this game began, it seemed like the goals would never end for the Crystal Lake South Gators’ boys soccer team. The Gators (11-7) fell to the Elgin Maroons by a score of 4-3 at Memorial Field at Elgin High School in nonconferencr actio on Thursday evening

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    Providence ends Benet’s streak

    A roundup of Thursday's girls volleyball action around DuPage County.

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    Thirty years after he finished his playing career at Nebraska, Barry Alvarez went to Wisconsin and built the Badgers' program in the image of the Cornhuskers. No one's more excited than Alvarez, now Wisconsin's athletic director, about Nebraska playing its inaugural Big Ten game on the Badgers' field on Saturday.

    Wisconsin, Nebraska built on toughness, winning

    Wisconsin and Nebraska have a lot more in common than red-and-white uniforms and their new Big Ten allegiance.Thirty years after he finished his playing career at Nebraska, Barry Alvarez went to Madison, Wis., and built the football program in the image of the Cornhuskers. No one's more excited than Alvarez about No. 8 Nebraska visiting the seventh-ranked Badgers for its inaugural Big Ten game Saturday night.“My background and what I believe in football were established at the University of Nebraska,” said Alvarez, now Wisconsin's athletic director. “I felt fortunate to play for a great coach in Bob Devaney, and he had a tremendous staff. And as far as fundamentals — physical play, sound play — all those things are things I took with me to this program.”Wisconsin had lost 36 of 45 games before Alvarez began his 16-year run as coach in 1990. Alvarez won 118 games and three Big Ten championships before he turned the program over to Bret Bielema, who is 53-16 in six seasons with a Big Ten co-championship.Wisconsin and Nebraska football is predicated on toughness, something Devaney emphasized immediately upon taking over a downtrodden Huskers program in 1962. Devaney went 9-2 his first season and was 101-20-2 over 11 years with national titles in 1970-71.Alvarez played linebacker for Devaney from 1965-67 and was the leading tackler for the `67 team that led the nation in total defense and forced a school-record 40 turnovers. Alvarez came to Nebraska from Pennsylvania but appreciated Devaney's commitment to bringing in as many homegrown players as possible.The state produced the burly boys who anchored the lines, and Devaney would recruit nationally for speed and skill.At Nebraska, the run set up the pass, though some would say the run just set up more runs during Tom Osborne's 25-year, 255-win coaching career (1973-1997) that ended with national championships three of his last four seasons.If that sounds familiar to Wisconsin fans, it should. Both Nebraska and Wisconsin have traditionally gone into each game intent on outmuscling and wearing down the opponent, though there was a four-year hiatus from that methodology when Bill Callahan brought the finesse of the West Coast offense to Lincoln from 2004-07.Interestingly, Callahan was an assistant under Alvarez at Wisconsin (1990-94). So was Kevin Cosgrove (1990-2003), Callahan's much-maligned defensive coordinator at Nebraska.Fourth-year Nebraska coach Bo Pelini completely cut ties to the Callahan era after last season when he fired Shawn Watson as offensive coordinator and promoted Tim Beck to the job. Beck's system gives a nod to the past, featuring the hard running of Rex Burkhead and a splash of Osborne's favored triple-option with quarterback Taylor Martinez.Osborne goes back to the immigration patterns of the late 19th and early 20th centuries to explain the similar way the two programs were built.“A lot of people in Nebraska and a lot of people in Wisconsin are northern European types who tend to be big people and tend to have potential to be good linemen,” he said. “I think (Alvarez) always felt he could recruit his offensive linemen, some of his defensive linemen, from the state.“If you look at Nebraska over the years, we've had some fine linemen types out of Nebraska. You don't want to stereotype too much. We've had great running backs and receivers and all kinds of people from Nebraska, and they've had some, too.”All five of Wisconsin's starting offensive linemen are from the state, and they are big, averaging 322 pounds a man and none standing shorter than 6 feet 4. Three of the Huskers' five starting offensive linemen — Seung Hoon Choi, Mike Caputo and Spencer Long — went to Nebraska high schools.Alvarez said he “stole” from Nebraska the idea for a walk-on program.

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    Lance Briggs chases down Packers running back Ryan Grant last Sunday at Soldier Field.

    Lance Briggs appears to be improving with age

    Coach Lovie Smith wasn't surprised that six-time Pro Bowl linebacker Lance Briggs had 15 tackles in each of the past two games -- he expects that.

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    Cary-Grove blanks Huntley

    There was a constant drizzle and mist with winds gusty over 50 miles an hour. Generally, it was a lousy night to play soccer. Nobody told that to the senior-laden Cary-Grove Trojans.

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    Blackhawks rookie Ben Smith (28) scores the tying goal in the third period against the Red Wings on Wednesday at the United Center. Smith later suffered a possible concussion when he was hit in the head by the Wings' Brendan Smith.

    Hawks veteran Sean O'Donnell wonders where respect among players has gone

    When it comes to head shots such as the one Ben Smith took, Blackhawks coach Joel Quenneville and defenseman Sean O'Donnell think players will get the message that it can't continue as long as the suspensions stay tough.

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    Prairie Ridge hands Huntley 1st loss

    Prairie Ridge d. Huntley: Sam Boesch had 12 kills and 10 digs but Prairie Ridge neutralized Huntley’s other players as the Wolves handed the Red Raiders their first girls volleyball loss of the season Thursday, winning the Fox Valley Conference Valley Division showdown 25-20, 25-19.Amy Dion had 12 digs for Huntley (14-1, 6-1) and Eli Manning dished out 22 assists.Other area matches: Cary-Grove defeated Crystal Lake South 23-25, 25-17, 25-16 in the FVC Valley as Melanie Jereb had 16 kills and 2 aces. Jess Bartevyszyn added 5 kills and 31 assists for the Trojans (19-1, 6-1) and Nicole Schuh had 20 digs. Nicole Slimko had 8 kills and Katie Meyers added 4 aces an 17 digs for the Gators (10-10, 2-5). ... Kali Cramer had 7 kills and 9 assists and Sydney Doby added 11 kills and 4 aces to lead Harvest Christian to a 25-14, 25-13 win over Christian Liberty. Katelyn Floyd had 12 assists and 4 kills for the Lions. ... Lexie Mason had 10 kills and 12 digs to lead Bartlett (9-13) to a 25-23, 28-26 win over Addison Trail in nonconference play. Amy Hurban added 18 digs for the Hawks and Tori Burke had 10 digs and 22 assists. ... Dana Seager had 5 kills and 3 blocks for Hampshire (4-15, 1-6) in a 25-8, 22-25, 25-9 Fox Valley Fox loss to Grayslake Central. ... Jillian Hostetler had 6 kills and Steph Magnuson, Rebekah Hischke and Alex Shemanske 4 each in Dundee-Crown’s 25-23, 25-18 FVC Valley loss to McHenry. Cori Eischen added 15 assists and Cassie Sommers had 10 digs for the Chargers (4-12, 0-7).

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    St. Viator cooled off in ESCC tourney

    St. Viator was red-hot coming into the East Suburban Catholic Conference boys golf tournament but struggled to fourth place Thursday and finished third in the overall league standings behind Carmel and Benet.

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    Hankwitz wants Wildcats' defense to get more physical

    As much as it hurts to admit, Northwestern knows Illinois manhandled the Wildcats in last year's 48-27 decision at Wrigley Field. That's the No. 1 thing NU must change when the teams meet Saturday in Champaign.

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    Hawks’ backup goalie battle down to the wire

    It could be make or break time for Blackhawks goalie Ray Emery in his quest to be Corey Crawford's backup as he'll play the full game Friday against Pittsburgh.

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    Caleigh Ryan, here diving for a ball against Willowbrook last season, has been central to Glenbard West’s volleyball resurgence.

    Ryan, Glenbard West enjoying volleyball renaissance

    Glenbard West's last regional title for volleyball was 1985. Six years ago the Hilltoppers won just 10 matches. Now they are 20-2 and could win 30 matches for the first time since their 1983 state championship team. There's no bigger reason than junior setter Caleigh Ryan.

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    St. Viator’s Mary Cleary attempts to block a spike during Thursdays game between Fenwick and St. Viator at St. Viator High School. St. Viator won the match in two sets.

    Mueller, St. Viator serve up a victory

    Even though it won the first set against visiting Fenwick, St. Viator’s volleyball team got off to a slow start on Thursday night. Megan Mueller helped make sure that would not be the case in Set 2. Taking her cues from assistant coach Jimmy Neill, the 5-foot-5 sophomore defensive specialist served for the first 8 points of the second set and the Lions never looked back in a 25-23, 25-14 triumph in the Cahill Gymnasium.

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    Dundee-Crown surprises Jacobs

    Let the battle lines be drawn. Last Thursday, Rey Vargas found out his Dundee-Crown soccer club was awarded a No. 4 seed in the regionals, 2 spots behind No. 2 Jacobs, which will be hosting when the postseason begins in two weeks.

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    Burlington Central wins 8th straight

    As the season has gone on the Burlington Central girls volleyball team has gotten more comfortable with its new setter. And as the Rockets have gotten more at ease with Allie O’Reilly, who had to replace her injured sister Kaitlyn, better results have come.

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    Rivals Geneva, Batavia battle for River lead

    Rob Wicinski admits that when he arrived at Geneva as an assistant coach he “just didn’t get” the football rivalry against Batavia. “You’ve got to have two schools to have a rivalry, and they just pounded us,” Wicinski said.

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    Fremd took a big step forward by beating Conant last week, but coach Mike Donatucci’s team faces another tough test this week against Schaumburg.

    Tough call in MSL division title pictures

    The Mid-Suburban League division title pictures may look a little clearer after Friday night but the parity figures to make everything still tough to decipher.

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    Barrington’s Dylan Zyzda slips past Libertyville defenders on opening night.

    Stops a good sign for Barrington

    Barrington has improved defensively from last year and Prospect's offensive line is continuing a strong tradition in football notes from the Northwest suburbs.

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    Grayslake Central running back Joey Valdivia is a three year started and a big reason the Rams are having their bast season in years.

    Valdivia helps Grayslake Central reverse course

    Instead of wishing they were elsewhere on a Friday night, grade school kids with football aspirations in the Grayslake district are now wishing for autographs. And Grayslake Central running back Joey Valdivia is happy to oblige. “Some kid actually asked me for my autograph the other day. He was probably 12,” Valdivia said. “That made me feel pretty good.” The Rams are off to their best-ever start at 5-0 as Crystal Lake Central pays a visit Friday night.

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    Waubonsie Valley’s Alec Meyer on the fairway of the seventeenth hole at the Upstate Eight Conference meet on Thursday, September 29.

    St. Charles E., Waubonsie wins UEC titles

    St. Charles East displayed its resilience with impeccable timing Thursday afternoon at St. Andrews Golf & Country Club in West Chicago.One week after suffering six dual-meet losses, the Saints were a long shot to disrupt the Upstate Eight Conference River Division boys golf standings.

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    Lakes’ Michael Pfeiffer, here running after a catch at Round Lake last fall, is back in action this season after rehabbing a knee injury.

    Lakes-Antioch game drawing big attention

    Before the lights and the action, there were cameras. The big Antioch-Lakes football game tonight, which will leave the winner the only undefeated team in the North Suburban Prairie Division, has generated buzz even beyond Lake County. Early Friday morning from the Lakes gym, a crew from NBC 5 News Today was scheduled to do a segment featuring the game for its “Prep Destination of the Week.” Players and fans from both teams were planning to be in attendance and the segment was scheduled to air sometime between 6:45 a.m. and 8:30 a.m. The show has profiled the most intriguing prep football game in Chicagoland each week as voted on by Facebook users. The Antioch-Lakes game, which received 7,449 of 15,445 total votes, edged tonight’s Batavia-Geneva game by 100 votes.

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    Jacob’s Sean Kozak tees off on the 10th hole during the Fox Valley Conference boys golf meet at Pine Meadow Golf Course in Mundelein on Thursday.

    Cary-Grove’s Kinney, Huntley tops in FVC

    On a wet, windy day, Jarrett Kinney’s even-par 72 — four shots better than McHenry’s Riley Lindholm — captured medalist honors in the Fox Valley Conference tournament at Pine Meadow Golf Club in Mundelein, while Trent Craig turned in Huntley’s top score and led the Red Raiders to top team honors. Huntley, which won the FVC Valley Division with a 5-1 record, shot a 319 to edge Jacobs (322) and claim its first conference championship. McHenry (324), Grayslake Central (326) and Fox Division champ Crystal Lake Central (326) rounded out the top five in the 13-team field.

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    Geneva’s David Goodyear tries to keep the ball in play along the sideline as St. Charles East’s Michael Macek pressures during the Tri-Cities soccer challenge hosted by Batavia High School Thursday.

    Geneva rallies to tie St. Charles E.

    Geneva trailed St. Charles East 1-0, but scored the equalizer with 5:51 remaining, and the two squads settled for a 1-1 draw in a Tri-Cities Challenge/Upstate Eight Conference River Division match at Batavia.

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    Is Red Sox manager Terry Francona’s job in jeopardy after Boston’s stunning late-season collapse?

    Sox GM Kenny Williams has long, tough to-do list

    Now that the White Sox' season has mercifully ended, general manager Kenny Williams has to hire a new manager and then make some big roster decisions.

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    Shortstop Starlin Castro took a quantum leap into the upper echelon of major-league standouts this season and will be the player the Cubs build around in the future.

    Cubs’ 2011 defining moments will impact next season

    The Cubs finished a second straight losing season this week. It was a season full of defining moments. We take a look at a few of those moments and what they may portend for 2012

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    Brian Urlacher had nothing but good things to say about former Bears defensive coordinator Ron Rivera, right, who will bring his Carolina Panthers to town for a Sunday showdown. “He was always fun to be around,” Urlacher said. “He was very knowledgeable.”

    Bears linebackers Urlacher, Briggs loved playing for Rivera

    Ron Rivera played nine seasons as a linebacker for the Bears and later coached in the organization for five years. But he's not sure what kind of reception to expect from fans Sunday at Soldier Field when he comes in as the Panthers' first-year head coach. Bears players, however, have nothing but respect for their former defensive coordinator.

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    Just when it was starting to look like Ryan Grant had shaken off last year’s season-ending ankle injury with a 17-carry, 92-yard rushing performance in the Packers’ victory over the Bears, Grant has missed time in practice with a bruised kidney and his status for their game against Denver on Sunday is unclear.

    Packers RB Grant nicked up again, eager to play

    Ryan Grant spent all of last season trying to get back on the field. Now that he's there, he doesn't want to leave — even with a bruised kidney. The Green Bay Packers running back is unlikely to play Sunday against the Denver Broncos after sustaining the injury late in the Packers' 27-17 victory over the Chicago Bears.

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    Notre Dame tight end Tyler Eifert catches a pass for a 2-point conversion in front of Pittsburgh linebacker Prince Shembo in the fourth quarter Saturday. Eifert is making a name for himself at a school that has a tradition of standout tight ends.

    Notre Dame TE Eifert starting to shine for Irish

    After the biggest game of his career, Tyler Eifert found time to catch a Toby Keith concert in Chicago last Saturday night. Eifert enjoys a number of other country singers, but the Keith concert couldn’t have been more fitting for the rugged Notre Dame tight end. After all, one of Keith’s biggest hits is titled, “How Do You Like Me Now?” The Irish like Eifert plenty.

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    Texas Ranger manager Ron Washington smiles Thursday during a news conference for the AL division series. The Tampa Bay Rays and Rangers are a scheduled play in Game 1 on Friday.

    Gregor and Miles predict the MLB divisional series
    Our baseball experts, Bruce Miles and Scot Gregor, tell us who will win the best-of-five game National League and American League divisional playoff series, which will be shown Friday and Saturday on TBS.

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    Bob LeGere's NFL picks for Week 4

    Bears beat writer Bob LeGere thinks the Bears will cover the spread against the Panthers this week.

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    Wisconsin’s Mike Taylor (53) and Chris Borland (44) are both finally healthy and on the field at the same time. The seventh-ranked Badgers will need both to play major roles against No. 8 Nebraska on Saturday night.

    Wisconsin LBs Borland, Taylor healthy, happy again

    MADISON, Wis. — For most of their careers, the biggest thing Wisconsin linebackers Chris Borland and Mike Taylor had in common were their rehabilitation programs.Now, they are healthy and emerging as key playmakers on the Badgers’ revamped defense, which lost defensive tackle J.J. Watt to the NFL and will face by far its biggest challenge of the season when No. 7 Wisconsin hosts No. 8 Nebraska on Saturday night.“The first Big Ten game is a whole different stage, especially since it’s at night,” Taylor said. “With bringing Nebraska in, it’s an ABC game and there’s a lot of hype. You kind of have to let that be what it is and not really get overwhelmed by that. It’s just another football game, but it is going to be a big game.”The two linebackers will be counted on to attempt to slow Nebraska quarterback Taylor Martinez and tailback Rex Burkhead, the cogs in the Cornhuskers’ powerful offense. Both players had serious injuries that could have ended their careers. Coming into the season, Borland and Taylor appeared in just eight games together including seven in 2009 before Taylor injured his knee and one last season before Borland needed shoulder surgery.“(I’m) a big believer that the only way you get good at football is playing football,” Wisconsin coach Bret Bielema said. “Those two guys, you can see them kind of feed off one another. And something I don’t really pick up during the course of the game, but when you watch the film on Sunday, every time those guys are getting up, they usually are slapping each other or clapping. There’s just so much energy there that’s really fun to watch.”Borland was the Big Ten freshman of the year in 2009, but hurt himself early last year. In the offseason, he switched positions, moving to inside linebacker to take over relaying the calls for the defense. The coaching staff tried to bring him back slowly because Borland wanted to go harder than his body was ready for, and the lack of practice helped him think more about plays as they developed.It helps to have Taylor back, too. Taylor’s career is pockmarked with surgeries — his hip, his hamstring, his knee twice. Since both have been on the field together, Borland is first and Taylor second in tackles, with the two combining for nearly 25 percent of Wisconsin’s stops. “Their linebackers plug holes and shed blockers real well,” Burkhead said. “That’s the biggest thing from watching them on film. They’ll show their head in one hole and kind of throw the blockers off them and get into another hole and get to the running back.”Bielema said Borland is sometimes too aggressive because he has such good field vision.“I always thought great linebackers were guys that were could erase mistakes, and Chris can do that,” Bielema said. “On the same account, he gets ahead of things. He overran two plays on Saturday that were big plays for them. So I think the more games he plays, actually, the more practice he has, the better Chris is going to become and, fortunately for us, he’s gotten better every game.”Borland and Taylor talk often on the field, a role Borland had to prepare himself for when he moved to inside linebacker.“There are certain times where me and Chris will talk before plays, and we’ll discuss what could possibly happen or what to look for,” Taylor said. “It just gives you a sense of confidence knowing that you have a player that can trust you and you trust him. He’ll watch your back if you screw up.”Borland said Taylor sells himself short.“I think he’s playing his best football of his career right now, and that’s fun to see,” Borland said. “It’s good to see him healthy, and I love playing next to Mike. He’s a tremendous player.”And there’s a certain synergy between the two that has helped the Badgers hold opponents to just 34 points over the first four games. Borland said the chemistry he has with the group of linebackers is key.

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    Iowa didn’t exactly reinvent the wheel when it started last week’s game against Louisiana-Monroe in a no-huddle attack, with quarterback James Vandenberg operating from the shotgun. It only felt that way for Hawkeyes fans.

    Hawkeyes sparked by no-huddle offense

    IOWA CITY, Iowa — Iowa didn’t exactly reinvent the wheel when it started last week’s game against Louisiana-Monroe in a no-huddle attack and quarterback James Vandenberg operating from the shotgun.It only felt that way for Hawkeyes fans.Those accustomed to a mix of runs between the tackles, midrange, play-action passes and the occasional shot down the field were jolted by what looked like Boise State in black and gold.It worked, too. Vandenberg led Iowa (3-1) on a 74-yard touchdown drive in the opening 3:21 and 28 points in a high-flying first half. Vandenberg finished with 270 yards and three touchdowns in an easy 45-17 win.The Hawkeyes, who dusted off the no-huddle to pull off the biggest comeback in school history on Sept. 17 against Pitt, will likely continue to use it regularly when they start Big Ten play next week at Penn State after a bye week.“(Vandenberg) has done a great job of keeping his composure, poise,” Iowa offensive coordinator Ken O’Keefe said. “Once he sees it, he can go to work pretty well.” For Iowa, moving to a more open attack has been a byproduct of the program’s makeup in 2011. The Hawkeyes have just one running back they have complete faith in, sophomore Marcus Coker. None of their tight ends — typically a mainstay for a program that produced Dallas Clark, Scott Chandler and Tony Moeaki — has more than four catches through four games. But the Hawkeyes just might have the best three-man receiving corps in school history on their hands.Senior Marvin McNutt is leading the way with 25 catches for 413 yards and four touchdowns and is on pace to break Iowa’s records for yards in a season, 1,037 set by Keith Chappelle in 1980, and Maurice Brown’s 11 TD grabs in 2002.“Over the years up here, with strength and conditioning, he’s really benefitted,” O’Keefe said. “He’s got a unique set of hands.” Junior Keenan Davis isn’t far behind, with 19 receptions for 286 yards and three TDs. Redshirt freshman Kevonte Martin-Manley has chipped in with 14 catches and three more TDs, including a leaping, game-winning score late in the fourth quarter against Pitt. “We’d love to have these guys keep playing the way that they’re playing. That’s what we expect them to do,” O’Keefe said. Iowa’s decision to catch opponents off-guard through the air speaks to the confidence the Hawkeyes have had in Vandenberg for three years now.He is completing 62.8 percent of his passes, a stellar number in an offense that often asks its quarterbacks to make tougher throws than the typical dink-and-run tosses favored by so many programs. He’s also thrown 10 TD passes against just one interception and is quickly putting himself alongside Michigan State’s Kirk Cousins and Wisconsin’s Russell Wilson as the league’s top pure passers. “We trust him. We feel he knows what he’s doing and, he’s a very good leader,” O’Keefe said. “He can communicate what needs to be done and how it can be done, and he can adjust faster.”

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    Indianapolis Colts quarterback Kerry Collins is being evaluated for a possible concussion. Collins had been knocked around for much of Sunday’s game. The Steelers won 23-20.

    Colts QB Collins still out

    INDIANAPOLIS — The Colts are preparing as though Curtis Painter will be their starting quarterback at Tampa Bay on Monday.Kerry Collins is still recovering after suffering concussion-like symptoms Sunday against Pittsburgh and his status remains in doubt. That means the Colts are getting Painter ready for what would be his first NFL start.“You have to,” Colts coach Jim Caldwell said Thursday. “There’s no other way to do it. I had this old adage when I started coaching that you’ve got to coach who shows up. Today, Curtis is practicing and Kerry is not, so obviously, we have to get him (Curtis) ready for the ballgame.”Indy signed quarterback Dan Orlovsky to the active roster on Wednesday to provide depth. Peyton Manning isn’t expected to return until November or December as he recovers from neck surgery.Painter has mostly struggled during his tenure Indianapolis, but he directed the Colts to a game-tying touchdown against Pittsburgh before Ben Roethlisberger led the Steelers to a game-winning field goal.“I think what Curtis has shown is that he’s improved,” Caldwell said. “He has been able to do it consistently, just get a little bit better six inches at a time. He’s familiar with our system, and I think he’ll function very well.”The third-year pro feels he’ll be ready if called upon.“It certainly would be a great opportunity,” Painter said. “I’d enjoy that and I’m sure it would be a lot of fun. Big game, Monday night game, so it would be very exciting.”Painter received the bulk of the work with the starters during training camp.“The biggest thing that helped me was this camp, getting a ton of reps,” he said. “I think the biggest thing is being comfortable with the offense.”The Colts’ injury problems at quarterback have led to speculation that Indy might try to sign another veteran, including David Garrard. Owner Jim Irsay, however, tweeted this week that the Colts don’t have the salary for certain moves.“Thanks 4 some of the supportive comments, but u have to understand, this isn’t fantasy football, caps at 121 Mil., we’re 128, no room 4 Garrard,” he wrote.Collins was a late pickup during training camp who still is learning the offense. That will work against him if he doesn’t recover quickly.“You can’t get those snaps back, and preparation is important for a guy that’s new in the system,” Caldwell said.Painter admits he was caught off guard a bit against Pittsburgh, in part because he didn’t realize that Collins was hurt right away. Now that he has practiced with the first unit all week, he expects Monday’s game to go more smoothly if he plays.“It’s one thing to get mental reps, kind of watching other people do it, and it’s another to actually be in there with the guys and getting actual reps,” he said.

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    Beau Baumert, of Omaha, displays his tickets to the Nebraska-Wisconsin game Wednesday while wearing his black Husker shirt, in Omaha, Neb. Baumert wanted to make sure he had seats to Nebraska’s Big Ten game against Wisconsin, so he and his roommate bought a pair of upper-deck season tickets from Wisconsin for $700 this summer. As many as 30,000 Cornhuskers fans are expected to migrate to Madison, and most of them will be forced to watch Nebraska’s inaugural Big Ten game from outside the stadium.

    Tickets or not, Nebraska fans heading to Wisconsin

    Wisconsin officials tout Saturday night’s game against Nebraska as the toughest ticket ever at 94-year-old Camp Randall Stadium.As many as 30,000 Cornhuskers fans are expected to migrate to Madison, Wis., Badgers athletic director Barry Alvarez said Wednesday. Most probably won’t get into the stadium to watch Nebraska’s inaugural Big Ten game.Beau Baumert of Omaha, Neb., and his roommate, Jared Lubbe, wanted to make sure they had seats, so they bought a pair of upper-deck season tickets from Wisconsin for $700 this summer.“I knew last year that this game would be extremely hard to get a ticket for,” said Baumert, a 26-year-old gas pipeline engineer. “We started looking for ways in January. In late June or early July the Badgers’ Web page said they would release season tickets for purchase and that it would be the only way to get tickets to this game.”Wisconsin spokesman Brian Lucas said the school had 404 season tickets available for sale and that 67 of them were bought by people with Nebraska addresses. Each buyer was limited to four tickets.Under Big Ten rules, a school is allotted 3,000 tickets for road games. Nebraska received requests for 20,000 for this one.Fans willing to pay a premium could try their luck on the secondary market. Brokers were asking $200-$500 Wednesday for a ticket with a $49 face value.Many ticketless Nebraska fans aren’t deterred. They’re heading to Madison in droves.Mike Huffman, a 52-year-old physician from Lincoln, Neb., said he’ll fly to Madison with two friends with the understanding that they’ll pay no more than $200 apiece on the street for a ticket. If the price isn’t right, he said, they’ll be content to soak up the atmosphere from a local watering hole or the tailgate area.“This is a historic event. Man, I can’t miss it,” Huffman said. “I’ve got to be there. It’s one of those bucket-list things. I’m pretty sure I’d regret it if I didn’t go.”Brent Gries, a 51-year-old bar owner from Paxton, Neb., is loading up his Dodge pickup and heading to Madison with two friends. If they can find tickets for $100 or less, they’ll go inside the stadium. Otherwise, they’ll go to a bar or tailgate in Badgerville, an area north of the stadium that can accommodate 5,000 people with big-screen TVs and will be open throughout the game.Mike Fields, 33, a University of Nebraska web designer from Lincoln, said he and his wife and in-laws are driving an RV to Madison to mark the occasion of the Huskers’ first Big Ten game. He said he probably wouldn’t buy a ticket for any price. He said the Huskers have let him down too many times in big games, and they’re 9½-point underdogs.“I may be kicking myself a bit if we win and I wasn’t there,” Fields said, “but it might be worse if I spent the money and was there and we lost. I have a slim suspicion we might not be competitive.”Adding luster to the game is that it’s the first in Madison since 1962 that two teams ranked in the top 10 will square off. Wisconsin is No. 7 and Nebraska is No. 8.Wisconsin officials are hopeful the locals won’t give into temptation and sell tickets to Nebraska fans, many of whom will be wearing black instead of their traditional red so they stand out among the red-clad Badgers fans.The last thing the Badgers want is for Nebraska fans to take over their stadium the way they did at Notre Dame in 2000, when about half the crowd of 80,000 wore red as the Huskers beat the Irish.“I think the reason you’d have a season ticket here at the University of Wisconsin would be to see a game like this,” coach Bret Bielema said. “I know Nebraska has their little black-shirt mojo going, so I’m sure there’ll be a few of them who get in the stands. But hopefully the Wisconsin fans stand strong and wear the red and make that environment second to none.”

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    Evan Longoria, right, celebrates with teammates after his home run in the 12th inning against the New York Yankees. The Rays defeated the Yankees 8-7 and won the AL wild card.

    What a finish! Rays, Cards clinch playoff spots

    A startling rally by the Tampa Bay Rays, a season saved by a guy hitting only .108. A total collapse by the Boston Red Sox, on one more ball that just got away. Another big win by Chris Carpenter and the St. Louis Cardinals. Another near-miss for Chipper Jones and the Atlanta Braves. A frenzied finish all over the majors on Wednesday night, more than any fan could've asked for. And it's not even October yet.

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    Two of the WNBA’s top defensive standouts, Indiana’s Tamika Catchings, left, and the Chicago Sky’s Sylvia Fowles battled for a rebound. On Thursday, Fowles edged Catchings for the league’s Defensive Player of the Year honors.

    Sky’s Fowles snares WNBA defensive honors

    Chicago Sky Center Sylvia Fowles has been named the 2011 WNBA Defensive Player of the Year, the WNBA announced today. Fowles received 19 out of 40 votes one more than the runner-up, Indiana Fever forward Tamika Catchings.

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    Former teammate Tom Thayer says Bears legend Walter Payton, shown here outside his Thirty Four's restaurant in Schaumburg, was the “most gracious” superstar he ever saw off the field.

    Thayer: Payton book won't diminish his greatness

    The Walter Payton described by author Jeff Pearlman in a new book, which tarnishes the legend of the Hall of Fame running back, is not the Payton that former teammate Tom Thayer knew. "He was the ultimate, most gracious superstar to the general public that I've ever seen. And that's the way I remember Walter.”

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    Brian Owens

    Football: Week 5 MVPs
    Brian Owens of Hinsdale Central has been chosen the Daily Herald's offensive MVP for Week 5 of the high school football season, and the defensive MVP honor goes to Nick Caruso of Geneva.

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    New York Giants wide receiver Victor Cruzscores a touchdown with Philadelphia Eagles cornerback Asante Samuel in pursuit Sunday in Philadelphia. Over two games, Matt Ryan and Eli Manning have burned the Eagles defense for 4 touchdowns apiece.

    Fantasy football: Don’t fear Eagles’ defense

    Fantasy football owners should leave their players on the bench when they go play the Eagles, right? Wrong. Philly's defense has plenty of holes.

Business

  •  
    Bank of America plans to start charging customers a $5 monthly debit card fee. The fee will be rolled out starting early in 2012.

    Bank of America to charge $5 monthly debit card fee

    Bank of America plans to start charging customers a $5 monthly fee for using their debit card for purchases. The fee will be rolled out starting early next year. A number of banks, including Chase and Wells Fargo, have either rolled out or are testing such fees.

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    Stocks were buoyed Thursday after Germany’s parliament overwhelmingly approved the strengthening of a bailout fund intended to help European countries mired in debt crises.

    Late-day rally sends stocks higher; Dow rises 143

    NEW YORK — It was another day of big swings in the stock market. The Dow Jones industrial average ended with a gain of 143 points Thursday. On its way there, it surged 260 points shortly after the opening bell, then turned mixed for much of the day. A burst of buying in the last half-hour of trading sent the Dow shooting higher again. Financial stocks had the biggest gains. Traders were relieved that Germany passed a measure to expand the powers of a regional bailout fund. That eased worries that U.S. banks could be buffeted by another bout of turmoil in Europe’s financial system. Travelers Cos. Inc. and Bank of America Corp. led the Dow average higher. Investors struggled to make sense of conflicting reports on the economy. First-time applications for unemployment benefits fell to a five-month low. The government also raised its estimate of economic growth in the April-June period. Other economic reports were weak. A trade group reported that chief executives of the nation’s largest companies are more pessimistic than they were just three months ago. Also, fewer Americans signed contracts to buy homes in August, the second straight month of declines. All of that contributed to another day of ups and downs on the stock market. The Dow Jones industrial average rose 143.08 points, or 1.3 percent, to close at 11,153.98. Travelers led the Dow with a gain of 3.2 percent; Bank of America was close behind, rising 3.1 percent. The Standard & Poor’s 500 index rose 9.34 points, or 0.8 percent, to 1,160.40. Financial stocks rose 2.8 percent, the most of the 10 company groups that make up the S&P. Technology companies lagged the rest of the market. The Nasdaq composite index lost 10.82 points, or 0.4 percent, to 2,480.76. Advanced Micro Devices Inc. plunged 13.7 percent, the most of any stock in the S&P 500, after the company cut its revenue and earnings forecast for the third quarter, saying it was having problems getting its chips made.Retailers and other consumer discretionary stocks also tanked as investors avoided companies that would be most susceptible to an economic downturn. Netflix Inc. fell 11 percent, Tiffany & Co. fell 6.9 percent and Coach Inc. fell 6.1 percent. Analysts said financial markets were likely to remain volatile until more questions were resolved about Europe’s debt crisis and the U.S. economy. “Until we start to see more clarity on policy intervention, we’ll continue to see this intraday, manic market reaction,” said James Dailey, chief investment officer of TEAM Financial Managers Inc. The measure approved by German lawmakers to expand the region’s bailout fund must be approved by all 17 countries that use the euro. The plan will allow the bailout fund to buy government debt and lend money to troubled European countries. Finland approved the measure Wednesday.Analysts cautioned that bank stocks remain vulnerable if Europe stumbles in its efforts to contain its debt crisis. “Investors need to be very careful, because there is still a vast labyrinth of potential challenges that remain to be cleared with regard to Europe,” said Frank Barbera, a portfolio co-manager of the Sierra Core Retirement Fund.About three stocks rose for every one that fell on the New York Stock Exchange. Volume was average at 4.5 billion shares.

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    Credit Suisse Cuts 1-6 Month Commodities Outlook to Neutral

    Credit Suisse Group AG said it cut its one- to six-month outlook for commodities to “neutral.”The six to 12-month plus outlook remains “positive,” the bank said today in an e-mailed report.To contact the editor responsible for this story: Nicholas Larkin at nlarkin1bloomberg.net

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    Euribor-OIS Spread Measure Rises for First Time in Four Days

    Sept. 29 (Bloomberg) -- A measure of banks’ reluctance to lend to one another in Europe rose for the first time in four days, according to a money markets indicator.The Euribor-OIS spread, the difference between three-month Euribor and overnight index swaps, widened to 81 basis points as of 4:45 p.m. in London, from 78 yesterday, Bloomberg data show. The gap reached a 2 1/2-year high of 89 on Sept. 23.German lawmakers today approved an expansion of the euro- area rescue fund, freeing the way for European officials to weigh further measures to bolster Greece and keep the sovereign crisis from spreading. More than a third of participants in a global survey of Bloomberg subscribers say deteriorating European debt will derail the world economy over the next year.“Perceptions of an orderly solution to the European crisis are wobbling,” Bill Blain, a strategist at broker Newedge Group in London, wrote in a note. “There are just too many known and unknown unknowns to face the day with much confidence.”The rate banks pay to convert euro payments into dollars, measured by the three-month cross-currency basis swap was 104 basis points below the euro interbank offered rate, compared with 100 basis points yesterday. The cost was 112.5 basis points under Euribor on Sept. 12, when the swap was the most expensive since December 2008. A basis point is 0.01 percentage point.The one-year cross-currency basis swap was 68.5 basis points less than Euribor from 67 yesterday, Bloomberg data show.ECB DepositsThe ECB said financial institutions increased overnight deposits. Banks left 173 billion euros ($236 billion) with the Frankfurt-based lender yesterday, compared with 164 billion euros Sept. 26 and 197.8 billion euros Sept. 12, the ECB said.Three-month Euribor -- the rate banks say they pay for three-month loans in euros -- increased to 1.550 percent from 1.544 percent yesterday. One-week Euribor fell to 1.220 percent from 1.228 percent.The three-month dollar London interbank offered rate, or Libor, rose for a 15th day to 0.372 percent from 0.369 percent, according to the British Bankers’ Association. That’s the highest since Aug. 12, 2010.The TED spread, or the difference between what lenders and the U.S. government pay to borrow for three months, was little changed at 36.5 basis points.--With assistance from Abigail Moses in London. Editors: Andrew Reierson, Michael ShanahanTo contact the reporters on this story: Keith Jenkins in London at kjenkins3bloomberg.net; David Goodman in London at dgoodman28bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Paul Armstrong at Parmstrong10bloomberg.net; Daniel Tilles at dtillesbloomberg.net

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    Deutsche Bank’s $2 Billion Bond Sale Ends Lenders’ Drought

    Sept. 29 (Bloomberg) -- Deutsche Bank AG raised 1.5 billion euros ($2 billion) from the first sale of public, senior unsecured bonds by a European lender in more than two months, the longest period on record without a deal.Germany’s biggest bank priced the floating-rate notes due October 2013 today at a yield of 98 basis points more than the three-month euro interbank offered rate, according to data compiled by Bloomberg. Deutsche Bank paid a spread of 40 basis points to issue two-year securities in February.“Given the pricing, they probably swallowed a bit before doing it,” said Roger Doig, a London-based analyst at Schroders Plc, which manages the equivalent of about $58 billion in fixed- income assets. “They have a strong investor base domestically and their name is the same as the strongest country in the euro zone. That all helps.”European lenders’ access to the bond market has been hampered as Greece’s flirtation with default worsened the euro- region sovereign debt crisis. The last non-state-owned bank to issue a similar public benchmark bond was UniCredit SpA, Italy’s biggest lender, which sold 1 billion euros of November 2012 floating-rate notes July 13, according to data compiled by Bloomberg.Speculation policy makers are getting to grips with the crisis thawed credit markets this week and paved the way for Deutsche Bank’s deal. German lawmakers backed an expansion of the euro-area rescue fund today.Spread NarrowsThe extra yield investors demand to hold bank bonds instead of benchmark government debt fell to 3.39 percentage points from a record 3.51 percentage points on Sept. 26, according to Barclays Capital’s Euro Aggregate Banking Senior Index.The Markit iTraxx Financial Index of credit-default swaps linked to the senior debt of 25 European banks and insurers fell three basis points to 263, according to JPMorgan Chase & Co. The gauge dropped from 282 basis points at the end of last week.Credit-default swaps pay the buyer face value in exchange for the underlying securities or the cash equivalent should a borrower fail to adhere to its debt agreements.Deutsche Bank raised 118.6 million euros by selling floating-rate notes to domestic investors in July, paying no premium to Euribor, data compiled by Bloomberg show. The Frankfurt-based lender managed the new transaction itself, the data show.“It’s the kind of deal that can come in a very difficult environment,” said Roger Francis, an analyst at Mizuho International Plc in London. “If it’s the start of a trend all the better.”--With assistance from Esteban Duarte in Madrid. Editors: Paul Armstrong, Michael ShanahanTo contact the reporters on this story: John Glover in London at johngloverbloomberg.net; Ben Martin in London at bmartin38bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Paul Armstrong at parmstrong10bloomberg.net

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    H&R Block to get rid of EXPRESSTAX brand

    H&R Block Inc. is stopping service under its EXPRESSTAX brand, which helped people who filed their taxes early and wanted refunds quickly. The news comes a little over two weeks after the nation's biggest tax preparer announced that it won't offer refund anticipation loans next tax season because it's getting more new clients and the appeal of the high-cost loans is shrinking.

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    Dozens arrested in drug raid at Pa. Boeing plant

    More than three dozen people have been charged in a prescription drug sweep that included a raid on a Boeing plant near Philadelphia that makes military helicopters.

  •  
    Google Inc. and Motorola Mobility Holdings Inc. received a request for additional information from the U.S. Department of Justice's antitrust division, lengthening the review of the search giant's proposed takeover.

    Google's Motorola takeover faces longer antitrust scrutiny

    Google Inc. and Motorola Mobility Holdings Inc. received a request for additional information from the U.S. Department of Justice's antitrust division, lengthening the review of the search giant's proposed takeover.

  •  
    Riverwoods-based Discover Financial Services, the top performer this year in the Standard & Poor's 500 Financials Index, said U.S. regulators plan to bring an enforcement case over how the credit-card issuer marketed fee-based products.

    Discover to face FDIC enforcement claim over marketing

    Discover Financial Services, the top performer this year in the Standard & Poor's 500 Financials Index, said U.S. regulators plan to bring an enforcement case over how the credit-card issuer marketed fee-based products.

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    Argentine Stock Movers: Aluar Aluminio, Petrobras, Siderar, YPF

    The following companies are having unusual price changes in Argentine trading. Stock symbols are in parentheses and share prices are as of 11:08 a.m. New York time.The Merval Index rose 0.8 percent to 2,533.39.Industrial companies rose in line with global stocks after U.S. reports tempered concern the economic rebound was in jeopardy and German lawmakers backed expansion of a European bailout fund.Aluar Aluminio Argentino SAIC (ALUA AF), Argentina’s largest aluminum producer, added 1.1 percent to 3.59 pesos.Siderar SAIC (ERAR AF), Argentina’s largest steel producer, increased 1.4 percent to 21.9 pesos.Petrobras Argentina SA (PESA AF), the local unit of Brazil’s state-controlled oil company Petroleo Brasileiro SA, gained 0.8 percent to 6.75 pesos. Crude prices rose today in New York.YPF SA (YPFD AF) fell 0.9 percent to 167.5 pesos. Repsol YPF SA, the Spanish company that is the parent of Argentina’s largest oil producer, urged Petroleos Mexicanos to abandon a shareholder agreement with Sacyr Vallehermoso SA regarding Spain’s Repsol YPF SA.

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    ENRC reshuffle may fail to reverse losses on board conflict

    Eurasian Natural Resources Corp., which has lost almost half its value since its chief executive officer resigned in February, may fail to reverse losses with a board reshuffle as analysts seek clarity on who is in control.ENRC, a ferroalloys producer in Kazakhstan, announced the result of a three-month review of its management yesterday after a conflict prompted CEO Felix Vulis to resign and shareholders voted against rehiring independent directors Richard Sykes and Kenneth Olisa. The management will include six independent directors on a board of 11, handing them a majority.“We are attracted by the commodity mix, but expect the share to trade at a discount until visibility improves on strategy, growth, governance,” Ben Davis and Myles Allsop, analysts in London at UBS AG, wrote in a report today. There is a “risk of disappointment on the degree of change,” they said.Vulis, who stayed on as CEO after resigning to allow the company to seek a replacement, will now remain in his position, while Johannes Sittard, a former CEO, will stay as chairman.ENRC slid 0.5 percent to 576.5 pence at the 4:30 p.m. close in London, after falling 30 percent since the review began June 8 and 46 percent since Vulis offered his resignation on Feb. 4.“The performance of the company was never affected by these issues,” Sittard said in e-mailed response to questions today. “This is a strong, independent and unified board.”‘Shareholder Value’ENRC founders Alexander Machkevitch, Alijan Ibragimov and Patokh Chodiev own 14.6 percent of the London-based company, which makes ferroalloys, iron ore, aluminum and power in Kazakhstan. Machkevitch applied to the U.K. Listing Authority for clearance to be chairman, the Observer reported Sept. 11.The company will seek to maximize “shareholder value” after the review, newly appointed senior independent director Mehmet Dalman said in the e-mail. The company wasn’t studying selecting Machkevitch as chairman, Dalman said yesterday.“We question whether all that much has really changed,” Liberum Capital Ltd. wrote in a note today. “To our mind a number of questions remain and confusion surrounding who ultimately drives the company is likely to linger.”A row between independent directors and major shareholders began August 2009 as Chairman David Cooksey was replaced by Sittard, then CEO, and Vulis was hired, Olisa said on June 10.“We feel problems arose in the first instance because the oligarchs had no direct representative at board level,” Liberum wrote. “Like it or like it not, we feel the appointment of Machkevitch as chairman, together with a majority independent board would have put to bed the issue once and for all.”Glencore Plan?Glencore International Plc, the commodities trader reported to have studied a bid, may still be interested, Liberum said.London’s Sunday Times reported June 12 that Glencore was considering a 12 billion-pound ($19 billion) takeover and had held talks with shareholders. Glencore said in a June 15 statement it was “not in active consideration of an offer.”The U.K. Takeover Panel barred Glencore from bidding for ENRC for six months following the company’s announcement.

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    Ecuador gdp grew 8.8% In second quarter from year earlier

    Ecuador’s gross domestic product expanded 8.8 percent in the second quarter from a year earlier, central bank President Diego Borja said.The economy expanded 2.2 percent in the three months through June from the previous quarter, Borja said today in a speech in Quito.

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    Warsaw bourse operator picked for talks to buy power exchange

    The Warsaw Stock Exchange was picked for exclusive talks to buy state-owned power exchange Towarowa Gielda Energii SA, known as PolPx, Poland’s Treasury Ministry said on its website today.

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    Shell says fire at Singapore refinery has been extinguished

    - Royal Dutch Shell Plc said a fire that has been raging for two days at its refinery in Singapore has been extinguished, the company said in an e-mailed statement.

  •  

    CEOs in U.S. turn more pessimistic on growth

    Chief executive officers in the U.S. turned more pessimistic in the third quarter as sales projections dropped, darkening the outlook for employment and investment, a survey showed.The Business Roundtable’s economic outlook index fell to 77.6, the lowest reading since the last three months of 2009, from 109.9 in the second quarter, the Washington-based group said today. Readings higher than 50 are consistent with economic expansion. Survey participants also reduced forecasts for growth this year to 1.8 percent, compared with a 2.8 percent gain predicted in the prior quarterly survey.“While we see strong business fundamentals in America still, the quarterly survey results reflect increased uncertainty among CEOs concerning the economic climate and business environment,” Jim McNerney, chairman of the Business Roundtable and chief executive officer of Boeing Co., said in a statement today.Sixty-five percent of executives said they expect sales will grow in the next six months, down from 87 percent in the second quarter, the survey showed. Thirty-six percent said they will increase payrolls, a 15-point drop from the previous three months, and 32 percent plan to invest in capital equipment, a decline of 29 percentage points.The survey, taken from Aug. 29 to Sept. 16, represented the responses of 140 company leaders.The Business Roundtable is an association of CEOs of corporations representing a combined workforce of 14 million employees and more than $6 trillion in annual revenue.

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    Smokers Quit With Cheap Remedy Used in Bulgaria for 40 Years

    For as little as $6, there may be a smoking-cessation remedy that actually works.A clinical test of Tabex, sold in eastern Europe for more than four decades, shows that the plant-based medicine can triple smokers’ chances of quitting compared with a dummy pill. The results of a study on 740 people were published today in the New England Journal of Medicine.

  •  

    Dover sells off Crenlo, Paladin Brands
    Dover Corporation said it has completed the sale of Crenlo LLC and Paladin Brands to KPS Capital Partners, LP.Total proceeds from the sale are $290 million, subject to normal post-closing adjustments.

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    Caterpillar, Navistar restructure truck alliance
    Caterpillar and Warrenville-based Navistar will restructure certain aspects of NC (2) Global joint venture as they move to improve the alliance the two companies created to develop, manufacture, sell and support vocational and on-highway trucks for the North America market and the rest of the world.

  •  

    Meijer to sell Sears DieHard batteries
    Sears Holdings has entered into a licensing agreement to distribute DieHard Gold auto batteries at Meijer Corporation’s 194 locations. Earlier this year, Meijer began selling DieHard brand portable power chargers and jump chargers.

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    Supply chain council to unveil certification program
    The Council of Supply Chain Management Professionals (CSCMP) will unveil its new certification program, SCProT, at its annual conference next week in Philadelphia, Pa.

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    U.S. Mortgage Rates Fall to Record as 30-Year Reaches 4.01%

    Mortgage rates in the U.S. fell to the lowest level in Freddie Mac records after the Federal Reserve announced a plan to reduce borrowing costs even further.The average rate for a 30-year fixed loan dropped to 4.01 percent in the week ended today from 4.09 percent, Freddie Mac said in a statement. That’s the lowest in the McLean, Virginia- based company’s records dating back to 1971. The average 15-year rate declined to 3.28 percent from 3.29 percent last week.Yields on 10-year Treasuries, a guide for consumer loans, touched the lowest level in more than a half-century, after the central bank said on Sept. 21 that it would begin a program aimed at boosting the economy and lowering mortgage rates. The effort, called Operation Twist, would replace shorter-term securities in the Fed’s portfolio with longer-term debt. Policy makers also plan to support the home-loan market by reinvesting maturing housing debt into mortgage-backed securities.“Mortgage rates have fallen some ways already, but they probably haven’t fully caught up with the decline in the 10-year Treasury,” Paul Dales, senior U.S. economist at Capital Economics Ltd. in Toronto, said in a telephone interview yesterday. “It’s possible the effects of Operation Twist will drag 10-year yields down further, thereby weighing on mortgage rates more.”Gap in RatesThe gap, or spread, between the average 30-year fixed mortgage rate and the benchmark 10-year Treasury yield widened to 2.26 percentage points last week, the biggest gap since 2009, according to data compiled by Bloomberg. If the spread matched the gap of 1.17 percentage points in February, the 2011 low, home-loan rates now would be close to 3 percent.Homeowners are taking advantage of low borrowing costs to reduce their monthly payments. A Mortgage Bankers Association index of refinancing rose 11 percent in the week ended Sept. 23. The Washington-based trade group’s purchase gauge increased 2.6 percent.Declining interest rates have done little to stimulate the U.S. housing market as the unemployment rate sticks above 9 percent and lenders tighten credit. The number of contracts to purchase previously owned homes fell 1.2 percent in August, following a 1.3 percent decline the previous month, according to a National Association of Realtors index released today.‘Marginal Support’Record-low borrowing costs “are only a marginal support right now,” Michael Feroli, chief U.S. economist at JPMorgan Chase & Co. in New York, said in a telephone interview yesterday. “Mortgage credit is still tight and secondly, on the demand side, households are concerned about the job market and falling house prices.”The S&P Case-Shiller index of home values in 20 U.S. cities decreased 4.1 percent in July from a year earlier, the group reported Sept. 27.Purchases of new houses fell in August to a six-month low, Commerce Department data showed this week. Sales of previously owned homes that month rose to a five-month high, boosted by demand for lower-priced distressed properties, the National Association of Realtors said Sept. 21. The median price dropped to $168,300 from $177,300 in August 2010.

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    Fewer people applied for unemployment benefits

    The number of people seeking unemployment benefits fell sharply last week, an encouraging sign that layoffs are easing. Weekly applications dropped 37,000 to a seasonally adjusted 391,000, the Labor Department said Thursday. That’s the lowest level since April 2 and the first time applications have fallen below 400,000 since Aug. 6.Some of the improvement was due to technical factors related to the seasonal adjustment of the data, a Labor Department spokesman said. The spokesman also said some states reported higher applications in previous weeks due to Hurricane Irene.As a result, the drop “may not be as encouraging as it looks,” said Paul Dales, an economist at Capital Economics. “Further falls will be needed before we can conclude a downward trend is underway.”Applications typically need to fall below 375,000 to signal substantial job growth. They haven’t been that low since February. The four-week average, a less volatile measure, fell to 417,000, the first drop in six weeks. Most recent evidence shows the job market is sluggish and the economy is weak.The economy expanded only 1.3 percent in the April-June quarter, the Commerce Department said in a separate report Thursday. That’s a mild improvement from last month’s estimate of 1 percent growth.Most economists expect growth will pick up a bit in the second half of this year, but not enough to lower the unemployment rate. A forecasting panel for the National Association for Business Economics predicts total growth for 2011 will be just 1.7 percent.Consumers are reluctant to spend, with unemployment high, wages stagnant, and gas prices at about $3.50 a gallon. Consumer confidence plunged in August to recessionary levels, after lawmakers battled over raising the government’s borrowing limit and Standard & Poor’s cut its rating on long-term U.S. debt. That sent the stock market sharply lower, which hurts consumers’ ability to spend.Retail sales were flat in August, a sign the turmoil caused consumers to pull back.Anemic growth has prompted many businesses to pull back on hiring. Employers added no net jobs in August, the worst showing in almost a year. The unemployment rate was stuck at 9.1 percent for the second straight month.Investors also worried last week that Europe won’t be able to prevent Greece from defaulting and worsening the region’s debt crisis. That sent the U.S. stock market down 6.4 percent, its biggest weekly loss since October 2008, in the midst of the financial crisis.If Greece defaults, that could destabilize other indebted countries, such as Portugal, Ireland and Italy. It could also harm many of Europe’s banks, which own Greek debt.If European banks hoard cash to make up for their losses and stop lending to their U.S. counterparts, that could restrict credit in the United States and slow the economy. And a financial crisis in Europe would reduce U.S. companies’ exports and sales to the region.The slow growth and turmoil have raised fears that the U.S. economy could enter another recession. Some economists put the odds as high as 40 percent.The latest sign of a weak job market came Wednesday, when the Conference Board said its index of online help-wanted ads fell by 1.1 percent to 3.95 million. Openings have fallen by about 500,000 in the past six months, the group said, after jumping by more than 750,000 in the first three months of the year.Instead of hiring, companies are spending on new equipment. A key measure of business investment plans rose 1.1 percent in August, the Commerce Department said Wednesday. Companies ordered more machinery, computers and communications equipment.That’s a good sign, because it shows that businesses are sticking with their investment plans, despite recent signs of economic weakness.

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    Amazon tablet to grow market without being ‘ipad killer’

    Amazon.com Inc.’s Kindle Fire is poised to help Chief Executive Officer Jeff Bezos lure bargain tablet-computer shoppers. It’s unlikely to dislodge Apple Inc. from its perch at the top of the market.The Kindle’s $199 price, at less than half the cost of Apple’s most affordable iPad tablet, holds appeal for consumers who want a low-priced machine for reading books and watching movies, said Herman Leung, an analyst at Susquehanna Financial Group. Consumers who want a bigger screen or the ability to chat over video will probably stay loyal to Apple, Leung said.Bezos may ship as many as 4 million units of the Kindle Fire this year, in part by undercutting Apple, said Brian Blair, an analyst at Wedge Partners Corp. in New York. Still, Amazon will need to release a larger version with a faster processor to siphon share from the iPad, which according to EMarketer Inc. had 85 percent of the market at the end of 2010.“I don’t see this as an iPad killer,” said Leung, who is based in San Francisco. The Kindle Fire “caters to a much lower-end consumer. A bigger screen and a more powerful processor over time -- those are the two main things that will enable them to get there.”The Kindle Fire will have a 7-inch display, smaller than Apple’s iPad, the company said at an event in New York yesterday. The device will run on Google Inc.’s Android software and have a dual-core processor, Seattle-based Amazon said. The Kindle Fire offers Wi-Fi connectivity and comes with a 30-day free trial of Amazon Prime, the company’s $79-a-year membership service that includes streaming video and free two-day shipping.Tablet Market GrowthAmazon is angling to grab a piece of a market that Cambridge, Massachusetts-based Forrester Research Inc. predicts will grow 51 percent a year through 2015. The company’s shares rose yesterday on optimism that the Kindle Fire will avoid the fate that befell tablets from Hewlett-Packard Co. and Research In Motion Ltd., which failed to gain traction with consumers.Amazon rose $1.50 to $231.21 at 9:48 a.m. New York time in Nasdaq Stock Market trading. The stock has risen 28 percent this year.The company’s next device must offer more built-in features, such as video chat, an upgrade to the dual-core processor and the option of a bigger screen, said Wedge Partners’ Blair. The Kindle Fire also lacks a microphone or a connection to a 3G wireless network.Amazon will have to beef up its application store after the company said one offered by Google won’t be available, said Colin Sebastian, an analyst at Robert W. Baird & Co. in San Francisco.IPad’s Advantage“The iPad looks a little more elegant to the eye,” Sebastian said. “The iPad’s more powerful, and when you restrict it to Amazon’s Android app market, you’re missing a lot.”Apple leads the market for mobile applications, the downloadable software that lets users access games, tools and other information. It boasts more than 425,000 -- more than 100,000 of them custom-designed for the iPad.While the new Kindle will add to Amazon’s sales, estimated by analysts to rise 32 percent to $64.6 billion in 2012, the company may disappoint if the tablet doesn’t bring in revenue quickly, Steve Weinstein, an analyst at Pacific Crest Securities in Portland, Oregon, said in a note this week.Sales of Amazon’s electronic books, movies and music on the device may help make up for the narrower profit margins that are likely to result from the low price, Blair said. He expects Amazon to sell out of the device this year.‘Powerful’ Kindle Fire“I don’t think it’s a question of stealing customers yet,” Blair said. “But it’s an iTunes-like offering of content, and that’s powerful. The number of people who really want the front-facing camera are going to be small relative to the people who want to pay $199 for this thing.”

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    U.S. meat and poultry production may drop as much as 5 percent next year, sending beef and pork prices to a record amid climbing feed costs and shrinking herds, according to Rabobank International.

    Meat supply's 'precipitous' drop spurs record price

    U.S. meat and poultry production may drop as much as 5 percent next year, sending beef and pork prices to a record amid climbing feed costs and shrinking herds, according to Rabobank International.

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    Alan Mulally, chief executive officer of Ford Motor Co.

    Ford to add 7,000 jobs over the next two years in the U.S.

    Ford Motor Co. Chief Executive Officer Alan Mulally said the automaker plans to add 7,000 jobs over the next two years in the U.S. as it expects the world's largest economy to avoid another recession.

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    Technology is changing the once simple cookbook

    With a box full of carrots and a hankering for something vaguely exotic, Mary-Claire van Leunen turned to her computer for a recipe.

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    Election-year ruling looms for health overhaul

    President Barack Obama's landmark health care overhaul appears headed for a Supreme Court ruling as the presidential election season hits full stride in the coming year.

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    Oil above $82 ahead of Europe debt fund vote

    Oil prices rose above $82 a barrel Thursday in Asia as traders looked to Germany to approve a measure to strengthen a fund intended to help Europe overcome its debt crisis.

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    German parliament passes expanded euro fund

    German lawmakers on Thursday overwhelmingly approved expanding the powers of the eurozone bailout fund, a major step toward tackling the sprawling debt crisis, in a vote that also helped strengthen Chancellor Angela Merkel's coalition government.

Life & Entertainment

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    ABC 7 to expand weekend late newscast to an hour

    ABC 7 Chicago announced Thursday that it will lengthen its Saturday and Sunday late newscasts, becoming the first station in Chicago to provide an hour of news coverage starting at 10 p.m. on the weekends.

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    Anna Faris, left, and Chris Evans dig up the scoop on her former lovers in "What's Your Number?"

    ‘What's Your Number?' fails to add up

    Hollywood's new age of realistically raunchy, female-driven romantic comedies takes a step backward with “What's Your Number?”, a dollop of forgettable fluff that's as dull and predictable as they come. As she usually does, Anna Faris comes through with a spirit and quirkiness far more engaging than the material merits, but it's difficult to get caught up in what essentially is a one-note gag.

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    Chicago-based Millar Brass Ensemble will open Wheaton College’s Artist Series Friday at Edman Memorial Chapel. The series enters its 62nd year and once again offers $5 tickets for area students.

    Brass ensemble opens Wheaton College’s Artist Series

    Wheaton College's 62nd installment of its Artists Series begins Friday with a performance by Chicago's Millar Brass Ensemble.

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    Ian (Robert Jordan Bailey, left) is troubled as he listens to the widower John (Gary Simmers) during a therapy session in THE ghostly drama “Shining City” by Buffalo Theatre Ensemble.

    Buffalo Theatre Ensemble creates chilly, ghostly ‘City'

    Deceitful Irish husbands are shown in an unflattering light in Buffalo Theatre Ensemble's well-performed "Shining City" at College of DuPage's McAninch Arts Center in Glen Ellyn.

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    Oscar nominee Bruce Davison stars as St. Charles Police Chief Kirkhoven in “Munger Road,” directed and written by St. Charles filmmaker Nicholas Smith.

    St. Charles-set horror tale familiar but effective

    "Munger Road" combines the best elements of "The Blair Witch Project," "Halloween" and "Psycho" to create an exciting first indie horror thriller from St. Charles filmmaker Nicholas Smith, who also nabbed Oscar nominee Bruce Davison to play the role of the St. Charles police chief.

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    Ken (Patrick Andrews, left) and Mark Rothko (Edward Gero) work feverishly to prime a canvas for one of Rothko's murals in Goodman Theatre's production of “Red.”

    Goodman's ‘Red' offers complex, comical, portrait

    John Logan's one-act, two-person play “Red,” now at Chicago's Goodman Theatre, seems conflicted about its main character, the Abstract Expressionist artist Mark Rothko, which is appropriate in that Rothko was apparently conflicted in himself, even as he displayed a near certainty about his life's work.

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    Witness Faheem Muhammad testifies during the second day of Conrad Murray's involuntary manslaughter trial in the death of pop star Michael Jackson.

    Jackson doctor collected vials, witness says

    The first bodyguard to reach Michael Jackson's bedroom after the singer's doctor called for help testified Thursday that he was told by the physician to gather medicine vials before calling 911. Alberto Alvarez said Dr. Conrad Murray grabbed the vials form a nightstand next to Jackson, who was still in his bed.

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    Gene Weygandt and Susie McMonagle star in the Chicago area premiere of “Snapshots” a new show showcasing the music and lyrics of Stephen Schwartz and featuring songs from “Pippin,” “The Baker's Wife,” “Godspell” and “Wicked,” among others.

    ‘Snapshots' worth a second look

    Northlight Theatre premieres "Snapshots," a pleasantly familiar show comprised of music by composer Stephen Schwartz made better by an earnest, committed six-person cast headed by veterans Susie McMonagle and Gene Weygandt.

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    Mary Beth Riley of Elk Grove Village

    Online votes push Cooks of the Week to 2nd round

    The early weeks belonged to the newbies but this week two former Cooks of the Week - Mary Beth Riley and Mark Clemens - garnered big support from online voters to push them into the second round of the Cook of the Week Challenge.

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    Wilco’s “The Whole Love”

    Wilco’s ‘The Whole Love’ is wholly enjoyable

    With a burst of distortion, Wilco delivers a sonic blast at the outset of “The Whole Love” that’s a sign of what is to come over the 12 songs that span the spectrum from plaintive ballad to all-out rockers.

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    Classic Italian Pasta sauce comes together in a mere 20 minutes. The recipe makes enough for dinner tonight with plenty leftover.

    Penne all’Arribbiata
    Penne all Arribbata: desperation Dinners

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    Classic Italian Pasta sauce comes together in a mere 20 minutes.

    Italian perfection from a non-Italian kitchen

    Sometimes a pasta sauce comes along that absolutely captivates me. That's exactly what happened on my recent trip to the French and Italian Riviera. Today's pasta sauce is so pure, so simple and yet so different from anything I've ever eaten. I wonder how I've missed it this long.

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    Adam (Joseph Gordon-Levitt), left, and Kyle (Seth Rogen) deal with the implications of cancer in “50/50,” based on the experiences of Hollywood screenwriter Will Reiser.

    ‘50/50' beats the odds against a comedy about cancer

    The fact-based '50/50" traces how comedy writer Seth Rogen and his friend Will Reiser (played by Joseph Gordon-Levitt) used humor and friendship to cope with the cancer that attacked Reiser's spine.

Discuss

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    ‘Common sense’ murky in Dist. 128 pool dilemma

    A Daily Herald editorial says that the health and safety of students must be the prime consideration in any decision to extend the deadline to fix hazardous swimming pool drains.

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    Obama’s liberal tantrum

    Columnist Michael Gerson: A wise government will empower individuals — through education, job training and the like — to better compete in the economic race. Yet in a free society, the most important goal is not a fair outcome but a fair chance — not economic equality but social mobility in a dynamic economy.

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    The English fluency challenge

    Columnist Esther J. Cepeda: There’s no reason public school students — especially those just learning how to speak English — should be in classrooms with teachers who don’t have a high level of English fluency.

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    How breaking sports news affects other decisions

    Columnist Jim Slusher: The sudden news that Ozzie Guillen was out as manager of the Chicago White Sox had an effect on more than just the sports pages.

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    If we build it we will thrive
    Letter to the Editor: When you really want our country to return to what we knew 30 and 40 years ago, you will buy American made products again. Uh, oh — you noticed we no longer have the capability to do so, now what?

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    Learn how to help those with epilepsy
    Letter to the Editor: All Americans deserve to have clear, concise information about epilepsy and seizures at their fingertips and right now Congress is offering a great opportunity to help many people, including school personnel, first responders, employers and community workers better understand epilepsy and how to help when someone has a seizure.

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    Pancreatic cancer bill needs support
    With a five-year survival rate of just 6 percent, pancreatic cancer has the lowest relative survival rate of all the cancers tracked by the American Cancer Society and the National Cancer Institute. It is the fourth-leading cause of cancer death in the U.S. The good news is that there is currently a bill that would change these statistics

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    Thanks for helping end hunger, literally
    On behalf of everyone at Literacy DuPage and Loaves & Fishes, we would like to extend a heartfelt thank you to Mayors Michael Gresk and George Pradel, Wheaton and Naperville city councils, Alphagraphics, the Ink Well, Party City, and the 70 participating businesses for supporting Literally Ending Hunger Together Day on Sept. 15.

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