New DH calendar

Daily Archive : Tuesday August 30, 2011

News

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    Northwest suburban police blotter

    A 25-year-old Des Plaines man was charged with battery after reports he and another man got out of a car on the 1300 block of Pine Street, flashed gang signs, and punched and kicked a man in the head while he was walking his dog.

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    Mike Potter of Mount Prospect, playing a violin that is more than 250 years old; Bill Morris of Glen Ellyn, playing a rare chord harmonica; and Ron Novit, of Lincolnshire, playing a banjo, have an impromptu jam session shortly after meeting each other at last year's Fox Valley Folk Music and Storytelling Festival in Geneva. This year's festival is set for Sunday and Monday.

    Folk Fest fun for everyone returns to Fox Valley

    This weekend, Geneva's Island Park will come alive with story and song, when the 35th annual Fox Valley Folk Music and Storytelling Festival comes to town. Sit on the grass or under the big tent near the beautiful Fox River, and spend either or both days, from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m., soaking in the sounds of traditional and roots folk music on eight concert and workshop stages, with more than 36 top...

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    Jacob Rigby went missing after a hike on Sunday in the Glacier National Park in Montana, where he was a seasonal worker.

    Crews searching for Johnsburg hiker at Montana national park

    A major search is underway for a 27-year-old Johnsburg man who went for a hike in Glacier National Park in Montana Sunday and never returned.

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    Carolyn Kuhn of Naperville holds the diploma of her great-grandfather Al Lisson Sr., who was part of the class of 1901 North Central College. The institution was called North Western College when Lisson attended.

    Naperville family shares legacy of tractors, learning

    Carolyn Kuhn has been around tractors ever since she can remember, though she's never lived on a farm. She grew up in Naperville and this year will drive her grandfather's vintage John Deere tractor in the Last Fling Labor Day Parade.

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    Wayne Sabaj, left, and his father Mitchell, both agreed to turn the bags of money in to the police.

    Johnsburg man finds more than $100,000 in his garden

    Wayne Sabaj found between $100,000 and $200,000 inside two grocery-style plastic bags in his backyard garden and contacted police Monday afternoon as a precaution that the bills could be linked to a crime, said McHenry County Undersheriff Andrew Zinke

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    Sears Holdings Corp. CEO Lou D'Ambrosio met with Senate President John Cullerton at the company's Hoffman Estates headquarters Tuesday.

    Senate president meets with leaders of Sears

    Sears Holdings Corp. CEO Lou D'Ambrosio met with Illinois Senate President John Cullerton Tuesday about the company's future in its Hoffman Estates headquarters. Sears' tax-incentive deal with the village expires next year.

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    FOIA changes create 'nuisance' class, critics say

    Changes to the state's Freedom of Information Act are intended to crack down on abusers, but critics complain the changes create ways for government to abuse powers and slow release of information.

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    St. Patrick football team rekindles memories

    St. Patrick Catholic School in St. Charles has formed a fifth- and sixth-grade football team, which has columnist Dave Heun thinking back to his days at Catholic school in Naperville.

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    Carol Sente

    ComEd not on hot seat at Lincolnshire meeting

    A gathering with ComEd officials at the Vernon Area Public Library in Lincolnshire went calmly, with the audience asking about outages caused by this summer’s record storms, ComEd’s proposed smart grid and other matters.

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    Ex-customs official headed to prison for bribery

    A former customs official convicted of accepting bribes to enable foreign restaurant workers and their spouses to remain in the U.S has been sentenced to 46 months in prison.

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    Congressman Peter Roskam tours Bensenville’s Chicago White Metal Casting on Tuesday with its president and CEO, Eric Treiber.

    Roskam: Job growth tied to cutting regulations

    Rules on lunch meat marketing and on truck emissions were among government regulations described as "job killing" by House Chief Deputy Whip Peter Roskam, of Wheaton. Roskam spent Tuesday talking wiith suburban businesses.

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    Smoke from a building fire on Thatcher Road fills the sky in Maple Park Tuesday afternoon.

    Dog killed, house gutted by Maple Park fire

    Firefighters arrived at the ranch home on the 49W500 block of Thatcher Road just after 12:25 p.m. and found the house ablaze, said Maple Park Fire Chief Kevin Peterson.“It was pretty involved when we got on the scene,” Peterson said. “Shortly after we arrived, it was going through the roof. It was a defensive effort to start with.”

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    Marc and Janina Leibowitz were wed at Riverside Farm in Pittsfield, Vt., on Saturday. The couple remains stranded with 60 of their wedding guests in Pittsfield Tuesday, after Tropical Storm Irene washed away bridges and their main road out on Sunday.

    Irene crashes and stays at Vermont wedding

    Marc Leibowitz and his fiance, Janina Stegmeyer, were wed at a Vermont inn on Saturday. Since then, they've been stranded in Pittsfield, Vt., with about 60 of their wedding guests because Tropical Storm Irene washed away bridges and their main road out.

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    Jeff Werfel

    Grayslake politicians running for new county board seat

    Two Grayslake politicians say they plan to be in primaries for their respective parties in a newly created Lake County Board District 6 seat. Veteran Grayslake village Trustee Jeff Werfel,a Republican, and Lake County Board member Pat Carey of Grayslake, a Democrat, formally announced they'll run for the newly created seat.

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    No charges expected in Naperville North alcohol case
    Naperville police say they will not pursue charges against parents of roughly 20 Naperville North High School seniors who consumed alcohol the morning of the first day of classes on Aug. 17.

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    “Historic” settlement for nursing home patients

    Medicaid-eligible people with disabilities in Cook County who have been forced by the state to live in nursing homes will now have the option of living at home and receiving support services there. The change comes as the result of a class-action discrimination lawsuit filed against the state of Illinois on behalf of about 20,000 people with physical disabilities or mental illness.

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    Nunu Sung

    Wheaton woman who abandoned child fights for custody

    A DuPage County judge could decide in October whether an imprisoned mother will regain custody of the son she abandoned under a bush in Wheaton. Judge C. Stanley Austin on Tuesday set Oct. 19 for a hearing on the parental rights of 26-year-old Nunu Sung, who is due to be paroled in January.

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    President Barack Obama addresses the American Legion Annual Conference at the Minneapolis Convention Center in Minneapolis on Tuesday. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

    Obama: 7 proposed regulations would exceed $1 billion

    President Barack Obama says his administration is considering seven new government regulations that would cost the economy more than $1 billion a year, a tally Republicans will pounce on to argue that Congress needs the power to approve costly government rules.

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    Robert 'Bobby' L. Bostic in a 2011 police mug shot.

    Witness: Bostic said Round Lake Beach murder was in 1989, not 1982

    As expected, a witness testified Tuesday he heard Robert Bostic brag that he had killed a man over a drinking bet. However, James Price appeared to shock prosecutors when he testified that Bostic said the murder had happened in 1989, seven years after the crime for which Bostic is on trial.

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    Jailed man charged in murder-for-hire plot

    A Southwest suburban man jailed on a murder charge has been accused of plotting to kill a Will County prosecutor.

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    Chicago man decapitated while fleeing Virginia police

    Police say a Chicago man decapitated himself while trying to flee after a domestic dispute in Yorktown, Va.

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    Karen McConnaughay

    Kane County settles circuit court clerk lawsuit

    Taxpayers will stop funding the lawsuit between the Kane County Board and Circuit Court Clerk Deb Seyller. A settlement was reached Tuesday night.

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    Clearbrook will name a building in Schaumburg in honor of Linda and David Riley of South Barrington

    Clearbrook names building for Linda and David Riley

    Clearbrook will name a building in Schaumburg in honor of David and Linda Riley of South Barrington, two of its longtime volunteers and benefactors.

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    Police reports

    Rodney L. Cook, 40, of the 18N700 block of West Hill Road, near West Dundee, was arrested and charged with criminal damage to property and resisting a peace officer at 2:30 p.m. Sunday, according to sheriff’s reports. Cook, whose house is in foreclosure, is accused of throwing a football at the vehicle of a man from the mortgage company who was taking pictures of Cook’s home in the 18N700 block...

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    Bartlett drivers warned of Labor Day Dash delays

    Bartlett officials are asking drivers to be cautious and prepare for possible traffic delays Sunday morning during the running of the Bartlett Lion’s Labor Day Dash.

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    Bond cut for Elgin sex abuse suspect

    A 58-year-old Elgin man accused of sexaully assaulting a girl he knew was granted a bond reduction by a Kane County judge Tuesday. Jesse C. Martinez will stay with relatives in Bolingbrook and must wear a GPS device while free awaiting trial.

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    Alderman Ron Singer of Geneva trims around headstones as he works with a couple of other volunteers, including Alderman Sam Hill (not pictured) to clean up the West Side Cemetery earlier this year.

    Geneva might privatize cemetery maintenance

    Geneva may outsource maintenance of its two cemeteries, to make them look nicer and maybe save some money. The city council discussed upkeep Monday at an informal committee of the whole meeting.

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    Changing FOIA
    Changes to the state's Freedom of Information Act are intended to crack down on abusers, but critics complain the changes create ways for government to abuse powers and slow release of information.

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    Dance Ensemble registration open

    Registration is open for the 2011-12 Libertyville Dance Ensemble season.

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    Venetian Night set for Island Lake:

    The 15th annual Island Lake Venetian Night will be held Sept. 10.

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    Lake County tourism honors:

    Visit Lake County recognized nine businesses for their long-term partnerships during the organization’s recent Annual Luncheon Meeting at Cuneo Mansion & Gardens.

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    Job fair for veterans:

    A job fair will be held for veterans and military members and their families from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 1 at the Captain James A. Lovell Federal Health Care building 4, Room 102, Bourke Hallo, 3001 Green Bay Road, North Chicago.

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    Wheeling drowning victim likely was caught in rip current

    A 44-year-old Wheeling man drowned in Lake Michigan Sunday, pulled under by a rip current while swimming off a Hagar Township Park beach in southwest Michigan, authorities said Monday.

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    The American Lung Association in Illinois enthusiastically backs a new law that requires insurance companies to offer coverage for smoking-cessation programs.

    New law meant to help smokers kick habit

    The American Lung Association in Illinois says the law could be a tremendous help to tens of thousands of tobacco users who want to quit smoking but can’t afford the services they need to make that happen.

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    A hog from the Unger Show Pigs Farm in Lincoln, Ill., waits for the competition Aug. 8 at the Illinois State Fairgrounds in Springfield.

    State fair attendance up 10 percent

    Attendance at this year’s Illinois State Fair increased 10 percent to more than 817,000. Officials say attendance levels in 2011 were the highest since 2002.

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    Quinn’s liquor panel hires alderman’s daughter

    Gov. Pat Quinn’s Liquor Control Commission has hired a Chicago alderman’s daughter as a part-time secretary for $37,570, making her the latest in a line of politically linked appointees by the administration this year.

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    A CT scan shows a pair of pruning shears embedded in the head of an 86-year-old Green Valley, Ariz., man before it was removed by Medical Center surgeons in Tucson on July 30, 2011. Leroy Luetscher was accidentally impaled through his eye socket after falling on the shears while working in his yard, the handle penetrating his eye socket and reaching down into his neck. He is expected to make a full recovery.

    Wisconsin native describes how shears impaled eye socket

    An 86-year-old man whose eye socket was impaled with a pair of pruning shears said Tuesday he experienced excruciating pain during the ordeal and feels lucky to be alive.

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    CPS chief again pushes longer school day

    Chicago Public Schools chief Jean-Claude Brizard continues to push for a longer school day as he talks about ways to reform the district.

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    The University of Illinois has avoided layoffs as it merges functions and departments by incrementally reducing staff through attrition, officials said.

    U of I says it has saved $26 million

    A University of Illinois panel looking for ways to save money in the school’s administration is nearly halfway toward its goal of saving $60 million over three years, according to a report released Tuesday to The Associated Press.

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    2 arrested after drugs, guns found in Barrington home

    Agents of the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration, local police drug task forces and Barrington police searched the home on the 200 block of West Lincoln Avenue at 6 a.m. Tuesday and found drugs and weapons.

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    Police reports

    Jesiah Van Loon, of the 500 block of Church Street in Batavia, was charged with felony possession of a controlled substance Friday in the 0-100 block of South Jackson Street, according to a police report.

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    Drew Peterson

    Defense pushes for Drew Peterson to be released

    Drew Peterson’s attorneys have asked the Illinois State Supreme Court to order the former police officer released from jail where he’s been held for more than two years on charges of murdering his third wife, saying prosecutors’ appeal to the same court over hearsay evidence has violated his right to a speedy trial. “It’s a matter of fundamental fairness,” said the 57-year-old Peterson’s lead...

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    Chris Carpenter

    Missing Naperville teen found safe at McDonalds

    Naperville police say they have found 16-year-old Chris Carpenter and expect to reunite him with his family Tuesday evening. Carpenter was reported missing Aug. 22 after he failed to attend class at Naperville Central High School and his family believed he may have fled to Colorado.

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    John Adams, left, from the Little Guitar Pickers program, gives a lesson to Brandon Godfrey, 9, and his sister Ashley, 14 of Batavia at the 33rd annual Fox Valley Folk Music and Storytelling festival in Geneva.

    Kids’ activities at the folk festival
    There will be plenty of activities for kids and teens at the 35th annual Fox Valley Music and Stortelling Festival.

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    The municipal center grounds are alive during the first day of Schaumburg’s 2007 Septemberfest.

    Schaumburg Septemberfest this weekend
    The Northwest suburbs' official farewell to summer -- Schaumburg's Septemberfest -- is Saturday-Monday, Sept. 3-5 at the grounds of the Robert Atcher Municipal Center.

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    One of the space shuttles on the launchpad.

    CLC dean captures shuttle history in photos

    Over the years, Roland Miller, dean of Communication Arts at the College of Lake County, used his camera to record shuttle launch history, and along the way found art in the events.

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    Randy Ramey

    State Rep. Ramey charged with DUI

    DuPage County Republican Chairman and state Rep. Randy Ramey was charged Sunday with driving under the influence of alcohol.

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    Thieves stealing manhole covers in Naperville

    Naperville police are searching for the thieves responsible for stealing manhole covers over the past few weeks in the southwest portion of the city where subdivisions are being built. Police say the covers, stamped with “sanitary sewer” or “water,” weigh about 50 pounds.

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    Palatine group has care packages ready to ship to troops

    The Yellow Ribbon Support Group, a nonprofit organization in Palatine that has sent more than 20,000 care packages to troops overseas, will be at Septemberfest in Schaumburg this weekend with boxes ready to be mailed.

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    Members of U.S. Marine Scout-Sniper team look for a Taliban position in a nearby tree line, during an exchange of fire with Taliban militants, in Helmand province, southern Afghanistan, Saturday.

    This month America’s deadliest in long Afghan war

    August has become the deadliest month yet for U.S. forces in the nearly 10-year-old war in Afghanistan, increasing pressure on the Obama administration to bring troops home sooner rather than later.

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    Pfizer Inc.’s just-approved Xalkori is the first new medicine in several years for deadly lung cancer.

    New cancer pill gives hope, strategy

    Pfizer Inc.’s just-approved Xalkori, the first new medicine in several years for deadly lung cancer, shows the value of a new research standard: precisely targeting rare diseases linked to gene variants.

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    Members of the Quinn family, right, embrace outside their home while members of the New York National Guard use heavy equipment to clear debris from a stream that destroyed their family printing business in Middleburgh, N.Y., Tuesday.

    Airlifts take food, water to cut-off Vermont towns

    National Guard helicopters began taking food and water Tuesday to about a dozen Vermont towns cut off by flooding from the rainy remnants of Hurricane Irene in a deluge that took inland areas of New England and upstate New York by surprise with its ferocity.

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    Russian Prime Minister Vladimir Putin, right, and Rex Tillerson, ExxonMobil’s chief executive smile during a signing ceremony in the Black Sea resort of Sochi, Russia, Tuesday.

    Russian firm teams up with ExxonMobil

    Russia’s state-owned Rosneft teamed up with U.S. company ExxonMobil on Tuesday in a multibillion deal to develop offshore oil fields in the Russian Arctic.

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    No Last Fling festival is complete without a few eating contests. This year’s event will feature competitions for brave residents who believe they can eat the most spaghetti, ice cream or pie.

    Naperville’s four-day Last Fling to make a splash

    The Naperville Jaycees' four-day Last Fling celebration proves summer isn't over yet. There's still plenty of time to enjoy the food, music and games of the season -- and maybe even dunk a city official or two.

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    The Gin Blossoms anchor the Saturday music lineup at Last Fling. Tickets for the evening’s concerts are $15.

    Last Fling event schedule
    The Naperville Jaycees' Last Fling runs from Friday, Sept. 2, to Monday, Sept. 5, in downtown Naperville. The summer favorite will include a four-day carnival, business expo, Labor Day Parade and Family Fun Land.

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    Hoffman Estates board gives ComEd deadline to respond about outages

    Hoffman Estates residents angry about their electric service spoke with ComEd representatives at a village meeting Monday night and received few answers.

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    Marc Friedman, in blue, along with fellow coaches in the back row Kyle Sertich, David T. Sertich and David M. Sertich pose with their Bronco Cardinals baseball team after winning the park district league championship.

    Hoffman Estates baseball coaches win park district award

    Combining youth with experience, volunteer baseball coaches Marc Friedman, Dave M. Sertich, Dave T. Sertich and Kyle Sertich received the Best of Hoffman award for their coaching of the Bronco Cardinals baseball team.

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    Cary school board, union to meet again

    Cary Education Association members and the Cary Elementary District 26 school board will return to the negotiating table Wednesday night to try to finalize a contract for the next school year, at least.

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    Barrington Lyric hosts annual gala benefit

    Bass-baritone Benjamin LeClair will be the entertainment, and the 70-acre Hidden Ponds estate is the setting, as the Barrington Chapter, Lyric Opera of Chicago hosts its annual gala benefit on Sept. 18. Sept. 10 is the ticket deadline.

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    Marca Bristo, CEO and President of Access Living, speaks during an interview about a settlement that has been reached in the last of a trio of class-action lawsuits involving the rights of disabled Illinois residents living in large institutions. The settlement paves the way for thousands of people to get help moving from Cook County nursing homes to houses and apartments. Bristo is accompanied by Lenil Colbert, a plaintiff in the lawsuit.

    Deal in Illinois disability lawsuit goes to judge

    A settlement reached in a class-action lawsuit involving the rights of disabled Medicaid residents in nursing homes has been presented to a federal judge in Chicago. The settlement ultimately could affect about 20,000 people with disabilities living in Cook County.

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    Indiana fair victims fund tally more than $240,000
    A fund set up to raise money for those injured in the Indiana State Fair stage collapse now has more than $240,000.

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    Wisconsin protester sues Capitol worker who popped balloon

    A Wisconsin woman is claiming a state Capitol worker violated her constitutional rights by popping a balloon and allegedly slamming her against a door July 25 during a daily singalong, which was an ongoing protest of the state law curtailing collective bargaining rights for public workers.

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    A blazing pickup truck driven by two Gadhafi soldiers, one of them the man on floor near the vehicle, on a recognizance mission that came under fire by Libyan rebels on the front line, 86 miles from Sirte, Libya, Monday.

    Libya rebels pledge assault on Gadhafi stronghold

    Libya Libyan rebels pledged Tuesday to launch an assault within days on Moammar Gadhafi’s hometown, the ousted strongman’s last major bastion of support.

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    Dawn Patrol: Quick hits to start your day

    News you need as you walk out the door today: Overnight high-speed chase, construction in Elk Grove and Wheaton and storms expected late tonight.

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    Maine Township’s Office of Emergency Management, unveiled a new low-power AM radio station to the township’s board of trustees. The station will provide vital information related to disaster recovery programs and to advise residents about special township activities.

    Maine Twp. unveils new emergency radio system

    Maine Township director of Office of Emergency Management Robert Cohen recently unveiled a new low-power AM radio station that will be used for information related to disaster recovery programs.

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    Teens always enjoy the Buffalo Grove Days carnival.

    Charity softball game kicks off Buffalo Grove Days
    Buffalo Grove Days is back, and while the full festival doesn't start until Thursday, fest goers should get over to Emmerich Park Wednesday to support the charity softball game. Once the fest begins, it'll be nonstop music, food, beer, games and carnival rides, for starters.

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    Classic and antique cars of all makes and models sit on display near a cornfield for Kane County Sheriff Pat Perez’s third annual car and motorcycle show fundraiser, which benefited the Figgins Foundation. This year’s show, set for Saturday, Sept. 3, will benefit Special Olympics. The event is held at the Martin family farm in Elburn.

    Sheriff's car, motorcycle show aids Special Olympics

    Kane County Sheriff Pat Perez will host his annual charity car and motorcycle show Saturday, Sept. 3, at the Martin Family Farm, 2S111 Green Road in Elburn. Proceeds from the event will benefit Special Olympics.

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    Graduates of last year’s Citizen Fire Academy gather for a class photo with their instructors and members of the Hoffman Estates Village Board of Trustees.

    Hoffman Citizen Fire Academy to begin Sept. 7

    Learn firsthand what it takes to be a firefighter at the Hoffman Estates Fire Department's 11th annual Citizen Fire Academy.

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    Storm clouds roll into Libertyville with high winds and heavy rain close behind.

    Color spectrum makes sky look green before tornado

    “Red sky at night, sailor’s delight” is an old saying that forecasts good weather. The colors we see in the sky — the red sky of a clear evening sunset or the brilliant colors of a rainbow — come from the electromagnetic spectrum. The spectrum is energy that is radiated in a wavy pattern.

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    Metropolis’ Sunday Soiree gets a makeover

    The annual ladies-only fundraiser for the Metropolis Performing Arts Centre -- the Sunday Soiree -- is getting a makeover this year: New place and some new features. Check it out on Sept. 11.

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    Third annual Palatine Bowl to support NWSRA

    Lavelle Law Ltd. and the Palatine Police and Fire departments have announced the date for the third annual Palatine Bowl to benefit NWSRA.

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    Lavay Smith & Her Red Hot Skillet Lickers will keep the stargazers hopping at the Raue Center’s Stargazers Ball Sept. 23.

    Stargazers Ball to light up the Raue Center in Crystal Lake
    Hundreds of the region’s art supporters will gather for an evening of music, dancing, cocktails, delectable tasting stations and a silent and live auction at Raue Center’s annual “Stargazers Ball” at 7 p.m. Friday, Sept. 23.

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    Ken Gough has participated in Civil War re-enactments for 40 years. He has most recently begun to focus on the Elgin Continentals — one of the first regiments to join the war from Illinois. He is seen here in their uniform.

    Civil War re-enactment — it’s what he loves

    Ken Gough has spent the last 40 years doing Civil War re-enactments, though in more recent years he has stayed away from the battlefield fighting in favor of "living history" presentations. The time period he discovered a passion for in his childhood has introduced him to his wife and developed into a lifelong hobby.

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    Denise Richards' First Communion photo.

    Denise Richards: Suburban upbringing kept me grounded

    Downers Grove native Denise Richards says the values she was raised with helped her through the chaotic years. “Everyone in Downers Grove ... is very grounded and genuine," she says.

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    The Geneva City Council is debating whether to change a law prohibiting most open burning in residential areas.

    Geneva council, residents debate allowing fire pits

    The Geneva city council is considering allowing residents to have chimneys and fire pits, in part because residents apparently are unaware that such devices have long been banned.

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    Schaumburg agencies team up to fight childhood obesity

    A group of Schaumburg organizations are teaming up to fight childhood obesity, amid some startling information about its school population. Among the goals is getting both school cafeterias and local fast-food restaurants to offer healthier choices rather than just traditional options like fries and soda.

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    Long Grove native Declan Sullivan was killed last year when the aerial lift he was on at Notre Dame toppled over due to high winds.

    Long Grove student's death triggers Notre Dame safety program

    The University of Notre Dame has launched a national awareness campaign aimed at improving aerial lift safety. The UpRight! program is supported by the family of student videographer Declan Sullivan, a 20-year-old from Long Grove killed last fall.

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    It's not just burgers and brats, but veggies and even macaroni that gourmet chef Russ Faulk grills up in his back yard. Of course, cooking is easier on Faulk's $15,895 grill.

    Can you still call it a BBQ grill if it costs $16,000 ?

    Rolling the grill onto the patio for this weekend's last big summer cookout? Not if you have this Elmhurst man's backyard complete with $5,000 dishwasher and $16,000 grill, which turns nature into a gourmet experience.

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    St. Charles carnival to benefit literacy volunteers, troop support
    A Labor Day Festival is planned Sept. 1-5 in St. Charles to benefit Literacy Volunteers Fox Valley and Fox Valley Troop Support.

Sports

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    White Sox manager Ozzie Guillen could be headed to Florida to manage the Marlins next season. Or he could be back on the South Side.

    Another Guillen self-inflicted wound

    Ozzie Guillen could have worked for the White Sox forever. But his self-destructive nature will force Jerry Reinsdorf to fire Guillen sooner or later, probably sooner.

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    Kenny Williams and Ozzie Guillen are the ones more likely to incur chairman Jerry Reinsdorf's ultimate wrath.

    ‘Grumpy' Reinsdorf watching final month closely

    As the White Sox head into the final month of the season, there is more at stake than a playoff berth. Jobs are on the line — and general manager Kenny Williams and manager Ozzie Guillen both could be in big trouble if the Sox fail to win the AL Central.

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    Tuesday’s girls volleyball scoreboard
    High school varsity results from Tuesday's girls volleyball matches, as reported to the Daily Herald.

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    Tuesday’s girls tennis scoreboard
    High school varsity results from Tuesday's girls tennis meets, as reported to the Daily Herald.

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    Tuesday’s girls swimming scoreboard
    High school varsity results from Tuesday's girls swimming meets, as reported to the Daily Herald.

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    Tuesday’s girls golf scoreboard
    High school varsity results from Tuesday's girls golf meets, as reported to the Daily Herald.

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    Tuesday’s girls cross country scoreboard
    High school varsity results from Tuesday's girls cross country meets, as reported to the Daily Herald.

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    Tuesday’s boys soccer scoreboard
    High school varsity results of Tuesday's boys soccer matches, as reported to the Daily Herald.

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    Tuesday’s boys cross country scoreboard
    High school varsity results from Tuesday's boys cross country meets, as reported to the Daily Herald.

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    Tuesday’s boys golf scoreboard
    High school varsity results from Tuesday's boys golf meets, as reported to the Daily Herald.

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    Mundelein handles Glenbrook North

    Mundelein d. Glenbrook North: Ashley Dolin had 7 blocks and 3 kills, and Karolina Sierzputowska added 4 blocks and 3 kills, as the Mustangs prevailed 27-25, 25-20.Brittany Busscher contributed 3 kills and 5 aces for Mundelein (2-2). Karen Chin set 37 of 38 with 10 assists. Madi Wilcox (2 blocks) and Courtney Perreault had 2 kills apiece.Wauconda d. Marengo: Megan Tallman’s 6 kills, 5 aces and 16 assists paced the Bulldogs in their 25-18, 25-13 win.Wauconda (2-1) also got 6 kills from Erinn Hellweg and four from Susan Karhoff. Rebecca Thiltgen and Hellweg led the team with 9 kills apiece.Evanston d. Warren: Paige Jesperson had 3 kills for the Blue Devils, who fell to 1-3 with a 25-12, 25-19 loss.Highland Park d. Round Lake: The Panthers fell 26-24, 23-25, 25-18, despite Izzy Rodriguez’s 5 kills.Dominique Gonzales and Kailey Parlogean posted 3 blocks apiece for Round Lake. Bianca Duna served 3 aces and set 35 of 35 with 4 assists.

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    Bitta, Libertyville edge Jacobs

    Junior Austin Bitta scored his first two goals of the season, and Libertyville’s boys soccer team edged host Jacobs 3-2 in Algonquin on Tuesday night.David Ruiz also scored for Libertyville, which improved to 3-0, while Lloyd Chatfield tallied 2 assists. Marshall Hollingsworth assisted on Bitta’s first goal.Wildcats keeper Zach Labrum made 7 saves.Stevenson 2, Mundelein 0: The Patriots got second-half strikes from Zach Erny and Mike Weinstein in the North Suburban Lake Division opener.Joe Hugener and Ross Comitor had assists for Stevenson (3-0-2). Jacob Azriel and Quentin Low made 4 and 2 saves, respectively, to share the shutout.

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    Heelan leads Mundelein

    Boys golfMundelein d. Wauconda: At Steeple Chase Golf Club, Grant Heelan’s even-par 36 led the Mustangs (153) past the Bulldogs (187).Mundelein also got a 37 from Brett Cigelnik, a 39 from Derek Parola and a 41 from Dave Kreuger.Wauconda was led by Trevor Middleton’s 45.Woodstock d. Grayslake North: At Plum Tree National Golf Club in Harvard, medalist Tyler Cundiff shot a 41 to lead the Blue Streaks (177) to victory over the Knights (185).Sam Stanfel carded a 43 for Grayslake North.

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    Bears running back Kahlil Bell leads the team with 28 preseason rushing attempts.

    Bears’ Bell just wants to help team

    Kahlil Bell wants to be more than just an NFL running back, and playing behind Matt Forte and Marion Barber, he will have to be. One of the factors that has allowed Bell to zip past Chester Taylor on the depth chart (unofficially, for now) is his ability to contribute on special teams.

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    Chicago White Sox's Alejandro De Aza watches his three-run home run off Minnesota Twins relief pitcher Anthony Swarzak Tuesday during the fourth inning. Paul Konerko and Alex Rios also scored on the play.

    De Aza drives in 4 as Sox top Twins 8-6

    Alejandro De Aza helped the White Sox survive a stormy few innings. The bullpen took care of the rest. De Aza drove in a career-high four runs to lead the Sox to their fifth straight win, 8-6 over the Minnesota Twins on Tuesday night.

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    Blake Biddle of St. Charles reached the sweet 16 of the U.S. Amateur tournament. Biddle, a Wheaton Academy grad, is a sophomore at the University of Nevada-Las Vegas.

    St. Charles golfer Biddle a factor at U.S. Amateur

    It’s been quite awhile since an Illinois golfer made an impact in the U.S. Amateur, but Wheaton Academy grad Blake Biddle of St. Charles ended that dryspell last week and he could be a factor in such national competitions for years to come.

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    Despite a 6-10 record, Matt Garza could be the ace of the Cubs’ pitching staff next season.

    Garza could be Cubs’ ace next year

    When all else fails, and plenty does for the Cubs, there’s always talk of the future. Cubs fans know that all too well, especially this time of year. Looking ahead to 2012, any success the Cubs have will depend on how the new general manager restocks the starting rotation and how well those pitchers perform.

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    Streaking White Sox climb out of early hole

    Starting pitcher Zach Stewart put the White Sox in a big hole Tuesday night, serving up a 3-run homer to Jason Kubel in the fourth inning.Not to worry.It looks like the Sox are finally on that streak they’ve been searching for all season, and Alejandro De Aza tied the score with a 3-run homer in the bottom of the fourth.The Twins took a 6-3 lead in the fifth, but the White Sox bailed out Stewart once again with 5 runs in the bottom of the inning.That ended the scoring, and the Sox’ 8-6 win was their fifth straight. They also kept pace with the Tigers and still trail the AL Central leaders by 5 games.“I wasn’t real happy with it,” Stewart said after allowing 6 runs on 7 hits in 4⅔ innings. “I just didn’t feel like I pitched very good and we did a great job battling back. They helped pick me up and we got a win, which is nice.”De Aza continued to excel for the White Sox, knocking in 4 runs.“I feel great,” the right fielder said. “Thank God that I’m playing. I try to just play the game and don’t do too much. Let the game dictate everything.”The bullpen also bailed out Stewart, and Will Ohman, Jason Frasor, Chris Sale and Sergio Santos combined to pitch 4⅓ scoreless innings.Sox relievers have a 1.81 ERA over the last 14 games.“You can’t say enough,” Santos said. “Everyone in our bullpen can be a closer and throw the ninth. Sale’s done a great job, (Matt) Thornton, Frasor, (Jesse) Crain, Will and even (Josh) Kinney when he comes in. We feel that’s our strong point. We take pride in our bullpen, we take pride in holding leads and sustaining leads and we’re kind of going on all cylinders now.”Dual rehabs:Catcher A.J. Pierzynski (fractured left wrist) and starting pitcher Phil Humber (facial contusion) both played for Class AAA Charlotte on Tuesday night.Pierzynski was 0-for-3. He is scheduled to be Charlotte’s designated hitter Wednesday and catch Thursday before coming off the disabled list and rejoining the White Sox on Friday in Detroit.“I felt as good as can be expected out there and I got to catch Phil,” Pierzynski said. “Everything checked out fine. Always something in there but very manageable. The training staff did a great job getting the inflammation out and getting me ready.”Humber, who was hit above the right eye by a Kosuke Fukudome line drive during an Aug. 18 start against the Indians, pitched 5 innings for Charlotte and allowed 4 runs on 7 hits while striking out five.“It went all right,” said Humber, who rejoins the Sox on Wednesday. “I gave up some runs and I’m not too happy about that. But I was trying to knock the rust off and get back in the swing of things. I felt pretty good, especially for the first two or three innings. The ball was coming out of my hand good. It’s just that everything was up and I didn’t have too much of a feel for my curveball.”Humber was hit in the back by a drive off the bat of Norfolk’s Adam Donachie in the second inning but he stayed in the game.

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    Grant, Cary-Grove net first-round wins

    Cary-Grove and Grant picked up first-round victories in boys soccer tournament play at Grant on Tuesday.

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    Conant holds off Streamwood

    Conant's boys soccer team came through with a hard-earned victory Tuesday evening, one night after a tough loss to conference rival Palatine tested the mettle of a Cougars side which is struggling in the finishing department while it battles injuries. Nathan Cornell struck the game-winner at 13 minutes to help the Cougars (2-2-1) earn a 1-0 decision over Streamwood in third-round play of the 20th annual Lancer Classic in Hoffman Estates on the Cougars’ home pitch.

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    Schaumburg is Abel to cruise

    Schaumburg and Elk Grove win Mid-Suburban League boys soccer crossovers and Christian Liberty beats Westlake Christian.

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    Alysia Baznik of Naperville Central hits the ball past Katie Canning of Downers Grove North in girls volleyball action Tuesday in Downers Grove.

    Downers Grove North catches Naperville Central

    Jessie Tulacka threw down 20 kills, and Downers Grove North rallied past Naperville Central in three sets on Tuesday in Downers Grove.

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    South Elgin’s Jordan Tuin, middle, bites her lip as she comes out of the shadows at the start of the Elgin cross country invitational Tuesday at Lords Park. She finished second overall. To her left is Amanda Patterson of Streamwood, who finished fourth, and on her right is Bartlett’s Nicole Watkins, who finished fifth overall.

    St. Charles North runs away with title at Elgin

    St. Charles North wins team title at Elgin City Meet.

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    Fenton stops losing streak

    Fenton beat Proviso West in three sets to snap its 30-match losing streak on Tuesday.

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    South Elgin’s Francisco Garcia leads the pack to the finish line during the Elgin cross country invitational Tuesday at Lords Park.

    S. Elgin’s Gonzalez wins Elgin title

    St. Charles North wins team title at Elgin City Meet.

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    Barrington first singles player Lucia Stumbras returns a volley at Buffalo Grove on Tuesday.

    Barrington finds its groove against Buffalo Grove

    As the girls tennis season commences, powerhouse tennis teams Barrington and host Buffalo Grove contended Tuesday in a Mid-Suburban League divisional crossover matchup. Barrington ultimately coasted to victory 6-1.

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    Batavia’s Cody Balogh delights in scoring his second goal of the game vs St. Charles after receiving and directing a corner kick from teammate Eduardo Cuautle into the net in the second half of the match on Tuesday, August 30.

    Batavia blows out St. Charles East

    The meaning of the first name Cody is helper. After Tuesday night’s Upstate Eight Conference River Division boys soccer clash between Batavia and St. Charles East, perhaps scorer should be added to the definition.

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    Liberty use big 4th quarter to beat Sky 71-67

    Cappie Pondexter scored 19 points, Plenette Pierson had 17 and the New York Liberty rallied from a 14-point deficit in the fourth quarter to beat the Chicago Sky 71-67 on Tuesday night. Sylvia Fowles scored 22 points and Epiphanny Prince had 15 for Chicago (14-16).

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    Boys soccer/Fox Valley roundup

    Tony Benitez made 10 saves in goal Tuesday as the Elgin boys soccer team stunned St. Charles North 3-0 in an Upstate Eight River game.Sammy Escobar, Josue Chavez and Jon Sandoval had goals for the Maroons (2-2, 1-1) and Juan Flores added an assist.Harvest Christian 5, Cornerstone Academy 1: Connor Kearns had 4 goals and Louis Pereda added one as the Lions won their first game of the season.Burlington Central 1, Byron 1: Bryce Warner scored late in the second half on an assist from Chris Gousios to give the Rockets (2-0-3) a nonconference tie. Riley Jensen had 2 saves in goal for BC.Dundee-Crown 5, CL Central 0: Tony Meza scored twice, while Carl Hagan, Malik Washington and Kyle Hagan each added a goal to lead the Chargers (2-2) to a Fox Valley crossover win. Christian Martinez had 5 saves in goal for D-C.Libertyville 3, Jacobs 2: Anthony Moscatello and Mike Mamola scored goals for Jacobs (3-2) in this nonconference loss. Nick Matysek had 7 saves in goal for the Golden Eagles.Indian Creek 2, St. Edward 1: Nicholas Semler had St. Edward’s lone goal in this nonconference loss. Matt Hesch had 7 saves in goal for the Green Wave (1-2-1).

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    Girls volleyball/Fox Valley roundup

    Harvest Christian d. Cornerstone Academy: Sydney Doby had 8 kills, 6 aces and 7 assists to lead Harvest Christian to a 25-8, 25-12 nonconference win. Sarah Kott added 4 kills for the Lions.Kaneland d. Burlington Central: Allie O’Reilly had 10 assists, 13 digs and 2 aces and Sydney Sand added 5 kills and 13 digs but the Rockets (1-2) fell to Kaneland 25-17, 25-27, 25-18 in nonconference action. Samantha Bohne had 19 digs and was 19-for-19 on serve receive for BC, while Lexi Bouza added 3 kills and Stephanie Sipinski had 9 digs.Jacobs d. Bartlett: Alyssa Ehrhardt had 7 kills, an ace, 3 assists and 2 digs and Maris Smith added 6 kills, 3 aces and 8 digs as Jacobs downed Bartlett 25-18, 25-19 in nonconference play. Nikki Madoch added 4 kills for the Golden Eagles (1-0) and Rebecca Jobst had 6 digs. Taylor Lauder added 16 assists for Jacobs. Lexie Mason had 5 kills and 5 digs for Bartlett (0-3) and Tori Burke added 12 assists.Women’s volleyballChicago State d. Judson: Chicago State, which came into the match with the longest losing streak of any NCAA Division I women’s volleyball program (94 matches) ended the streak that dated back to 2007 with a 32-30, 25-19, 25-15 win at Judson. Carissa Oelke (14 kills, 9 digs), Kristen Kohlstedt (25 assists), Taylor Lesner (12 digs) and Kyle Koon (10 digs) led Judson.

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    Harper women’s soccer team has high hopes

    After finishing ninth nationally last season, the Harper women’s soccer team is looking to improve on that finish in 2011. The Hawks, however, have undergone some big changes. Gone from last year’s squad is North Central Community College Conference MVP Jaclyn LaRocco (Schaumburg).

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    New look, high hopes for Harper men’s soccer

    This year, the Harper men's soccer team will be counting on plenty of new faces. A pair of midfielders — O’Meara (Palatine), who last played two seasons ago, and Diago Calderia, who played three years ago, will be looked upon for leadership.

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    Buffalo Grove passes up Wheaton North

    Buffalo Grove went 2 goals ahead in the opening half-hour and went on to take control against Wheaton North on Tuesday afternoon in a third-round match of the 20th annual Lancer Classic played at neutral site Conant in Hoffman Estates. The Bison won 5-0.

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    Hersey thinks quick, tops Fremd

    Abby Fesl was on her game when her Hersey girls volleyball team opened its 2011 home schedule on Tuesday night. The 5-foot-10 all-area setter delivered some perfect quick sets to 6-1 junior Erica Hill and 6-1 senior Kristen Pedersen which helped ignite the Hersey offense. And the Huskies gained the advantage on the scoreboard at the end, notching a 25-16, 25-21 triumph over Fremd in the Ken Carter Gymnasium.

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    Preseason finale last shot for some Steelers

    PITTSBURGH — There were nights when the anxiety over his chances of making the Pittsburgh Steelers would consume wide receiver Tyler Grisham.Two years into an NFL career spent entirely on the bubble, he’s used to the churning in his stomach when the end of training camp nears. Rather than run from the prospect of being cut, he’s learned to embrace it. “You come face to face with it and say, `What’s the need? What is fear going to accomplish for me?”’ Grisham said. “I’ve allowed fear and anxiety to take its course a little too much in the past and so now this year I feel like ... I’ve done a better job of shielding it a little bit and going out and playing.”Even so, Grisham knows his chances of still being on the team when the roster is trimmed to 53 this weekend are long, which makes the final preseason game on Thursday against Carolina his last best shot to turn the heads of the right people.The starters will likely be in baseball caps by the start of the second quarter. Then the real drama begins as players like Grisham try to avoid the waiver wire.It’s only their livelihood. No pressure.“If I continue to block well in the game, do better on special teams than I have in the past and if I do, I think I have a shot,” Grisham said. “But I’m trying not to think about the shot. The anxiety will come up and I’ll start head counting.”Doing the math is never a good idea, even for a player who believes he’s had the best camp of his career. Grisham has frequently drawn praise from coach Mike Tomlin, who shouted “I see you 19” more than once during the team’s open practices at Saint Vincent College earlier in the month.Still, it wasn’t enough to keep Pittsburgh from going out and signing free agent Jerricho Cotchery, meaning the top five receiver spots are locked up. A sixth spot — if it even exists — will likely come down to Grisham and Arnaz Battle and Battle is considered a special teams ace.Can he make the team? He wouldn’t be here if he didn’t think he could. Will he? That’s another story.“It is tough,” Grisham said. “It’s a daily struggle, a daily test.”Running back Jonathan Dwyer has another phrase for what it’s like to feel like your job is constantly on the line.“Every day is an interview, not just the game,” Dwyer said. “Even today in practice, you’ve got to make an impression on these coaches that they can trust you so they can depend on you when the game is on the line.”Dwyer leads the team in rushing during the preseason, though he’s needed 24 carries to gain 82 yards. He’s trying not to read too much into the workload, even if his main competition for the fourth running back spot, former Wisconsin star John Clay, has carried it just eight times.“It’s not how many reps they get,” Dwyer said, “it’s about what you do with those reps, how you execute.”Clay is hoping the opportunities even out a little bit on Thursday. The last month has been a strange one for the former All Big Ten selection, who went undrafted after leaving the Badgers a year early. The last time he was healthy, but not playing, was during his freshman year with the Badgers.Back then, however, he knew the team had a vested interest in his development after signing him to a scholarship. There are no such promises in the NFL, and Clay knows Thursday’s game could be the last time he’s on a football field for awhile.“I’m just climbing up the ladder, proving myself to everybody,” Clay said. “The coaches have to know they can count on me.”What would put Clay or any of the other players fighting for the last handful of spots over the top? Nobody knows. Is Clay one 50-yard burst away from leapfrogging Dwyer? Is Grisham one big third-down grab from making the final 53? Nobody knows.

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    Chargers release veteran long snapper Binn

    SAN DIEGO — After accurately snapping the ball to San Diego Chargers plackekickers and punters since 1994, time finally ran out on seemingly ageless David Binn.The Chargers decided Tuesday to release the 39-year-old Binn, the only player left from both their 1994 Super Bowl team and Bobby Beathard’s tenure as general manager.Coach Norv Turner said Binn’s release was due to a combination of Mike Windt having an outstanding camp and questions about Binn’s durability.Still, it was a shock for kicker Nate Kaeding and punter Mike Scifres to hear that the low-key Binn was finished with the Bolts.“It hurts on a personal level more than anything,” Kaeding said. “Obviously not being able to have him and the quality of his snaps around is going to be tough, but not having your friend around, too, is a hard thing. Mike and I have created pretty tight bonds over the years and it’s going to be different not having Dave around for sure.”Scifres said it was “shocking” to hear that Binn was gone. This would have been the 18th NFL season for the long snapper.“I couldn’t ask for a better teammate, a better snapper to punt behind,” Scifres said. “Not only how good of a snapper he is, but what he brought other than just the snapping, the knowledge of the game, kicking and punting. It helped out Nate and I both, tremendously. As tough as it is, I gained a great friend out of it. He had a great career, 18 years. I don’t know how many guys you’re going to find who played that long with one team.“What he did was unbelievable. He was the best.”Binn is San Diego’s all-time leader in games played with 256, not counting 12 in the postseason. Binn injured a hamstring in the 2010 season opener at Kansas City and missed the rest of the year, ending his team-record streak of 179 consecutive games played.Kaeding and Scifres said Binn was a perfectionist at delivering them the ball with the laces in the right place.“He came out every day with a purpose,” Scifres said. While kickers and punters have a reputation for mostly standing around during practice, “Dave was always snapping. Snap, snap, snap,” Scifres said. “You almost had to tell him to stop at times. He wanted to be the best, and he was. Every field goal snap, a guy could close his eyes and you’d guarantee the laces would be straight out, and on punt snaps, he was going to hit the spot every time. That’s all you can ask for.”Said Kaeding: “It’s different. It’s awkward to be here and have him not be here.”Binn wasn’t available for comment. Kaeding said he wouldn’t be surprised if Binn kept playing somewhere.Beathard signed Binn as a rookie free agent in 1994 out of California. The Chargers made it to their only Super Bowl that season, losing 49-26 to the San Francisco 49ers. Beathard retired in 2000.Windt was the fifth long snapper used by the Chargers last year.“David set the standard for everything,” Windt said. “I hope to live up to the standard.”

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    RB Gore: Agent felt good about meeting with 49ers

    SANTA CLARA, Calif. — Frank Gore’s agent is gone after what he considered a productive, all-day meeting Monday with the 49ers about a new contract for the two-time Pro Bowl running back.Gore would not say Tuesday whether an initial proposal was made, only that he has instructed agent Drew Rosenhaus to let him know when there is what he considers a “fair” offer on the table. That hadn’t happened yet to Gore’s knowledge.“Positive that they met face to face,” Gore said. “Drew felt good about everything, (about) the talk. Now, we haven’t made a decision. We haven’t gotten that done yet. We’ll see where they’re at. We’ll see where we’re at and hopefully we can get something done before the season.”The 28-year-old Gore, third on San Francisco’s career rushing list heading into his seventh NFL season, has said he hopes for a new long-term deal before the Sept. 11 season opener against Seattle.Rosenhaus’ office said it had no comment, and Rosenhaus didn’t immediately return an email from The Associated Press.Both sides have been throwing around plenty of praise for the other party. 49ers team President Jed York and general manager Trent Baalke have said they want Gore to be a “49er for life.”Gore said he even spoke to Baalke about working for the organization when he’s done playing.“I told Drew, man, just call me when he feels right, when he feels what’s fair for both sides,” Gore said. “Hopefully I can be a Niner. I want to be here for my whole career. Our GM said he wanted me here for my whole career. Hopefully my side, their side can get it done.”While new coach Jim Harbaugh said he wouldn’t address Gore’s unsettled contract situation, he did say he remains optimistic the sides will come to an agreement soon.“I’m very optimistic because Frank’s a says-what-he-means, means-what-he-says guy,” Harbaugh said. “Our organization is the same exact way. Like we’ve said, we’ll deal with this man to man with Frank and with his agent, Drew, but Frank is a great guy. Frank is a true 49er. I’ve said that from when I first got here. That’s how I thought I would feel about Frank Gore. Now, I know how I feel about Frank Gore. The guy is awesome. Somebody should do a movie. Somebody should do the Frank Gore story, because it’s an awesome story.”Gore didn’t play in last Saturday’s 30-7 loss to the Houston Texans, and Harbaugh wouldn’t say whether he would play in Thursday night’s exhibition finale at San Diego. It’s nothing new for him to sit, as Gore has rarely played during the preseason in the past.Gore, who missed the final five games last season with a broken right hip, held out for the first four days of training camp but has been his energetic, focused self on the field ever since.There have been no signs of his 2010 injury, either. Gore hurt the hip in a Monday night game at Arizona on Nov. 29.“I haven’t noticed any lack of focus,” quarterback Alex Smith said. “He’s all in. He’s here. He’s been a part of everything. Jumped in full go, so I’m not really thinking or paying attention to any of that other stuff.”Gore would like a contract comparable to the $43 million, five-year deal running back DeAngelo Williams — 20 days older than San Francisco’s star — recently received from the Carolina Panthers. That includes $21 million guaranteed. Williams missed the final 10 games last year with a sprained right foot.Gore needs 931 yards to become the franchise’s all-time leading rusher. While that is a goal, he also wants to have a big year to help turn the 49ers around after eight straight seasons without a playoff berth or winning record.He ran for 853 yards and three touchdowns last year before getting hurt in his sixth NFL season. Gore also caught 46 passes for 452 yards and two TDs. His 24 100-yard rushing games are the most in 49ers history.The 49ers rewarded two other key players with long-term contracts last year.

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    Power back for Pats, not for most of Foxborough

    FOXBOROUGH, Mass. — While most of Foxborough remained without power on Tuesday from Tropical Storm Irene, service was back at Gillette Stadium, where the New England Patriots’ final exhibition game is scheduled for Thursday night.A power company spokewoman said it was “absolutely not” true the team received special treatment.The club had internal discussions about how to handle the game against the New York Giants if power was not restored, but no decision was made before the lights went back on.“We thought we might have to go down to the new MetLife Stadium (the Giants’ home) to play the game there,” Patriots owner Robert Kraft said Tuesday. “We know it’s a serious situation. I think there are over 700,000 homes in Massachusetts that still don’t have power.”As of late Tuesday afternoon, 7,287 of 7,820 customers in Foxborough still had no power because of damage from Sunday’s storm, according to National Grid, the company that serves the town.It hopes to begin restoring power to parts of Foxborough on Wednesday with most customers back in service by Friday, National Grid spokeswoman Jackie Barry said.She said the company received many calls from town residents who felt the Patriots were given priority.“Customers in Foxborough and a lot of other customers are understandably upset,” she said. “We know this is extremely unpleasant.”The stadium and its surrounding area were back in service because one of the substations that serves them, in the adjacent town of Wrentham, was not as badly damaged as the other one in Foxborough, Barry said.The Patriots paid for expansion of the Wrentham substation after a power outage just before halftime of their 20-6 win over the Jacksonville Jaguars in the 1996 AFC championship game, said James Nolan, senior vice president of operations, administration and finance for the stadium and the Patriots.“This would guarantee that we would still have power if the feed was lost from one of the substations,” he said.The Foxborough substation serves most of the rest of the town, which has no backup substation.Three generators returned power to part of the stadium by 5 p.m. Monday, and by 8:30 p.m., power was restored from the Wrentham substation, Nolan said.Earlier in the day, the team went to another site to prepare for Thursday night’s game.“We were able to get through film yesterday,” coach Bill Belichick said Tuesday. “(We’re) trying to get back organized here at the stadium today.”The Giants have just two days between Monday night’s 17-3 loss to the New York Jets, pushed back two days because of the storm, and Thursday’s game.Kraft said he understands that people without power are upset “because I didn’t have power in my house (in Brookline) and I was here (Monday) when nothing worked and there was no air conditioning and no lights and it was very difficult. But I don’t run the power company.“So I try to talk about things I have some understanding of. We did bring in generators from our other businesses and now that power is up we’ve offered those generators to the community.”The Patriots made it home early Sunday from Detroit, where they lost to the Lions 34-10 on Saturday night, before the storm hit New England. The Patriots dominated their first two exhibition games, but Kraft knows preseason results don’t matter much.“Believe me, I can understand how people wouldn’t have been happy with the effort the other night,” he said. “I know I wasn’t (happy) on every part of the game, but the same kind of game- planning doesn’t go on to attack teams’ weaknesses. It’s a more fluid situation. So I think we’ll know better come Sept. 12 (the season opener at the Miami Dolphins) what kind of team we’ll watch the first three, four weeks of games.”

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    Saints cut DE Brown among others, sign Kasay

    METAIRIE, La. — A day after attending a back-to-school event like a typical 41-year-old father of four, John Kasay was on a morning flight from Charlotte to New Orleans and resuming is two-decade career as an NFL kicker.“That’s how fast life changes,” said Kasay, who joined the Saints in time to practice Tuesday evening, two days after Garrett Hartley hurt his right hip while kicking an extra point in New Orleans’ victory at Oakland on Sunday night. As suddenly as Kasay found himself back in the pros, former Saints starting defensive end Alex Brown was looking for a job.Brown, who has played nine NFL seasons and started every game for New Orleans in 2010, was among 11 players let go by the Saints on Tuesday, when NFL teams were required to trim preseason rosters to 80.Brown was slated to earn $3 million in base salary this season and the Saints had added depth at his position in the offseason, drafting California standout end Cam Jordan 24th overall last spring, then signing former Detroit defensive end Turk McBride shortly after the NFL lockout ended.“It was a hard decision. We spent a lot of time on it,” Saints coach Sean Payton said. “It wasn’t that we just drafted a young player at that position. I think you try to factor in all the practice snaps, all the game film and it was something that, after going through it all and also looking at the timing of it, there’s still that opportunity within the next week that he’ll have a chance to sign with someone else.“Also, that door’s not totally shut if that opportunity presents itself here,” Payton added.That opportunity could present itself for a couple of reasons, one being that Will Smith might have to serve a four-game suspension because he was among several players who tested positive for a banned diuretic in 2008. The NFL has not yet announced when or if it will impose the punishment for those players, which has been delayed by legal proceedings.Payton, however, said the Saints tried not to allow uncertainty surrounding Smith to figure into their evaluation of Brown.“We really tried not to because then we’d be making a decision predicated on a possible or not possible suspension,” Payton said. “I would say to you honestly that that didn’t come into play, because if it had come into play more, then we might have gone in a different direction.”As a rookie out of Florida, Brown started nine games for Chicago in 2002 and has remained a full-time starter for most of his career, including for all 48 regular season games since 2008.Last season he had 39 tackles and two sacks. Now the question is who will start in his place. “We’re going to have to look closely at our rotation,” Payton said. “Obviously we’re going to substitute a handful of guys in there.”McBride took first-team snaps on Tuesday, while Jordan sat out practice. Payton said Jordan’s absence was “injury-related” but declined to elaborate. Smith also did not practice, but was excused because of a death in the family, Payton said.McBride started eight games for the Lions last season. He said he did not necessarily see himself as a starter now that Brown was gone.“That’s not my job to start thinking about that. My job is to come on this turf and go as hard as I can,” McBride said. “I still have to go out there and prove myself.”Meanwhile, Payton declined to say how long Hartley would be out, and Kasay said he considers his employment with the Saints as “day to day.”He’s expected to kick on Thursday night when the Saints host Tennessee in their preseason finale.Payton said the Saints were comfortable signing Kasay because they had an opportunity to see him make clutch kicks firsthand when he was with NFC South rival Carolina. Kasay hit a 52-yard winning field goal in the final seconds in the Superdome in 2007 and a 42-yard winner in the dome, again in the final seconds, in 2008.

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    Line woes for Seahawks; TE Carlson needs surgery

    RENTON, Wash. — John Carlson was already being challenged to earn his spot back in Seattle’s plans when the Seahawks signed Pro Bowl tight end Zach Miller. Now Carlson won’t even get the chance. Seattle coach Pete Carroll announced Tuesday that Carlson would need shoulder surgery to repair a torn labrum and will miss the entire 2011 season. Carlson had missed the past two weeks of training camp after injuring his shoulder. Carroll gave no timeline for when the surgery would take place or how long Carlson would be out, but it comes as Carlson was entering the final year of his contract with the Seahawks. “We were so excited about having Zach (Miller) and John play together, you know, and unfortunately that’s not going to happen now,” Carroll said. “It’s disappointing because John’s had a great start to camp. He was rocking and rolling and those two guys out there together looked really good.” Carlson’s need for surgery will likely open a roster spot for either Dominique Byrd or Anthony McCoy, with last year’s surprising standout, Cameron Morrah, likely beginning the season on the physically unable to perform list.Seattle planned on using two tight end sets with Miller and Carlson as the main options. Carlson was coming off a disappointing third season when he caught 31 passes and only one touchdown. Carlson did catch a pair of touchdowns in Seattle’s playoff upset of New Orleans, but was carted off the field a week later in Chicago after suffering a serious concussion. “Anthony (McCoy) has done a very good job and Dominique Byrd has done extremely well in catching the football and getting open,” Carroll said. “We’re certainly going to miss John. We were really counting on him having a fantastic year for us.” While Carlson is a significant injury, the tight end position is one of the deepest on Seattle’s roster. The same can’t be said for Seattle’s rebuilt offensive line that’s been the biggest concern for the Seahawks through the preseason. Rookie James Carpenter was exposed in last Saturday’s loss in Denver, but offensive line coach Tom Cable believes Friday’s exhibition finale against Oakland is about Seattle’s entire line and not just his rookie right tackle. “It’s an ultimatum for the group because you don’t have any more practice games, you don’t have any more do-overs,” Cable said on Tuesday. “That’s been our approach this week is just to go back to work. We don’t panic.”Seattle’s offensive line slogged through its first two games struggling to give new quarterback Tarvaris Jackson any time to throw. But those struggles were amplified against Denver and the pass rushing duo of Elvis Dumervil and Von Miller. Carpenter got picked on the most as he struggled moving laterally to pick up the quick pass rushers. Cable said Seattle had kept much of its game-plan basic in order to see what it’s young and inexperienced line could do without much help. But it became obvious something will need to be done on the right side, whether it’s giving Carpenter more help or perhaps making a change. Breno Giacomini spent some time playing with the starters in Denver in place of Carpenter and the duo split some time again on Tuesday. “Giacomini has done a nice job. He’s put together a really good preseason. He’s been very solid. He hasn’t played against all the same guys all the time, but he has had a very solid preseason. He’s been around a little bit more. We want to make sure that he has the opportunity to show and see if he can help us. So we give him some opportunities with the first group.” Carroll also confirmed the team hosted former Dallas center Andre Gurode for a visit on Tuesday, but didn’t expand on if or how Gurode could fit in. Seattle is going mostly young, with its intended starting line featuring two rookies, second-year tackle Russell Okung, third-year center Max Unger and veteran Robert Gallery.

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    Eli Manning not worried about poor preseason

    EAST RUTHERFORD, N.J. — Eli Manning sees his dismal preseason statistics and isn’t concerned.Preseason is a time to get used to standing in the pocket, to get adjusted to new teammates and to take a hit or two. And that’s just what the New York Giants quarterback says he has done in the first three preseason games.Manning has not had a ton of success playing behind a revamped offensive line, and without departed wide receiver Steve Smith and tight end Kevin Boss. He has completed just over 49 percent of his passes, has not thrown a touchdown and tossed two interceptions. The offense has scored 16 points with him at the controls.Certainly not Tom Brady-type stats, but Manning is certain things will change once the regular season starts on Sept. 11 at Washington.“We’re ready,” Manning said. “You know, I’ve never put too much on preseason. Obviously you want to go out there and perform well and move the ball and score touchdowns. That makes you feel good. But I wouldn’t rely just on what happens in preseason and what’s going to happen in the regular season. We put a lot of effort into the regular season on our preparation to put us in the right situations and studying defenses. In preseason, not as much is done.”Manning believes the offense will spend the next week getting things straightened out.Coach Tom Coughlin refused to say whether Manning and the first team will see action in the preseason finale against New England on Thursday, but if they do they will not play much.“When you get to this point I think the most important point is going into the season healthy,” Manning said. “Our offense is healthy right now. You don’t want to rush anything, put guys in a situation where they’re playing on short notice for a series or two. Whatever he decides, we’ll agree with and do our job. We’re preparing and getting ready.”Manning said it’s easy to be fooled by preseason statistics. Unlike the preseason, there is little game planning and he admitted he does not take chances in meaningless games.“It’s preseason, you try to stay injury free,” Manning said. “You try not to take extra hits. You try to say: `Hey, we got a bad play, I’m not going to try to sit around here, try to wait for something to come up and wait for something maybe to get open.’ Hey, you hit your check down, you go on. There’s a little bit of that.”Manning said the Giants did a lot of good things in their 17-3 loss to the Jets on Monday night. They moved the ball, but failed to convert when they got into position.“No one’s going to ever remember what your preseason numbers are,” he said. “It’s about learning, it’s about seeing things, getting used to taking a hit, getting used to having a live rush move into the pocket, seeing things, making adjustments, playing against a new team. That’s why it’s preseason, it’s just preparation for the regular season.”Giants coach Tom Coughlin said that one of Manning’s interceptions against the Jets resulted because a receiver failed to make the proper adjustment on a blitz.“You have to be where you are supposed to be at the exact time and proper depth,” Coughlin said. “You have to be able to react to the world around you to make the proper adjustments.”Manning took some of the blame for the failure of the receiver to adjust, saying he probably should have thrown the ball into the ground when he noticed his receiver out of position.Veteran linebacker Michael Boley wasn’t concerned about Manning.“It is the preseason and they are still working on things like we are still working on things on the defensive side of the ball,” Boley said. “Those are things and reasons why we use this time wisely to focus on those things. I have the utmost confidence in Eli so whenever this regular season starts, he will be clicking on all cylinders.”

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    Larkin goes the distance, edges Elgin

    The girls from Larkin and Elgin battled to the final point in a tense, 3-game volleyball match at Chesbrough Field House Tuesday, but the moment of truth in visiting Larkin’s come-from-behind 23-25, 25-11, 26-24 victory may have come during a timeout early in the third game, according to coach Marcin Dybka.

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    Bears wide receiver Roy Williams has a certain swagger about him, looking the part of a special athlete.

    Bears’ Williams draws comparisons to Bulls’ Boozer

    For better or worse, Bears' new wide receiver Roy Williams reminds of another local athlete. But who could that be?

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    South Elgin’s Jordan Tuin, middle, bites her lip as she comes out of the shadows at the start of the Elgin cross country invitational Tuesday at Lords Park. She finished second overall. To her left is Amanda Patterson of Streamwood, who finished fourth, and on her right is Bartlett’s Nicole Watkins, who finished fifth overall.

    South Elgin’s Tuin 2nd at Elgin Invite

    South Elgin’s Jordan Tuin finished second Tuesday in the Elgin City Invitational girls cross country meet, finishing in a time of 19:10.4 behind St. Charles North’s Sydney Stuenkel (18:39.7).

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    South Elgin’s Francisco Garcia leads the pack to the finish line during the Elgin cross country invitational Tuesday at Lords Park.

    S. Elgin’s Gonzalez wins Elgin title

    South Elgin senior Francisco Gonzalez said he did not expect to win the Elgin City Cross Country Invitational on Tuesday. In most teams’ first meet of the season, Gonzalez ran the 3-mile course at Lords Park in 16:05.5 to beat Bartlett’s Joey Salatino by 5.2 seconds.

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    Illinois head coach Ron Zook expects the Illini to use four running backs in its season opener Saturday at home against Arkansa State.

    Huskies, Illini hope volume makes up for lack of star power

    Illinois and Northern Illinois ranked among the nation's finest rushing attacks in 2010, which helped them to set single-season school records for scoring. Will the Illini and Huskies be able to run the ball as well in 2011?

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    Philadelphia Eagles quarterback Michael Vick smiles Tuesday during a news conference about his new contract.

    Recharged and now rich, QB Vick ready for pressure

    PHILADELPHIA — Michael Vick shared some laughs, and offered up an occasional smile. But for the most part, his Tuesday press conference announcing his new contract was handled the same way he's handled everything since he landed in Philadelphia two years ago.All business."The common goal is to bring that ring back to the city of Philadelphia. That's why we play," Vick said. "That's what we're all working for. As a competitor, I don't feel my career will be complete without that."And so begins the next phase in one of the league's more remarkable comeback stories. With the business of his new, six-year, $100 million contract out of the way, it's time for Vick and the rest of the star-laden Eagles to shoot for that elusive Super Bowl title.The Eagles won the 1960 NFL championship, but have been to just two Super Bowls since, losing both.Not that there's any pressure or anything."It's a lot of money, how ever you look at it," Vick said. "Obviously, it's going to create a lot of demands. I know what comes along with it, and I know how to handle it."Vick, 31, became the Eagles' backup quarterback when they traded Donovan McNabb to the Washington Redskins after the 2009 season, and he became the starter last September after replacing an injured Kevin Kolb.He was named NFL Comeback Player of the Year in 2010 after winning eight of 11 starts, throwing a career-high 21 touchdown passes and rushing for nine more. But despite engineering a memorable 38-31 comeback win over the New York Giants that ultimately led to the NFC East title in December, Vick and the Eagles were dumped at home a month later in the playoffs by the Green Bay Packers, 21-16, in the wild-card round.But this year, knowing he'll open the season as the starter, and knowing he has perhaps the most name-heavy roster in the league on his side, it appears like it's Super Bowl or bust.Which is why coach Andy Reid and Co. are more than happy to see the quarterback happy."This is a great story all the way through," Reid said. "This is really what America's all about. Second chance and Mike took full advantage of that. And then when he was given a second chance to start in the National Football League, he took full advantage of that and turned it into this."And the next stop — after a detour vs. the New York Jets in the preseason finale on Thursday — will be a week from Sunday in St. Louis, where Vick will make his first opening-day start in five years vs. the Rams."(I) go back in time and think about how hard it's been over the last two years," he said. "But (despite) the sacrifices I had to make and what I had to give up, it's been all worth it."But, in the end, will he be worth the money? The Eagles retained his rights by signing him to a one-year, $16 million franchise tag in the offseason, but his new contract now runs through 2016. It's a bold statement for a franchise that has had its share of big-name quarterbacks in the past, only to walk away empty handed.It's clear, though, they see something different this time around."I think it's really a tribute to him more than us," Reid said, "and how he's come back and the effort that he's put forth."Eagles president Joe Banner concurs."When you give a player a contract, you're betting on the future, and you're using the evidence of what he's done to that point to evaluate your future projection," he said. "And if we didn't think Michael was somebody capable of leading this team to a Super Bowl, we never would have given him that contract."Now, our judgment has to be right, and he has to get on the field and prove that. But we wouldn't be making this type of investment if we didn't view him that way."

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    The Big Ten's hectic offseason drew as many headlines as its teams did on the field last year. Now, with the additions of Nebraska — and coach Bo Pelini — two divisions, a title game and four new coaches, football starts again beginning Thursday in Madison, Wis.

    New Big Ten features Nebraska, 4 fresh coaches

    The bigger Big Ten is ready to go. After talking about the move for more than a year, the biggest addition — No. 10 Nebraska — will begin its season Saturday and all 12 conference members are in action this week.

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    Bears rookie WR Dane Sanzenbacher has 6 receptions this preseason for 57 yards.

    Bears WR Sanzenbacher has one more chance to impress

    Undrafted rookie wide receiver Dane Sanzenbacher has made all the right moves in his quest to make the 53-man roster. But it's possible he's still on the bubble and that his fate won't be decided until after Thursday night's preseason finale.

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    Miami quarterback Jacory Harris is one of eight Hurricanes players that must sit out games and repay benefits in order to play for the Hurricanes again.

    NCAA: 8 Miami players must sit out games

    Quarterback Jacory Harris and 11 other Miami players who accepted extra benefits from former booster Nevin Shapiro will be allowed by the NCAA to play again, four of them without missing any games.

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    Caroline Wozniacki watches a ball hit by Nuria Llagostera Vives of Spain during the first round Tuesday of the U.S. Open tennis tournament in New York.

    Wozniacki saves the intrigue for later

    NEW YORK — It’s funny what questions some people will and won’t answer.Take the world’s top-ranked tennis player, Caroline Wozniacki.Her boyfriend? Sure, she’s been seeing Rory McIlory of late.Her new coach? Well, that, Wozniacki insists, must remain a mystery.Wozniacki opened her latest quest for her first Grand Slam title with a 6-3, 6-1 victory over Nuria Llagostera Vives of Spain on Tuesday. It was a drama-free match in Arthur Ashe Stadium that left the most interesting stuff for the post-match interview.How were things going with McIlroy, golf’s reigning U.S. Open champion whom she started dating this summer?“You know, he has something I’m looking for and I have something he’s looking for,” she said. “He wants to be No. 1. So it’s good to have something on each other.”Does the No. 1 ranking, when it’s not accompanied by a major title, feel like a burden or an honor? “I’m trying to stay up there as long as possible, and it doesn’t really matter what people are saying,” she said. “No one can ever take that away from me.”And why not end the suspense and tell us who that new coach of yours is?“Yeah, well, I have to respect him, as well,” she said. “So if he wants to be in the background and not have his name out, I have to respect that.”Though she’s refusing to name names, Wozniacki is clearly looking for another gear and a few more weapons as she tries to add to a resume that includes 46 of the last 47 weeks at No. 1 but no major championships and only one trip to a Grand Slam final — two years ago at the U.S. Open, when she lost to Kim Clijsters.She had what some viewed as a rough summer, losing her first match at both Toronto and Cincinnati — considered key leadups to the year’s last Grand Slam. But last week, she won for the fourth straight year at New Haven, and suddenly, the critics seem more like alarmists.“I know that I’m back on track,” she said. “I know that everyone has to write their stories, but I think we should move on. Ask me about something else, something more interesting.”There wasn’t much interesting about this match, except maybe for the observation that Wozniacki didn’t need to bring out any new weapons to defeat Llagostera Vives, the diminutive counterpuncher ranked 125th and playing her first singles match on the U.S. Open show court.This was typical Wozniacki — steady groundstrokes and long points, made longer on a surface that players say has been playing slower this year.A number of the ex-players who now work as analysts on TV say Wozniacki’s kind of game isn’t suited to winning Grand Slams, especially not the kind of grind that the U.S. Open can be.Wozniacki isn’t listening.“They can say what they want,” she said. “I’m the type of player I am. I’ve won a lot of tournaments. I’m No. 1 in the world, and of course I can still improve. There are a lot of things to my game I can still improve, but everyone can.”Elsewhere on the second day at the U.S. Open, No. 4 seed Victoria Azarenka defeated Johanna Larsson of Sweden 6-1, 6-3. She reached her first Grand Slam semi earlier this year at Wimbledon and is another good candidate to win in a wide-open women’s field.“I always take it match by match,” she said. “But I have been closer to my goals, so I can only look and stay positive and keep getting better.”Serena Williams, seeded 28th but always considered a main threat, had a night match scheduled for Tuesday, as did defending men’s champion Rafael Nadal. Top-seeded Novak Djokovic started his first-round match shortly after Wozniacki got off the court.In earlier men’s action, Ernests Gulbis of Latvia upset 16th-seeded Mikhail Youzhny of Russia, who made a surprise trip to the semifinals last year before falling to Nadal.Other winners included No. 5 David Ferrer, No. 11 Jo-Wilfried Tsonga, No. 17 Jurgen Melzer and American wildcard Donald Young. No. 20 Yanina Wickmayer, No. 31 Kaia Kanepi and No. 11 Jelena Jankovic won on the women’s side.

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    Notre Dame head coach Brian Kelly

    Irish coach Kelly ready for 2nd season to start

    Brian Kelly's play-calling from the sidelines could be expanded this season, starting with Notre Dame's season-opener against South Florida on Saturday.

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    Purdue head coach Danny Hope opens this season under scrutiny after two losing seasons.

    Purdue coach Hope needs wins

    If Purdue coach Danny Hope is on the hot seat, he won't admit it.

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    Images from St. Edward vs. Genoa-Kingston football at Greg True Field in Elgin on Friday, Aug. 26, 2011.

    Images: St. Edward vs. Genoa-Kingston football
    The Green Wave of St. Edward played The Cogs of Genoa-Kingston at Greg True Field in Elgin on Friday, Aug. 26. The Green Wave won 21-0.

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    Jonathan Spector of the United States, top, already has 36 caps with the national team at age 25. The Arlington Heights native was called up again this week. (AP Photo/Bas Czerwinski)

    U.S. soccer team call surprises, excites Spector

    When his contract with English Premier League side West Ham ran out, Arlington Heights native Jonathan Spector surprised many when he signed with Birmingham City in England. Now he's playing regularly again in a new position and is back with the U.S. national team.

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    William McGirt hits his tee shot on the first hole Friday during the second round of The Barclays golf tournament.

    Golfer McGirt still hopeful, happy to be playing

    For a guy who grew up in the South, the happiest times for William McGirt are coming to Boston.

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    Pearl takes job as VP for Knoxville company

    KNOXVILLE, Tenn. — Former Tennessee basketball coach Bruce Pearl has taken a job with a Knoxville-based wholesale grocery company as a vice president of marketing.Pearl had also been considering an offer to coach the Texas Legends of the NBA’s developmental league but says in a statement released Tuesday that he feels Knoxville is home for him and his family.He will begin working at H.T. Hackney on Thursday. The company is led by Chairman and CEO Bill Sansom, a former University of Tennessee trustee.Pearl was fired from Tennessee in March in the wake of a two-year NCAA investigation that culminated Wednesday with a three-year show-cause penalty against the coach.

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    Stanley Cup dented after tumble in Newfoundland

    ST. JOHN’S, Newfoundland — The Stanley Cup is sporting a new dent after toppling from a table in Newfoundland.The silver trophy was being readied for a helicopter flight from St. John’s to Bonavista, the hometown of former Boston Bruin Michael Ryder, when it fell over.Officials quickly righted the cup during the welcoming ceremony.Ryder recently signed a two-year contract with the Dallas Stars. He is the second Newfoundlander to bring the Stanley Cup to the province.Detroit’s Dan Cleary did in 2008 after the Red Wings defeated Pittsburgh in the final series.

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    Suspended Illini LB Williams back with scout team

    CHAMPAIGN — Illinois coach Ron Zook says junior linebacker Ashante Williams has started practicing with the scout team after he was charged with drunken driving and suspended from the team.Zook said Tuesday he isn’t sure whether Williams will rejoin the first team. The coach says he has no time in mind to make that decision. Zook says he wanted to keep Williams with the team in some fashion as he nears graduation.Williams was arrested in Urbana in July and charged with two counts of drunken driving. Court officials say the Mayfield, Ohio, native has not entered a plea. He is due in court Sept. 8.Williams played in all 13 games last season and was expected to play a lot this fall. Illinois opens the season Saturday against Arkansas State.

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    Ohio State plans for widespread compliance program

    COLUMBUS, Ohio — Ohio State’s top financial official on Tuesday recommended the university hire two firms to undertake a comprehensive review of campus compliance programs in the wake of the football team’s memorabilia scandal.The review will look at compliance across the university, including academics, medical operations, research, finances and athletics.Two firms, both outside Ohio, are being recommended by Geoff Chatas, the university’s chief financial officer.The first, Protiviti Inc. of Menlo Park, Calif., is a global business and risk consulting firm that fit the university’s needs for a compliance review, Chatas said. The second, New York-based law firm Dewey and LeBoeuf, will assist with legal issues arising from the review, Chatas said.Chatas said he’s not aware of a similar compliance review of this size nationally. Trustees are likely to approve the hiring next week.The review comes as Ohio State tries to recover from a rules scandal that cost former coach Jim Tressel his job and led to the departure of quarterback Terrelle Pryor.The review is about much more than the athletics department, said trustee Robert Schottenstein, chairman of the trustees’ audit committee.“We’ve also underscored we believe this was an opportunity for Ohio State to take a step forward in an area where historically maybe that wasn’t important, or wasn’t an issue,” Schottenstein, CEO and president of M/I Homes Inc., said Tuesday.Trustees announced in June the university would review all compliance practices, not just those in the athletic department.The university is still waiting the results of the NCAA investigation into the scandal, which started with players improperly trading football memorabilia for discounted tattoos and cash in violation of university and NCAA rules. Later, it was learned that Tressel knew of the violations but failed to report them as required by his contract.

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    Fire scouting report
    Chicago Fire scout

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    St. Charles East’s Kadie Brooks, Erienne Barry and Maisey Mulvey celebrate a point early in the first game against Benet Academy Tuesday.

    Images: Daily Herald prep photos of the week
    This week's Prep Photos of the Week gallery includes the best high school sports photos by Daily Herald photographers featuring football, golf, cross country and volleyball.

Business

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    The Daily Herald will be available on the iPad, iPhone and your computer, or all of them, depending on which subscription you purchase. If you subscribe to the newspaper that goes to your home, you can get all the rest for $1 more a week.

    Daily Herald to charge for online subscriptions

    The Daily Herald will become the first newspaper in the Chicago area to charge regularly for digital access, the company is announcing today in letters to its readers.

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    Wheaton company adds marketing to the mix

    Wheaton-based Bold Steps Inc. announced that it acquired RDP Marketing & Events Inc.The acquisition provides Bold Steps clients with a comprehensive and integrated set of services typically producing business plans, marketing plans and operational plans.

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    Stocks rise on promise of more stimulus

    The mere discussion of more economic stimulus from the Federal Reserve was enough to send stocks higher Tuesday. The Dow Jones industrial average rose 20 points, its third day of gains.

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    A young shopper peers into a box as he waits to get through the check-out at a California. A private research group said Tuesday that consumer confidence in the economy in August dropped almost 15 points to the lowest level since April 2009 . $PHOTOCREDIT_ON$ $PHOTOCREDIT_OFF$

    Consumers have the prices-just-keep rising blues

    NEW YORK — Shoppers dig deeper into ever emptying pockets to pay higher prices for basics like food and clothing. Retailers raise prices trying to stay afloat against higher costs for materials and labor. The result isn’t cheering us up any.Consumers’ confidence in August dropped almost 15 points to the lowest level since April 2009 as worries about the economy fueled the wildest stock market swings since the financial meltdown in 2008.At a time when Americans are increasingly worried about a weak job market, higher costs for food and clothing and recent stock market turmoil, the falling confidence numbers raise new concerns about their willingness to spend and jumpstart the economy. That’s particularly important since consumer spending accounts for 70 percent of U.S. economic activity.“Consumer confidence deteriorated sharply in August, as consumers grew significantly more pessimistic about the short-term outlook,” said Lynn Franco, director of The Conference Board Consumer Research Center in a statement.The Conference Board said Tuesday that its Consumer Confidence Index fell to 44.5, down from a revised 59.2 in July. The number was the lowest level since April 2009 when the reading was 40.8. It also is far below the 53.3 that analysts had expected. A reading above 90 indicates the economy is on solid footing; above 100 signals strong growth. A number of factors contributed to the index’s decline. The index, which is based on a random survey of consumers sent to 5,000 households from Aug. 1 to Aug. 18, captured the wildest week on Wall Street since the financial crisis in 2008.Four days into the survey period, on Aug. 5, S&P downgraded the U.S. federal debt and concern revived about the health of European banks. Following that, The Dow Jones industrial average had four consecutive days of 400-point swings for the first time in its 115-year history during the week that ended Aug. 12. Besides debt talks and market fluctuations, Americans are still plagued by old economic worries. The nation’s unemployment rate is stuck at 9 percent. Home values remain weak. And shoppers are facing rising costs for everything from food to clothing as retailers try to offset their higher costs for labor and materials.As a result, one gauge of the index that measures how shoppers feel about the economy dropped to 33.3 from 35.7. Another measure that assesses shoppers’ outlook over the next six months fell to 51.9, down from 74.9 last month.Consumers’ views on jobs, in particular, have become more pessimistic. Those claiming that jobs are “hard to get” increased to 49.1 percent from 44.8 percent, while those stating jobs are “plentiful” declined to 4.7 percent from 5.1 percent.Those anticipating more jobs in the months ahead decreased to 11.4 percent from 16.9 percent, while those expecting fewer jobs increased to 31.5 percent from 22.2 percent. The proportion of consumers anticipating an increase in their incomes dropped to 14.3 percent from 15.9 percent.

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    Associated Press Starbucks Corp. said Tuesday it will have packages of its Keurig coffee pods available at U.S. grocery stores and specialty retailers beginning in November.

    Starbucks jumping into single-cup capsule market

    Starbucks Corp., the world’s largest coffee-shop operator, will begin selling its namesake coffee and Tazo tea brand in Keurig single-cup packets in November.“We’ll be launching in U.S. food, drug, mass, special and department store channels in early November,” Jeffery Hansberry, president of Starbucks’ global consumer products business, said in a telephone interview yesterday. Retailers including Wal-Mart Stores Inc. and Target Corp. will sell the K-Cups, he said.Chief Executive Officer Howard Schultz has sought to boost sales with single-serve beverages that customers can brew at home. This year, the Seattle-based company began selling Via instant-coffee packets in China and in March signed a deal with Green Mountain Coffee Roasters Inc. to sell K-Cup capsules for Green Mountain’s Keurig brewer.“There will be some cannibalization,” said Phillip Juhan, an analyst at BMO Capital Markets in Atlanta. “The Keurig machine certainly has convenience advantages so I think that you’ll see some conversion” from Starbucks packaged coffee to K-Cups. Juhan rates the shares “outperform.”Starbucks fell 14 cents to $37.91 at 10:03 a.m. New York time on the Nasdaq Stock Market. The shares gained 18 percent this year before today.The company is doubling the number of countries where it sells Via, Hansberry said. Next month, Singapore, Thailand, Malaysia, Indonesia, South Korea and Australia will introduce the instant coffee.Growth Plans“Our ambition is to build a consumer-packaged goods business that one day could rival the size of our Starbucks retail business,” he said.The K-Cups may add as much as 5 cents to earnings per share in fiscal 2012, Chief Financial Officer Troy Alstead said on a conference call in July. Revenue for Starbucks’ global consumer- products and food-service segment, which includes packaged coffee and tea sold in grocery stores, increased 26 percent to $266 million in the third quarter ended July 3, as total company revenue rose 12 percent to $2.93 billion.About 9.1 million U.S. households have a Keurig brewer, compared with 5.4 million a year ago, according to Mitchell Pinheiro, an analyst at Janney Montgomery Scott in Philadelphia. He advises buying Green Mountain shares.Net sales for Green Mountain’s Keurig business jumped 55 percent to $308.7 million in the quarter ended June 25 as consumers bought more single-cup brewers and K-Cups. Waterbury, Vermont-based Green Mountain sells K-Cups under different brands including Caribou Coffee, Gloria Jean’s and Van Houtte.Earlier this month, Dunkin’ Brands Group Inc., the operator of 6,800 Dunkin’ Donuts stores in the U.S., started selling K-Cups in its shops. Starbucks has about 10,900 U.S. cafes.

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    A crew member places a sandwich onto an Electolux grill at The Melt in San Francisco. Owner Jonathan Kaplan ís starting a grilled cheese restaurant business that combines fast food with high tech.

    Grilled cheese with a high tech twist

    SAN FRANCISCO — Jonathan Kaplan made it easy for consumers to shoot cheesy home movies when he founded the company behind the Flip Video camcorder. Now, he’s hoping to popularize something cheesier — and gooier — by starting a chain of grilled cheese restaurants that combine fast food with high tech.Kaplan’s latest creation, The Melt, opens its first location Tuesday in San Francisco’s SoMa neighborhood. Plans are in the works for two more restaurants in San Francisco and one in nearby Palo Alto by Thanksgiving. With financial backing from a venture-capital heavyweight, Sequoia Capital, Kaplan hopes to open 25 to 50 restaurants within the next year and about 500 across the country within five years.No matter how much people like grilled cheese, Kaplan’s plan is audacious, considering the state of the economy. Still, he believes building this kind of business makes sense, particularly during a time of uncertainty. “Economically, it’s a good time right now because people want comfort food,” he says, seated on a stool at one of the bar-height tables at his bright white-and-orange-hued eatery.Kaplan was flipping around the idea for The Melt even before the creation of the Flip Video, which the company he co-founded, Pure Digital, began selling in 2007. About 10 years ago, Kaplan says, he started researching grilled cheese to see if it could become the main food attraction for a national chain. As part of his research, he solicited customers’ opinions about the sandwich at the giant Mall of America in Bloomington, Minn. He was buoyed by their responses.Kaplan was convinced a grilled cheese chain could succeed, but there was one big sticking point: How do you make the sandwiches consistent when you have hourly employees — who aren’t professional chefs — behind the counter?Not sure how to solve this problem at the time, he put his plan on the back burner. In the meantime, he started Pure Digital. The company’s Flip Video, a simple, low-cost, pocket-sized video camera, paved the way for an entire market. In 2009, Cisco Systems Inc. bought Pure Digital for $590 million as part of an effort to branch out from its core business of making computer networking equipment. Kaplan became general manager of Cisco’s consumer products division.But Kaplan left Cisco in February. Two months later, Cisco discontinued Flip Video and shut down Pure Digital as it gave up in part on its goals for the consumer market. Kaplan decided it was time to give grilled cheese a go.With a small group of advisers — including chef and restaurateur Michael Mina — Kaplan approached Swedish home appliance maker Electrolux about making a special contraption that would create uniform grilled cheese sandwiches. They came up with a machine that combines two induction burners, a microwave and non-stick pads, which allow the bread to toast while the cheese melts — without squishing the sandwich as a panini press might do.Not surprisingly, given Kaplan’s background, technology also comes into play in the way visitors can order their meals. If you don’t want to wait in line, you can order on a smartphone using The Melt’s website. After placing an order, you receive a QR code — a cousin to the traditional bar code, but with more data encoded in a smaller space. You bring that to a code reader in the restaurant for scanning, and an employee then gathers up your order. When The Melt has more locations up and running, customers will be able to choose where to redeem their codes, Kaplan says.He believes the technology in use at The Melt will improve the customer experience, “rather than technology that is just there for marketing reasons or technology for technology’s sake.”

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    Lenders continued to increase their appetite for risk in the second quarter of 2011, according to a report by Schaumburg-based Experian Automotive.

    Report: Auto lenders increased risk in 2Q

    Lenders continued to increase their appetite for risk in the second quarter of 2011, according to a report by Schaumburg-based Experian Automotive.

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    Spring buying pushed home prices up for a third straight month in most major U.S. cities in June. But the housing market remains shaky, and further price declines are expected this year.

    Spring buying boosts home prices in US cities

    Spring buying pushed home prices up for a third straight month in most major U.S. cities in June. But the housing market remains shaky, and further price declines are expected this year.

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    Boeing says it’s planning to redesign the LEAP turbofan engine of its workhorse 737 airplane in an effort to quickly match growing competition from rival plane maker Airbus.

    Boeing approves upgrading 737 after 496 order commitments

    Chicago-based Boeing Co. approved development of an upgraded 737 with more fuel-efficient engines after winning 496 order commitments from five airlines

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    UOP breaks ground on Hawaii biofuel system

    UOP LLC, a Des Plaines-based Honeywell company, has begun construction in Hawaii of a biofuels demonstration unit that will convert forest residuals, algae and other cellulosic biomass into green transportation fuels.Backed by a $25 million U.S. Department of Energy award, the Honeywell UOP Integrated Biorefinery will upgrade biomass into high-quality renewable gasoline, diesel and jet fuel. The project is part of the DOE’s efforts to help spur the creation of the domestic biofuel industry, drive domestic job creation and reduce U.S. dependence on foreign oil.The project will also support the Hawaii Clean Energy Initiative goal to achieve 70 percent clean energy by the year 2030.Located at the Tesoro Corp. refinery in Kapolei, the integrated biorefinery will be used to demonstrate viability of the technology, test the fuels produced and evaluate the environmental footprint of the fuels and the process technology. The project, which will generate more than 80 new jobs during construction, is scheduled to begin initial production in 2012. It is expected to be fully operational by 2014.“Biomass is abundantly available today, and it is an important opportunity to consider as we seek alternatives that will reduce our dependence on fossil fuels and improve our environmental footprint,” said Jim Rekoske, vice president and general manager of Renewable Energy and Chemicals for Honeywell’s UOP. “Our Integrated Biorefinery will illustrate these benefits as well the potential that biorefineries have to enhance the local economy and provide new green jobs.”U.S. Sen. Daniel K. Inouye noted the project will help Hawaii become less dependent on imported fossil fuels.“Hawaii will play a critical role in helping the domestic biofuel industry thrive and this project will create much needed jobs in Kapolei,” Inouye said. “I am also pleased that Honeywell’s UOP is partnering with a number of local stakeholders including Hawaii BioEnergy, Group 70, Kai Hawaii, University of Hawaii and Leeward Community College. I will do all I can to ensure that Hawaii continues to serve as the laboratory for renewable energy initiatives in the Pacific.”Once successfully proven in this demonstration unit, a commercial-scale facility using the same technology could produce as much as 50 million gallons of drop-in green transportation fuels per year and could create as many as 800 new construction jobs and 1,000 new jobs in biomass production and refinery operations, Rekoske said.

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    ADP Third Party Access Program adds 10,000th connection

    HOFFMAN ESTATES — ADP Dealer Services, a division of Automatic Data Processing Inc., announced its Third Party Access Program now delivers over 10,000 vendor connections, enabling vendors throughout the automotive retail segment direct, real-time access to the ADP Dealership Management System.This number represents thousands of ADP DMS dealers based in North America who have a third party vendor of their choice using ADP’s interfaces.ADP’s Third Party Access Program provides open integration for third parties wanting to access the ADP DMS’s network of dealers in order to provide various products and services to those dealers or to integrate those products and services to the ADP DMS. The growth of the program since its inception over ten years ago demonstrates ADP’s ongoing commitment to an open system.“ADP’s continuing goal is to offer an open system, and we’re excited to see our Third Party Access Program expand beyond this significant milestone,” states Dan McCray, vice president of product marketing for ADP Dealer Services.

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    State farm’s irene insurance claims top 17,000, led by Maryland

    State Farm Mutual Automobile Insurance Co., the largest U.S. home and car insurer, said it has received more than 17,000 claims from damage tied to Irene.The preliminary total includes 15,340 claims from residential policies and 1,910 from autos, the Bloomington, Illinois-based insurer said today in an e-mailed statement. Maryland was responsible for 3,364 home claims, and Virginia, North Carolina, New Jersey and New York each had more than 2,000, the company said.

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    S. Africa’s solidarity union declares wage dispute with eEkom

    South Africa’s Solidarity labor union has declared a dispute with Eskom Holdings SOC Ltd., the country’s state-owned power company, over a unilateral decision to increase wages by 7 percent.Solidarity, based in Johannesburg, commented in an e-mailed statement today.

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    Rusal will join two new hong kong stock exchange indexes

    United Co. Rusal, the largest aluminum producer, will join two new Hong Kong stock exchange indexes from Sept. 5, helping to expand its investor base.Rusal will make up 10 percent of the Hang Seng Foreign Companies Composite Index and join the Global Composite Index, the Moscow-based company said today in an e-mailed statement.The company is expanding its investor base and improving liquidity by entering additional Hang Seng indexes, said Oleg Mukhamedshin, Rusal’s director for corporate development.Prada SpA, Glencore International Plc and Vale SA will be among the other stocks joining the Foreign Companies Composite.“The number of foreign companies listed in Hong Kong has been increasing rapidly in the past year,” Vincent Kwan, director and general manager of Hang Seng Indexes Co., said in the statement. “The Hang Seng Foreign Companies Composite Index provides investors a convenient benchmark in monitoring the price performance of this group of companies.”Rusal’s Russian depositary receipts were added to the 30- stock Micex Index in July after MSCI said RDRs aren’t eligible for inclusion in the review of the MSCI Russia Index in May.

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    Lufthansa ceo predicts profit gain on fuel hedging, maintenance

    Deutsche Lufthansa AG Chief Executive Officer Christoph Franz said Europe’s second-biggest carrier aims to boost earnings this year as fuel hedging and non-airline operations leave it better placed than rivals.Franz said he’s targeting a “positive result” versus 2010, when earnings before interest and tax totaled 876 million euros ($1.26 billion). Lufthansa is hedged on 75 percent of 2011 fuel needs, according to its website, while the Lufthansa Technik and LSG SkyChefs overhaul and catering units aren’t subject to a German aviation tax, Franz said, diminishing the levy’s impact.“We are relatively stable in an unstable industry,” Franz said last night at a briefing in Frankfurt, where Cologne, Germany-based Lufthansa has its main hub. “We had not at all taken the rise in oil prices into account, but have been protected against it by our hedging policy.”Air France-KLM Group, which posted net income of 613 million euros in the year ended March 31, reiterated on July 28 that its goal is simply to be profitable this year. Both it and Lufthansa said that day that they would rein in capacity after earnings for the three months through June missed estimates.The International Air Transport Association predicts a 78 percent drop in airline-industry net income this year to $4 billion, delivering a 0.7 percent margin, as earnings are crimped by fuel costs, a sluggish economy and higher taxes.Lufthansa has said hedging positions benefit it when oil is priced above $94 a barrel and estimates its full-year fuel bill at 6.4 billion euros, down from 6.8 billion euros originally. Brent crude for October settlement was priced at about $112 today on the London-based ICE Futures Europe exchange.BMI, AustrianThe German carrier is also trimming winter capacity growth to 6 percent from 12 percent by using smaller planes, deferring planned routes and shutting the Lufthansa Italia unit, while wrapping up a program to cut costs by 1 billion euros from 2008.Lufthansa will continue with efforts to turn around its unprofitable British Midland and Austrian Airlines units, Franz said in the briefing, while declining to rule out disposing of the businesses should those efforts prove unsuccessful.

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    Coffee falls as growers in brazil sell after rally; sugar drops

    Coffee fell in New York as growers in Brazil, the largest producer, sold beans after prices climbed to a three-month high. Sugar also declined.Prices climbed 6 percent over the past week to the three- month high yesterday. Growers in Brazil’s Sao Paulo and Minas Gerais states have picked 93 percent of the crop, according to Somar Meteorologia. Warm and dry weather this week should favor harvesting and bean drying, Marco Antonio dos Santos, an agronomist at the company, wrote in a report e-mailed yesterday.“Brazilian producers have been good scale-up sellers during the recent rally,” Luis Rangel, vice-president of commodity derivatives at ICAP Futures LLC in Jesey City, New Jersey, said in an e-mail today. “Roasters are not chasing it higher.”Arabica coffee for December delivery fell 0.3 cent, or 0.1 percent, to $2.8415 a pound by 8:37 a.m. on ICE Futures U.S. in New York. Robusta coffee for November delivery climbed $18, or 0.8 percent, to $2,380 a ton on NYSE Liffe in London. The price earlier today rose to $2,411, the highest since Aug. 24.Robusta coffee climbed on speculation European stockpiles will fall with supplies limited in Vietnam, the world’s largest producer of the variety. Arabica beans are grown mostly in Latin America and favored by specialty coffee shops, while robusta beans are harvested mainly in Asia and Africa.Robusta InventoriesRobusta coffee inventories with valid grading certificates were 398,090 metric tons as of Aug. 22, down 1.6 percent from two weeks earlier, a third consecutive fall, NYSE Liffe figures on Aug. 25 showed.“The tight supply in the robusta market due to lack of farmer selling is likely supporting the price,” Keith Flury, an analyst at Rabobank International in London, said in an e-mail today.Raw sugar for October delivery fell 0.27 cent, or 0.9 percent, to 29.62 cents a pound in New York. White, or refined, sugar for October delivery dropped $10.10, or 1.3 percent, to $770.50 a ton in London.Brazil’s agriculture ministry’s crop-forecasting agency, known as Conab, will release its second estimate for this year’s sugar-cane crop at 9 a.m. Brasilia time today.Cocoa for December delivery fell $29, or 0.9 percent, to $3,106 a ton on ICE. Cocoa for December rose 13 pounds, or 0.7 percent, to 1,952 pounds ($3,184) a ton on NYSE Liffe.

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    Barclays to sell 2 billion euros of three-year covered bonds
    Barclays Bank Plc will sell 2 billion euros of three-year covered bonds at a yield of 52 basis points more than the benchmark mid-swap rate, according to a banker involved in the transaction.

  •  
    Danish toy maker Lego says its first-half profit rose 32 percent as the family-owned company continued to increase its market share.

    Lego’s half-year 2011 profit soars 32 pct

    Danish toy maker Lego says its first-half profit rose 32 percent as the family-owned company continued to increase its market share.

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    Tourism dilemma: Irene’s gone but summer’s not

    If you fix it, they will come.That’s the mantra — and the desperate hope — of tourism-dependent towns along the East Coast as they deal with the aftermath of Hurricane Irene, which hit just eight days before Labor Day.

  •  

    Polish economy grows 4.3 pct on the year in Q2

    Poland’s economy grew 4.3 percent year-on-year in the second quarter, a slight slowdown over previous quarters but still one of the strongest growth rates in Europe.

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    Banks urged to stop Zimbabwe ‘blood diamond’ sales

    Human rights groups are calling on foreign financial institutions vested in Zimbabwean banks to stop enabling the sale of so-called “blood diamonds.”

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    Business, consumer optimism slips in Europe
    Business and consumer optimism in the 17 countries that use the euro fell in August, reinforcing fears that the eurozone economy will slow in the months ahead.

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    Italian borrowing rates drop in 10-year bond sale

    Italian borrowing rates dropped in a pair of bond sales that easily raised (euro) 6.739 billion ($9.76 billion), thanks largely to the European Central Bank’s program to buy government debt.

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    Murdoch company puts other UK papers under review

    A person familiar with the matter says that a review launched at Rupert Murdoch’s News International in the wake of the tabloid phone hacking scandal will also weigh journalistic standards at its other U.K titles, including The Times of London.

Life & Entertainment

  •  
    Actor Ed O’Neill, center, poses with actress Katey Sagal, left, who played his wife in the Fox series “Married with Children,” and Sofia Vergara, who currently plays his wife in the ABC comedy “Modern Family” Tuesday after receiving a star of the Hollywood Walk of Fame in Los Angeles.

    O’Neill’s Walk of Fame star in front of shoe store

    LOS ANGELES — Ed O’Neill’s star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame is appropriately placed: in front of a DSW shoe store on Hollywood Boulevard.O’Neill earned his fame playing shoe salesman Al Bundy on the long-running sitcom “Married With Children.” The Emmy-nominated star of “Modern Family” received his sidewalk honor Tuesday in a ceremony featuring his two TV wives, Sofia Vergara from ABC’s “Modern” and Katey Sagal from “Married,” which aired on Fox.O’Neill called the honor overwhelming and thanked fans, then quipped, “Just think, somewhere in this world a baby girl is being born and she is going to be my next wife.” Vergara is 26 years his junior, and Sagal 11.The 65-year-old O’Neill attended Ohio University and Youngstown State. He was signed by the Pittsburgh Steelers but cut in training camp. He taught social studies before his acting career.

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    Justin Bieber, his Ferrari fine after minor crash

    Justin Bieber and his Ferrari are both fine after a fender-bender in Los Angeles. Los Angeles Police Officer Gregory Baek says the 17-year-old singer was involved in “a very minor collision” Tuesday afternoon in LA’s Studio City.

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    Spectators look at the ruined boardwalk in Spring Lake, N.J., hours after Hurricane Irene damaged most of the two-mile walkway.

    East Coast towns hoping tourists not scared away

    Tourism-dependent towns along the East Coast, dealing with the aftermath of Hurricane Irene, which hit just eight days before Labor Day, are terrified the tourists will simply call it a season and stay away until next summer.

  •  

    Sauvignon Blanc gains ground

    Sauvignon Blanc sales are up nearly 10 percent this year, closing the lead long-held by Chardonnay. Food-friendliness is a major factor in Sauvignon Blanc's success. America's most-popular international cuisines — Mexican and Greek among them, are especially suited to Sauvignon Blanc's herbal accents and citrusy acidity.

  •  
    The comic strip “Family Circus” is one of more than 90 cartoons, which will be dedicated to the anniversary of the Sept. 11 terror attacks.

    Cartoonists draw up Sept. 11 tribute

    With the Sept. 11 anniversary falling on a Sunday, more than 90 cartoonists with five different syndicates have banded together to dedicate their strips to those whose lives were lost in the attacks. Sept. 11-themed strips will appear from the writers and artists of “Family Circus,” “Mallard Fillmore,” “Candorville,” “Doonesbury” and “Pluggers,” among others.

  •  
    Red Hot Chili Peppers' “I'm With You”

    Red Hot Chili Peppers are all grown up

    The Red Hot Chili Peppers have remained musically relevant for almost three decades by tweaking their formula. Their 10th effort, “I'm With You,” continues that evolution, revealing that the funk-rockers are growing up.

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    Lil Wayne's “Tha Carter IV”

    Lil Wayne's ‘Carter IV' doesn't show growth

    Lil Wayne's “Tha Carter IV” proves an unworthy successor to his 2008 Grammy-winning “Carter III.” Missing a golden opportunity to reflect on his time locked up, Wayne reveals little. His world is chock-full of words, empty of meaning.

  •  
    Blues singer David “Honeyboy” Edwards died of congestive heart failure Monday in his Chicago apartment. He was 96.

    Bluesman David ‘Honey Boy’ Edwards dead at 96

    Blues musician David “Honey Boy” Edwards, whose roots stretched back to blues legend Robert Johnson, is dead. Edwards died of congestive heart failure Monday morning in his Chicago apartment at age 96.

  •  
    Three Dog Night will play old favorites and new recordings Sunday, Sept. 4, at Viper Alley in Lincolnshire.

    Three Dog Night to rock Lincolnshire's Viper Alley

    On Sunday, Sept. 4, Three Dog Night will headline two shows at Viper Alley in Lincolnshire and perform a truckload of their hits, many of which have become classic rock standards, including “Joy to the World,” “One” and “Shambala.”

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    Actor George Clooney's “Ides of March” will open a star-studded Venice Film Festival Wednesday.

    Clooney's ‘Ides' to open Venice film fest

    George Clooney's “The Ides of March” opens a star-studded Venice Film Festival on Wednesday, and fans will also see two other Hollywood actor/directors, Madonna and Al Pacino, premiering their latest directorial efforts. Clooney's political drama is among 23 films — five from Hollywood — vying for the coveted Golden Lion, which will be awarded Sept. 10.

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    'Dancing With the Stars' unveils new lineup

    The new cast of “Dancing With the Stars” has been revealed. Set to tango and quickstep with professional dance partners will be basketball star Ron Artest; World Cup soccer player Hope Solo; reality stars Robert Kardashian, Kristin Cavallari and Chaz Bono among others.

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    Poi Dog Pondering performs at 6 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 3, at Naperville’s Last Fling.

    Music notes: Poi Dog plays Naperville’s Last Fling

    Enjoy a last blast of the outdoor concert season as Poi Dog Pondering, Sister Hazel and The Gin Blossoms send out summer at Naperville's Last Fling starting at 4 p.m. Saturday.

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    Spy Adam Jensen looks for clues in a media company's headquarters in “Deus Ex: Human Revolution.”

    Man meets machine in thrilling ‘Deus Ex'

    “Human Revolution” is a prequel to 2000's “Deus Ex,” but even if you're unfamiliar with the original, do not skip this new chapter. It's a worthy successor, and it's revolutionary in its own way.

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    Molcajete — skirt steak with green onions, banana peppers, queso fresco and black beans — is one of the options at Casa Bonita in Libertyville.

    Libertyville's Casa Bonita cooks up homey Mexican fare

    Mi casa, su casa -- my house is your house -- is a welcoming Spanish phrase that fits the atmosphere at Libertyville's Casa Bonita, which boasts an attractive hacienda-style dining room and homey meals.

Discuss

  •  

    Cooperation key in foreclosure blight
    A Daily Herald editorial emphasizes that residents and government must work together when it comes to addressing the growing blight in suburbn neighborhoods from home foreclosures.

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    Congo’s rule by the ruthless

    Each month about 140 to 180 tired, hungry FDLR rebels decide to accept amnesty and return home. U.N. officials believe that about 2,500 remain in the bush. They still commit serial horrors. The hardest core is likely to fight to the end. But on the current trend, says one official, “the FDLR can’t survive in its current form for another year or two.”

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    Scott Brown no shoe-in for re-election

    Rick Perry’s blowharding about Texan superiority doesn’t go over great in a state that could be called the “anti-Texas” culturally. Comparing states with wildly different populations, climates, natural resources and histories is generally pointless, but since Perry insists, let’s continue.

  •  

    Don’t blame unions for financial mess
    Letter to the Editor: The fact is that Wisconsin teachers made all the concessions that they were asked to make. The fact is that the new governors of Wisconsin, Indiana and Ohio want to stop all collective bargaining. They want you to think that the problem is wages and pension, not the improper use of tax dollars.

  •  

    Going green shouldn’t have to be fun
    Letter to the Editor: As an environmental person for the last five years I continually ask myself how do we get more people onboard to save money, go green, and help the Earth? Everyone says you have to make it fun. Are they right? We are the ME generation. It has to be fun, or we won’t do it, they say.

  •  

    Put on a hat or get back to work
    Letter to the Editor: You ask if the job has aged President Obama? No, the sun has from all that golf.

  •  

    Where’s the outcry over Syrian attack?
    The message from the Middle East is clear. Muslim troops slaughtering Muslim refugees is just “business as usual,” and civilized nations just keep your righteous anger directed toward the democratic nation of Israel.

  •  

    Obama, Democrats caved to tea party
    Let’s face it: the tea party has won, hands down. The Democrats have not only struck out, they’ve resigned, they’ve forfeited the game to the loudmouths.

  •  

    Obama jobs plan may not be enough
    Roosevelt would probably be the first to acknowledge that his make-work projects never addressed a single economic factor that had brought on the Great Depression. But than, neither would a president like Roosevelt ever have promised Americans that he would get around to solving that greatest economic calamity that ever faced this nation, just as soon as he returned from vacation.

  •  

    DuPage obviously not center of universe
    A Category 1 hurricane rolls along the Outer Banks, but it may bother Wall Street and D.C. so we are subjected to days of blather about winds and rain. A minor earthquake hits in Virginia and the cable blabbers have hissy fits all day long. A few weeks back, a storm hit DuPage County with higher winds and rain. Power outages lasted for days. The state declared disaster areas for Carol Stream and Glendale Heights, but that’s no media or political center.

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    Can we take more honest government?
    We have had honest government in Illinois now for about two years. Since then, our income tax was increased and now the cost of using our toll roads will also increase. The RTA is also talking about fare increases and cut backs because in part, the state isn’t making its payments to RTA.

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