Football Focus 2014

Daily Archive : Monday August 8, 2011

News

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    Autopsy set for triathlon death of Elmhurst woman

    State officials will perform an autopsy Tuesday on the body of a 40-year-old Elmhurst woman who died Monday after participating in the New York City Triathlon on Sunday. The woman's identification has not been officially confirmed.

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    South Elgin police uncovered about 600 pounds of marijuana Friday, marking the biggest marijuana bust in the police department's 50-year history. It all started with an anonymous tip from a confidential police source.

    600-pound pot seizure biggest ever in South Elgin

    An anonymous tip led South Elgin police to a car that had 100 pounds of marijuana in it and another 500 pounds back at the driver's house, police say. That is by far the biggest pot bust in the department's history.

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    Adopt a Lake County highway, help keep roads clean

    The Adopt-A-Highway program is an excellent opportunity to contribute to a cleaner, “greener” environment in Lake County. Now is your opportunity to enroll in the program. The county’s transportation division is accepting applications through Aug. 26.

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    Rev up the Harley for annual ride to benefit Pioneer Center
    Register now for the “Pioneer,” the fifth annual motorcycle ride taking place Saturday, Aug. 13. All proceeds from the event will benefit the many programs of Pioneer Center for Human Services.

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    Peggy Hernandez, left, and Jennifer McDonnell stand in the Elgin Area School District U-46 Planetarium in front of a scene using its new full-dome projector. Hernandez is a teacher and director of the planetarium. McDonnell is coordinator of Math, Science, Planetarium & Instructional Technology for U-46.

    U-46 planetarium to debut new projector

    The U-46 Planetarium is presenting its first full dome show. The digital projector used for the show is a new addition to the planetarium’s technology and will allow visitors an almost 360-degree view of images projected on the dome. The first show is scheduled for Aug. 10.

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    Construction continues this week on the new Ross Dress for Less shop in the Algonquin Commons on Randall Road. The store is scheduled to open Oct. 8 and at 11 other locations including South Elgin, Bloomingdale, Schaumburg, Naperville and Crystal Lake.

    Ross Dress for Less to open in Algonquin, Elgin

    Ross Dress for Less, which bills itself as offering 20 to 60 percent off department and specialty store prices on clothes, footware and household goods, will open 12 locations in the Chicago area Oct. 8, including stores in South Elgin, Algonquin, Bloomingdale, Naperville, Schaumburg and Crystal Lake.

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    Music fans attend the Lollapalooza music festival Saturday at Grant Park in Chicago. Portugal. The Man's van and trailer full of equipment was stolen Sunday after the close of the festival.

    Band's van, equipment stolen after Lollapalooza

    The band "Portugal. The Man" which performed at Lollapalooza Sunday night is trying to prevent whoever stole their van and attached trailer from selling off tens of thousands of dollars worth of "irreplaceable" equipment.

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    After a family vacation visiting the grand monuments in Washington, D.C., I am grateful for the chance to return to the family plot in the cemetery of Goodland, Ind., and sit on this simple stone bench in memory of my brother, Bill, 48, who died a year ago today.

    Memorials for Lincoln, soldiers, my brother tell us what we had

    After visiting impressive monuments and memorials during a vacation in our nation's capital, we come home to discover an equally powerful display at the rural Indiana gravesite of my brother, who died one year ago today.

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    Riders pile up with one lap remaining in the third stage of the Tour of Elk Grove's men's professional race Sunday afternoon.

    Johnson: Tour of Elk Grove finished strong despite crash

    This weekend's sixth annual Alexian Brothers Tour of Elk Grove finished out strong despite a crash in the final lap of the men's professional race Sunday. While observers initially speculated a pothole or wet road conditions may have been to blame, witnesses said it was caused by a rider getting out of line.

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    Des Plaines man pleads guilty to cocaine delivery

    A Cook County judge sentenced Cesar Rodriguez, 43, to nine years in prison Monday in exchange for the Des Plaines resident's guilty plea to two counts of delivery of a controlled substance last June in Schaumburg.

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    A newly released report concludes that Fawell Dam near Naperville may contribute to increased flood elevations in parts of Warrenville during large storm events.

    Dam helps flood Warrenville, report says

    A dam designed to keep Naperville properties dry may contribute to flooding upstream in neighboring Warrenville during extreme rainfalls, a report says. But Warrenville shouldn’t push for dramatic changes to the Fawell Dam. “The dam isn’t the cure-all for us,” said Ronald Mentzner, Warrenville’s community development director. “There’s other things that...

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    Misdemeanor charges dismissed against Mount Prospect teen

    Cook County prosecutors dismissed misdemeanor charges of unlawful consumption of alcohol by a minor against 19-year-old Keith J. Huff of Mount Prospect.

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    Judge dismisses Rob Sherman’s lawsuit against Indian Trails

    The tax hike approved by voters for the Indian Trails Public Library will stand, as a judge has dismissed a lawsuit that sought to nullify the vote in April.

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    Improvements were last made to the Village Links of Glen Ellyn in 2003. A master plan suggests upgrades to the clubhouse and portions of the 27-hole course, but Village President Mark Pfefferman has expressed reservations about the plan’s scope.

    Glen Ellyn mayor wants more from Village Links plan

    Glen Ellyn Village President Mark Pfefferman says a plan that suggests improvements to a village-owned golf course doesn’t go far enough in addressing possible long-term uses of the facility.

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    Geneva debates owners’ rights in historic districts

    Geneva's city council and residents debated property rights vs. community good, as the council considers keeping the power to designate properties as historic landmarks without a property owner's consent. “The current ordinance leaves one with the feeling that the city can do something TO us. Wouldn’t it be better to feel that the city can do something FOR us?” said one of the...

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    Barrington mom charged with hosting drinking party

    Five people were arrested after a Barrington drinking party. Julie A. McPike, 49, of the 200 block of Beverly Road, Barrington, was arrested July 28 and charged with hosting an underage drinking party at her home. Four 18-year-olds were arrested and charged with consumption of alcohol by a minor.

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    Lake Villa Twp. shooting a murder-suicide attempt

    A shooting in Lake Villa Township that left one man dead and a woman injured appears to be an attempted murder-suicide, Lake County Coroner’s Office officials said today. The dead man was identified as Gordon D. Olsen, 52, of the 36000 block of N. Lawrence Court, Lake County Coroner Artis Yancey said.

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    Timera Branch

    Trial begins in Elgin car ramming murder

    Vetedia James testified in court Monday in the trial of a Streamwood woman accused of using her car to run down her son's rival. “At first I thought it was people trying to help him. When I saw what was going on, I realized it wasn't an accident,” James said.

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    Coroner: Man drowned in Duck Lake, not suspicious

    Lake County coroner officials said a man found dead in Duck Lake on Sunday was reported missing and endangered by the Fox Lake Police Department 24 hours earlier. The victim was identified as Vladimir Taraday, 65, with an unknown last address, said Lake County Coroner Artis Yancey.

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    City takes steps to prepare for flooding

    Prospect Heights City Council will spend up to $50,000 from the road bonds to study drainage issues in the city and also took other steps to prepare for flooding.

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    St. Charles school district OKs budget with surplus

    St. Charles Unit District 303 school board member Jim Gaffney sees a deficit on the horizon, and that fueled Gaffney’s lone “no” vote on a 2011-12 budget that actually predicts a small surplus to end the fiscal year. Projections show a $5.7 million deficit by 2016. "That's not a lot of time," Gaffney said.

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    Dist. 300 re-examines schedule changes

    The Community Unit District 300 school board reviewed the first part of a plan to reorganize secondary school schedules. The rationale for the schedule changes at the middle and high schools includes new assessment criteria, student-teacher relationships and greater understanding of students learning.

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    A lawsuit claims former Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld bears personal responsibility for U.S. forces allegedly torturing two American contractors in Iraq.

    Court allows torture lawsuit against Rumsfeld

    A lawsuit accusing former Defense Secretary Donald Rumsfeld of personal responsibility for U.S. forces allegedly torturing two American whistleblowers who worked for an Iraqi contracting firm will be allowed to move forward, a federal appeals court ruled Monday.

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    Lou Bertuca, right, seen here in 2009 with Illinois Gov. Pat Quinn, has been named deputy chief of staff at the Illinois State Toll Highway Authority.

    Quinn insider tapped for tollway job

    A high-ranking staffer for Gov. Pat Quinn moves over to the Illinois tollway.

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    Kids’ activity explores wildlife at Barrington area creek

    Citizens for Conservation will present “Up a Creek with CFC,” a No Child Left Inside class, from 1 to 5 p.m. on Saturday, Aug. 20. Join in a fun-filled afternoon with sein ing expert Tom Vanderpoel.

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    Elgin council to discuss Sustainability Action Plan

    The culmination of a multiyear effort to develop a plan for Elgin’s sustainability future is finally coming before the city’s governing body. Council members will discuss the Sustainability Action Plan, which consists of recommendations that reduce resource use and energy consumption in the city, during the committee of the whole meeting Wednesday.

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    Real estate foundation gives money

    Two groups based in Arlington Heights and one based in Zion receive grants from Coldwell Banker foundation.

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    Elgin dog violence leaves a poodle and pit bull dead

    Elgin police responded to three different calls Sunday concerning violent dogs. In one, a poodle died from a pit bull attack. In another, police had to shoot and kill a loose pit bull. And in the third, a dog suffered puncture wounds to its neck after being bit by what its owners defined as a boxer/Labrador mix.

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    Smoking pot while driving nets probation sentence

    A Rolling Meadows man pleaded guilty to unlawful possession of cannabis. He was charged after he was reported to be driving while smoking pot.

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    Samadhi Vibe to play in Mundelein

    The band Samadhi Vibe will play rock, funk and blues music Aug. 14 at Kracklauer Park as part of Mundelein’s outdoor concert series.

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    Fundraiser to benefit 4-H

    The University of Illinois Lake County Extension Foundation is hosting a barbecue and family festival from 10 a.m. to dusk Saturday, Aug. 13 at the Lake County fairgrounds, Midlothian and Peterson roads in Grayslake.

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    Vote on D46 boss’ contract:

    Grayslake Elementary District 46 board members meet at 6:30 p.m. Wednesday at Grayslake Middle School off Route 83 at Library Lane, just north of Center Street.

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    State Sen. Dan Kotowski, a Park Ridge Democrat

    Kotowski grades effect of state budget reform

    State Sen. Dan Kotowski last year heralded the passage of legislation that would reform the way the state lays out its budget as "fundamentally the most important thing" he'd done in office. But how's it work now that it's in practice?

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    Work has begun to restore the 138-year-old Itasca train depot to its original state as part of a $525,000 project that will create the Itasca Milwaukee Road Depot Historical Museum.

    Itasca museum to see $525,000 upgrade

    The antiques popping up at sites such as the Itasca Library aren't part of a retro redecorating kick. Instead, they are temporary exhibits on display as the 138-year-old Itasca Historical Depot Museum undergoes a $525,000 transformation.

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    Police reports

    An estimated $1,000 damage was done to a stamped concrete sidewalk between 11:45 a.m. and 2:30 p.m. July 26 when a semitrailer turned around in a driveway of a home in the 42W300 block of Hughes Road near Elburn,

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    Karen Paxton, 55, of Round Lake Park, who was arrested Aug. 7 and charged with hosting an underage drinking party. She is multiple counts of unlawfully permitting a minor to become intoxicated.

    Police arrest 18 at Round Lake Park underage drinking party

    A 55-year-old Round Lake Park woman has been charged with hosting an underage drinking party that was busted by police, law enforcement officials said Monday. Karen Paxton, of the 400 block of Greenwood Drive, faces multiple counts of unlawfully permitting a minor to become intoxicated following her arrest at 1:30 a.m. Sunday, Round Lake Park Police Chief George Filenko said.

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    The old Short Street bridge in Lisle needed to be replaced because it was deteriorating, officials said. A replacement bridge is scheduled to open Thursday.

    Lisle bridge to reopen Thursday

    A reconstructed Short Street bridge in Lisle is poised to reopen to traffic on Thursday morning, nearly a month ahead of schedule. Motorists will be able to use the rebuilt bridge just west of Route 53 after a planned 9 a.m. Thursday ribbon-cutting ceremony, officials said.

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    Mundelein High board eyeing corporate sponsorships

    Mundelein High School could join the ranks of local campuses using corporate sponsorship to offset costs. The District 120 board will meet tonight to discuss whether to develop a corporate-sponsorship policy

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    Jack Daniel McCullough

    Hearing set on reporters' notes in Ill. killing

    A man charged in the 1957 kidnapping and killing of a 7-year-old Illinois girl made a brief court appearance Monday as a legal battle over reporters' notes of a jailhouse interview with him unfolded.

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    Take a trip with Barrington group

    The Barrington Area Council on Aging and Travelex are offering travel opportunities in the year ahead.

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    Chicago names street 'Buddy Guy Way'

    Chicago blues great Buddy Guy now has his own street.

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    Schaumburg’s Got Talent will take place at 6 p.m., Saturday, Aug. 13, at the Community Recreation Center, 505 N. Springinsguth Road. Choose to be part of the contest, perform for fun or just watch the performances.

    Watch or perform in Schaumburg’s Got Talent Aug. 13

    Schaumburg’s Got Talent will take place at 6 p.m., Saturday, Aug. 13, at the Community Recreation Center, 505 N. Springinsguth Road. Choose to be part of the contest, perform for fun or just watch the performance.

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    Dist. 214 offers basic skills class for tech jobs

    District 214 Community Education Adult Education is offering free classes in reading, math and language skills needed for jobs in manufacturing and technology in Arlington Heights.

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    Big Noise opens season with ‘How to Succeed’

    Big Noise Theatre has announced its 2011-12 season at Prairie Lakes Theatre in Des Plaines,opening with "How to Succeed in Business Without Really Trying."

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    Total consumer debt, including mortgages, was $11.5 trillion at the end of the first quarter. And Americans piled more onto credit cards in April than in any month since the middle of 2008.

    Will U.S. downgrade affect your home loan?

    Do you know what kind of loan you have? Whether the market turmoil affects you and your money depends on how you answer that question. Once your loan type is identified, the following information may help you navigate interest rates and monthly payments.

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    Court upholds torture lawsuit against Rumsfeld

    A court says two Americans who worked for an Iraqi contracting firm can move forward with a lawsuit accusing former Defense Secretary Donald Rumsfeld of being responsible for U.S. forces allegedly torturing them.

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    Traders work on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) in New York, U.S., on Monday, Aug. 8, 2011. U.S. stock futures retreated, following the biggest weekly drop in the Standard & Poor’s 500 Index since 2008, amid concern that a downgrade of the nation’s credit rating by S&P may worsen an economic slowdown.

    Images: U.S. and other world markets drop sharply.
    From Germany to Asia and most countries in between, the world stock markets took a big hit on Monday. The U.S. stock market closed down 635 points Monday morning following the downgrade from AAA to AA.

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    House to end page program after nearly 200 years

    After nearly 200 years, the House is ending its page program. The program allowed high school students to serve as messengers for lawmakers while getting a front-row seat to learn about Congress.

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    War of 1812 vet gets grave marker

    Richard Easton was a veteran of the War of 1812, and his remains share a grave yard with Abraham Lincoln's father. But for more than 150 years his grave didn't include a marker.

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    Michael Carvell

    Clarendon Hills man pleads guilty to Naperville burglary

    A Clarendon Hills man accused of breaking into six Naperville businesses within the span of a week faces up to seven years in prison after pleading guilty Monday to burglary.

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    Jeffrey S. Fisher

    Carol Stream man pleads not guilty in fatal Itasca crash

    A Carol Stream man whose girlfriend was killed when his truck crashed into a moving train over the July 4 weekend pleaded not guilty Monday to reckless homicide and aggravated drunken driving. Jeffrey S. Fisher, 40, faces up to 14 years in prison if convicted..

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    Teen accused of killing Kenosha bicyclist

    A teenager faces a felony charge in the death of a bicyclist who was struck and killed in Kenosha County.

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    A copy of Chinese financial magazine featuring the U.S. debt crisis, center, is on sale at a newsstand in Beijing Monday. China, the largest foreign holder of U.S. debt, demanded Saturday America tighten its belt and confront its “addiction to debts.”

    China urges global economic policy coordination

    The official newspaper of China’s ruling Communist Party on Monday lambasted the U.S. for its credit rating downgrade and called for better coordination between the West and developing nations on economic policy.

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    Buyer Davis Hardgrove looks over a gold chain as his seller stacks silver coins also brought in to sell at a coin shop in Seattle. The price of gold streaked past $1,700 an ounce Monday.

    Gold streaks past $1,700 an ounce

    The price of gold streaked past $1,700 an ounce for the first time Monday. Investors, beset by worries about the U.S. debt downgrade, Europe’s financial crisis and slowing global growth, sought safety in the metal as stocks tumbled around the world.

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    United Airlines planes line up for takeoff at O’Hare International Airport. U.S. airlines have started rolling back last month’s fare increases.

    Airlines begin rolling back fare hikes

    U.S. airlines have started rolling back last month’s fare increases, so passengers are likely to pay the same prices even though federal ticket taxes are being collected again.

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    FAA: Shooting range no danger to planes

    The Federal Aviation Administration has determined the Caseyville Rifle and Pistol Club, which is near Scott Air Force Base and MidAmerica St. Louis Airport, poses no danger to aircraft and people.

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    Chicago-area woman deported to Poland to return

    A woman who was deported from the United States to Poland four years ago is returning thanks to help from members of Congress and others who took up her cause.

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    Low enrollment leaves empty EIU dorms

    Several floors of a major campus dorm will be closed when school starts at Eastern Illinois University later this month because enrollment has been down the past couple of years.

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    The one-story Lombard home of Dustin Smith and Cherry Countryman was hit with an electrical fire in 2009, prompting a rebuilding project that won Smith the village's first sustainability award.

    Lombard couple's home rebuild wins sustainability award

    When a fire left Dustin Smith and Cherry Countryman's Lombard home uninhabitable, the idea of rebuilding it using sustainable architecture, landscape elements and appliances came naturally to them. “We made the best of it and really made the most sustainable decisions that we could,” said Smith, 29, a landscape architect.

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    The Illinois State Toll Highway Authority has proposed a $12 billion, 15-year capital plan. The money would pay for upkeep of existing roads and could cost the average commuter $182 more a year in tolls.

    Toll hikes could cost you an extra $182 a year

    With proposed rates going up by 35 cents at half the toll plazas in the area, that could total $3.50 more each week for a driver who hits the Tri-State Touhy plaza twice daily, for example. Multiply that by 52 weeks, and you're looking at $182 more a year.

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    Investigate water life with Citizens for Conservation

    Registration is due Aug. 13 for the Citizens for Conservation class “Up a Creek with CFC,” which will be held Aug. 20. The event, a Leave No Child Inside class, is led by seining expert Tom Vanderpoel.

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    Naperville junior tennis announces tournament winners

    It was another big summer for the Naperville Summer Junior Tennis League, with 24 teams, representing 14 clubs from the Naperville area, meeting Friday afternoons for five weeks of dual-team meets.

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    Coroner identifies man whose body pulled from lake

    The Lake County coroner has identified a man whose body was pulled from a Chicago-area lake as 65-year-old Vladimir Taraday.

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    The band St. Mark’s Social headlined “Rock Rare Disease” July 23. A picture of 6-year-old Bridget Kennicott, whose charity the concert benefited, can be seen behind the band at right.

    Girl’s rare disease starts quest to make a difference

    A duo from Lake Zurich have teamed up to stage fundraisers for reasearch into rare children's diseases. They were inspired, in part, by the experience of a Barrington area family, whose 6-year-old has Batten disease.

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    Bruce Hoffenberg of the band Get Back from Lindenhurst performs during the final day of last year's village festival. Lindenfest kicks off Thursday, Aug. 11, at the village hall and U.S. Postal Service grounds on Sand Lake Road.

    Hit the summer party scene with Lindenfest

    Lindenhurst is about to throw its annual four-day party. As usual, Lindenfest will be on the village hall and U.S. Postal Service property at 2301 E. Sand Lake Road. It features bingo, a carnival, bands and the Miss Lindenhurst Pageant.

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    Sentencing delayed for reputed Chicago mobster

    There's a delay in the sentencing of an 87-year-old reputed mobster convicted in the bombing of a Chicago-area video poker company.

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    Kids can sell their stuff at Cary garage sale
    Kids, clean out your closets! Sell unwanted toys, games, books and other objects and make a few extra bucks at the Kids Garage Sale Saturday, Aug. 13, at Lions Park in Cary.

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    Make a toast during Downtown Elgin Pub Crawl
    Downtown Elgin Pub Crawl, which takes place Friday, Aug. 12, at Streets & Bars of Downtown Elgin, supports the continued revitalization of downtown Elgin.

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    Hannah Smith of Huntley recently was crowned Miss Illinois 2011.

    Huntley woman named Miss Illinois 2011
    On July 2, Hannah Smith of Huntley was crowned Miss Illinois 2011 by outgoing Miss Illinois 2010 Whitney Thorpe-Klinsky at the Marion Cultural and Civic Center in Marion, Ill.

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    The five semifinalists pose with Mario Tricoci. From left: Mercedes Janell Johnson; Juni Juhyun Park; Lynn Michelle Tatge; Tricoci; Alexandra Grace Cangelosi and Zachary Ross.

    Mt. Prospect teen a finalist in Tricoci modeling competition

    Lynn Michelle Tatge, a Mount Prospect resident, was selected as one of five finalists in the Mario Tricoci "Mario, Make Me A Model" competition and will endure a two-month training session before she walks the runway with professional models at the Fashion Focus Chicago show in October.

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    Deadline looms for Carpentersville ticket amnesty program

    If you received a ticket from Carpentersville police before July 1, you have less than a week to pay half the citation’s face value and get off the hook.On Aug. 15, the village’s one-time amnesty program expires and you’ll be stuck paying the full value of your tickets. As of Friday, the department had collected $16,998 from people who decided to take advantage of the program.

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    Northwest suburban police blotter

    Vandals poured two buckets of latex paint onto the basketball courts at Carefree Park in Arlington Heights around 10:15 a.m. Aug. 5. Vandals put handprints and footprints in the paint and used the paint to write obscenities. Damage was estimated at $1,500.

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    Northwest suburban police blotter

    Several semitractors and trailers were stolen in Elk Grove Village, including ones worth $32,500, $18,000, $5,000 and one with antique furniture valued at $8,000.

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    Bill Clinton, Stiller to co-chair Haiti benefit

    Former President Bill Clinton will be co-hosting a New York City gala to benefit The Stiller Foundation that's building schools in Haiti.

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    U.S. Rep. Joe Walsh, a McHenry Republican, has introduced balanced-budget legislation. His proposal caps spending as a percentage of the country's gross domestic product.

    Illinois proves an amendment doesn't guarantee balanced budget

    Illinois a state with one of the worst financial pictures in the country is among the states that already has in its constitution a provision intended to require balanced budgets. Kind of. “Illinois' is just flooded with loopholes and openings,” said U.S. Rep. Joe Walsh.

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    Chana Bernstein, left, opened the SARET Treasures of Hope gift shop in Glen Ellyn to benefit those in need of financial assistance, such as Jennifer Hamlin, who has been homeless for the past few months. But the store may have to close its doors because of declining business.

    Financial woes hit Glen Ellyn store that helps needy

    Declining sales are threatening a Glen Ellyn store that uses proceeds to benefit the less fortunate. "This summer has been a nightmare," says Chana Bernstein, president of the SARET Charitable Fund, which provides financial assistance to residents in need.

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    Tree-killing beetle extends range into NW Indiana

    A tree expert says he believes the infestation of a beetle that kills ash trees is widespread in northwestern Indiana.

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    2 children struck by taxi in Chicago

    Two children are recovering after being struck by a taxi as they crossed a street on Chicago's Magnificent Mile shopping district.

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    Pediatricians: Sports in heat OK with precautions

    Playing sports in hot, steamy weather is safe for healthy children and teen athletes, so long as precautions are taken and the drive to win doesn't trump common sense, the nation's largest pediatricians group says.

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    Family, friends remember fallen fighters as heroes

    One relied on his deep faith. Another was planning a marriage proposal. And yet another would shoot baskets with his mom when they had something serious to discuss.

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    Religious groups object to covering birth control

    They defied the bishops to support President Barack Obama's health care overhaul. Now Catholic hospitals are dismayed the law may force them to cover birth control free of charge to their employees.

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    Jack Daniel McCullough

    Prosecutor seeks reporters' notes in slaying case

    An Illinois prosecutor is seeking notes from two reporters who conducted jailhouse interviews with a man charged in the 1957 kidnapping and slaying of a 7-year-old Sycamore girl.

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    Forensic experts are in Milwaukee for conference

    About 1,000 forensic professionals from around the world will be in Milwaukee this week for an annual conference.

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    Peorians killed when motorcycle hit by SUV

    Two Peoria residents are dead after their motorcycle was struck by an SUV while stopped at a stop light.

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    Chicago students gear up to head back to school

    Many students in the nation's third-largest school district are heading back to school.

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    Ellis recalled as pioneer

    By Jingo! That's what Charles Everett Ellis might have said about a recent visit of several descendants to his old home town of Altamont.

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    Ice cream makers try to eat high ingredient costs

    The cost of the milk, butter fat and sugar that are key to Jim Capannari's ice cream have spiked this year, but he hasn't passed much of the cost along to customers.

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    Mom urges trio of fugitive siblings to surrender

    Three siblings from Florida are on the run from the FBI, accused of shooting at a police car during a high-speed chase and robbing a bank with assault weapons. A sheriff fears the crime spree could be the start of a "violent mission" and the mother of the fugitive trio is urging her two sons and daughter to give up before there's bloodshed.

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    A U.S. Marine tries to take cover, perched on a container, trying to shelter from the dust as a Chinook helicopter like the one shot down this weekend attempts a rescue.

    Probe continues at site of helicopter crash

    International military forces worked on Monday to recover every last piece of a Chinook helicopter that crashed over the weekend, killing 30 American troops, seven Afghan soldiers and an Afghan interpreter, NATO said.

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    Ceramic exhibit to open at CLC gallery

    “Thrown Altered: Vessels Out of Round,” an invitational exhibit of beautiful and interesting ceramic works by 14 artists will open on Friday, Aug. 19, at the Robert T. Wright Community Gallery of Art at the College of Lake County in Grayslake. An opening reception will be held from 7-9 p.m. Friday, Aug. 26, in the gallery. The event is free and open to the public and includes refreshments and...

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    A variety of artwork by Hanover Township seniors will be on display through August at the Senior Center, 240 S. Route 59, in Bartlett.

    Hanover Twp. seniors showcase art

    Hanover Township seniors will be showcasing their artwork in the “Got Art?” art show to run through the month of August. Most of the art on display was created in the Township’s art classes held at the Hanover Township Senior Center.

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    Ela Library to feature series on Louisa May Alcott

    The Ela Area Public Library will host a series of events in August celebrating the life, times and works of the popular classical literature author Louisa May Alcott. Geared for all ages, events and discussions are free and will be held at the library, 275 Mohawk Trail, Lake Zurich, unless noted. For information and to register visit www.eapl.org.

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    Dick Biondi memorabilia

    Barrington Rotary sock hop to feature Dick Biondi

    The Barrington Noon Rotary Club’s 2011 fundraiser – presented by Barrington Rotary Charities on Saturday, Sept. 17 – will feature a sock hop with nationally known disc jockey and legendary Chicago radio personality Dick Biondi.

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    The Schaumburg Township District Library will present “Pillars of Honor” from 1-4 p.m., Sunday, Aug. 14, in the Rasmussen Room, of the library, 130 S. Roselle Road, Schaumburg. The main event will be the unveiling of the original scale model of the WW II Memorial in Washington, D.C., which is pictured here.

    Schaumburg library to honor WW II veterans

    To honor the brave men and women who served during World War II, the Schaumburg Township District Library will present “Pillars of Honor” from 1-4 p.m., Sunday, Aug. 14, in the Rasmussen Room (second floor) of the library, 130 S. Roselle Road, Schaumburg.

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    Gordon and Connie Hankins of Naperville build tricycles for disabled children in their Naperville home.

    Naperville residents make three-wheel dreams come true.

    Gordon and Connie Hankins make dreams comes true for youngsters who especially need it. From their Naperville home, they build trycycles customized for kids with disabilities such as cerebral palsy and spina bifida.

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    Many residents of Carol Stream’s oldest part of town, including John Vent, had to move belongings from their flooded homes last summer. A year later, village officials say they’ve made improvements in how disaster response is handled.

    Carol Stream finally finding flood solutions

    After taking heat for a slow response to major flooding in the village, Carol Stream leaders are coming through with plans, including a buyout. “I love my neighborhood. If I could raise my street up 8 feet, I would love it even more,” said Nancy Barcelona, who's taking the deal.

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    Nick Bryzhenyuk, 5, of McHenry, wades in the water, with no luck, at the “Fishing should be fun” fishing derby held by the Competition Bassmasters of Northern Illinois at Round Lake Beach Park on Saturday.

    Images: The week in pictures
    This installment of the Week in Pictures photo gallery features images from around the Chicago suburbs including several county fairs.

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    Jim Renn, president of Lisle Savings Bank, offered a venue for summer ESL courses, catering to the growing Hispanic community.

    Small changes can be big deal to Hispanics

    A number of businesses and local organizations are reaching out to the county's growing Hispanic population. According to the 2010 census, close to 91,000 people in DuPage County speak mostly Spanish.

Sports

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    Closer Sergio Santos and catcher A.J. Pierzynski celebrate the White Sox’ fourth straight win Monday night.

    Pierzynski continues to deliver for Sox

    A.J. Pierzynski has been contributing for the White Sox all season long, and the veteran catcher came through again in Monday night's 7-6 win over the Orioles.

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    Woods still acting like the old Tiger in a new world

    Tiger Woods was as dismissive as ever Monday, another example of how much has changed in his world, and how little he realizes it — he is not the Tiger Woods he once was.

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    Northwestern quarterback Dan Persa

    Back from injury, Persa impresses in the Wildcats’ first practice

    In his first official practice since rupturing his right Achilles' tendon on Nov. 13, Northwestern QB Dan Persa looked, well, PersaStrong and his arm appeared to be as accurate as ever.

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    The Cubs’ Starlin Castro was named the National League player of the week for Aug. 1-7. During that time, Castro led the major leagues in hits (17), runs (10) and total bases (25). He also led the NL in batting average (.515) by going 17-for-33. Castro had an on-base percentage of .543 and a slugging percentage of .758 to go along with 7 RBI.

    Cubs’ Starlin Castro named NL player of the week

    Starlin Castro was named the NL player of the week, and manager Mike Quade says he's seen continued improvement in the young shortstop. The Cubs' game with the Washington Nationals Monday night was rained out.

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    Palatine pitcher Eric Scheuermann, scoring as a pinch runner against Hoffman Estates, made a verbal commitment Saturday to pitch for Bradley.

    Palatine baseball standout Eric Scheuermann commits to Bradley

    Palatine pitcher Eric Scheuermann made a verbal commitment to Bradley.

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    Benefit for ex-Hersey star Mark Leonhard

    An alumni baseball game will be held Aug. 20 to help the family of former Hersey three-sport star Mark Leonhard, who died May 25.

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    NI Lightning takes 4th at nationals

    The Northern Illinois Lightning 18U travel softball team ended the season this weekend by finishing higher than any team in Lightning history at an ASA Junior Olympic national tournament placing fourth at the ASA Northern Nationals in Overland Park, Kan.

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    Warren’s Nathan Boothe shoots over Normal Community’s Anthony Goodar during the Class 4A boys basketball state semifinal in Peoria.

    Toledo fits the plan for Warren’s Nathan Boothe

    An aspiring architect and Warren’s 6-foot-8 center of attention, Nathan Boothe was looking for a school that could meet his needs both in the classroom and on the basketball court. Last week, he decided that Toledo was that school.

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    Michigan wide receivers coach Jeff Hecklinski

    Hecklinski happy to be with Michigan

    Palatine's Jeff Hecklinski, a Parade All-American quarterback in 1992, started his college career in the Big Ten. Sixteen years after leaving the league, he's back as Michigan's wide receivers coach.

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    Sod story: Bears promise to be more vigilant

    Chairman of the board George McCaskey has been assured that the grass at Soldier Field will be playable for Saturday night’s preseason opener against the Bills after Friday’s scheduled practice was canceled because of unsafe conditions.

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    Bears offensive line coach Mike Tice likes what he has seen so far from his starting five going into Saturday’s preseason opener against the Buffalo Bills.

    Bears’ Tice evaluates his front five

    Bears offensive line coach Mike Tice provides an early scouting report on his five starters for Saturday's preseason opener.

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    Chicago Sky scouting report
    sky scout for tuesday

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    Former Minnesota Wild forward Andrew Brunette is excited about playing for the Blackhawks and his former coach in Phoenix, Joel Quenneville. Brunette is considered a crafty player in tight and should help establish a net-front presence on the Hawks power play.

    Brunette happy to be with Hawks

    The way new Blackhawks winger Andrew Brunette sees it, he can’t lose. If he doesn’t play on the first line with Jonathan Toews and Patrick Kane, there’s always a spot on the second line with Patrick Sharp and Marian Hossa. “It’s a tough gig, right?” Brunette joked.

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    New Chicago Blackhawks free agent signees Daniel Carcillo and Andrew Brunette pose with general manager Stan Bowman after being introduced at a news conference Monday.

    Carcillo ready to help Hawks punish Canucks

    New Blackhawks tough guy Daniel Carcillo is coming to town and saying all the right things - especially his dislike for the Vancouver Canucks.

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    NIU junior Tommy Davis is one of 50 players named to the 2011 Watch List for the Paul Hornung Award. The NIU speedster averages 24.0 yards per kickoff return last season and has scored a touchdown via kickoffs in each of his first two seasons at Northern Illinois.

    NIU’s Davis named to Hornung watch list

    NIU junior safety and return specialist Tommy Davis is one of 50 players named today to the 2011 Watch List for the Paul Hornung Award, which is given annually to the most versatile player in major college football.

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    Real Madrid's Cristiano Ronaldo, right, teammate Karim Benzema helped their club defeat Tianjin Teda 6-0 in their China tour on Saturday. Now a 7-year-old soccer prodigy from Argentina has signed to train with the elite club.

    Real Madrid signs 7-year-old soccer prodigy

    Real Madrid has signed a 7-year-old soccer prodigy from Argentina, Leonel Angel Coira, who wil begin training Sept. 6 with the Spanish club, a Madrid spokesman told The Associated Press on Monday.

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    Northwestern and coach Pat Fitzgerald will be the last stop on a 12-campus tour by the Big Ten Network crew as it prepares preview shows on each team for the 2011 football season. The crew will visit the Fighting Illini on Aug. 13 and NU on Aug. 22.

    Big Ten Football tour ready to hit the road

    For the fifth straight year, Dave Revsine, Gerry DiNardo and Howard Griffith will zigzag across Big Ten country to bring fans a 30-minute, on-site preview show from every Big Ten campus, traveling more than 3,000 miles, with a new stop in Lincoln, Neb., during the 15-day stretch.

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    Detroit Lions running back Mikel Leshoure, a former Big Ten football star for the Illini, will miss his rookie season in the NFL after tearing his Achilles tendon.

    Lions coach: injured Illini RB Leshoure to miss season

    Detoit Lions coach Jim Schwartz says running back Mikel Leshoure, a former star at Illinois, has a torn Achilles tendon and is out for the year. The rookie was injured during practice and was carted off the field after being attended to by trainers.

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    Westminster pitcher Elder commits to Arizona

    Senior Kevin Elder of Westminster Christian gave a verbal commitment Friday to pitch for the University of Arizona. Elder, who helped Westminster Christian win a Class 1A state title as a sophomore in 2010, finished his junior season with an ERA of 1.81 and a WHIP of 0.88 in 69? innings. The two-time Daily Herald All-Area pick struck out 132 and walked 26.

Business

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    Illinois Sen. Dick Durbin says he's never seen so much rancor in Washington but believes the downgrade of the nation's debt rating may be the jolt needed to spur bipartisan cooperation.

    Durbin: Debt rating should spur bipartisan action

    Illinois Sen. Dick Durbin says he's never seen so much rancor in Washington but believes the downgrade of the nation's debt rating may be the jolt needed to spur bipartisan cooperation.

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    A trader works on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange, in New York. Global stock markets .

    Dow plunges more than 600 points after downgrade

    Stocks plunged Monday as anxiety overtook investors on the first trading day since Standard & Poor's downgraded American debt.

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    Questions and answers about the market's turmoil

    Global stock markets tumbled Monday on the first trading day since Standard & Poor's downgraded long-term U.S. debt. The plunge came as investors grew anxious over a weakening U.S. economy and a widening debt crisis in Europe.

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    Treasury prices jump as stocks plummet

    Government bond prices are rising as a stock market rout is sending traders into assets considered safe.

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    IBM leaves U of I supercomputer project

    IBM Corp. is leaving a project at the University of Illinois to build the world's fastest supercomputer.

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    Obama: US to 'press on' despite deadly shoot down

    President Barack Obama says the United States will press ahead and succeed in Afghanistan despite this past weekend's deadly shoot down of a helicopter carrying U.S. and Afghan troops.

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    Chevron plans work at British Columbia refinery for October
    Chevron Corp. plans to begin a maintenance period at the Burnaby oil refinery in British Columbia in mid-October, according to a community newsletter issued by the company.The 51,890-barrel-a-day refinery will conduct safety inspections and refurbish “major furnaces” as part of the turnaround, the San Ramon, California-based company said in the newsletter.Ray Lord, a spokesman for the refinery based in Burnaby, declined to comment on the work. The company doesn’t provide specific details on turnarounds, he said in an e-mailed statement.The refinery processes crude oil from northern British Columbia and Alberta, which it receives through a 1,200- kilometer (746-mile) Kinder Morgan Energy Partners LP pipeline, according to Chevron’s website.

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    Gasoline crack rebounds

    European jet fuel premiums fell to the lowest level in more than six months as Glencore International Plc sold on the barge market.European gasoline’s premium to Brent crude, or crack, rebounded from a six-week low. Gasoil on the ICE Futures Europe exchange traded in backwardation for a second day.Light ProductsThe front-month gasoline crack rose for the first time in six days, rebounding to $6.01 a barrel as of 5:01 p.m. London time, according to PVM Oil Associates Ltd. data on Bloomberg. It fell to $5.70 a barrel earlier, the lowest level since June 27.Gasoline for immediate loading in northwest Europe traded from $980 to $982 a metric ton, according to a Bloomberg survey of traders and brokers monitoring the Argus Bulletin Board and the Platts pricing window. Deals for the Eurobob grade fuel, to which ethanol is added, were done from $967 to $997 a ton at the end of last week.Premium grade traded from $996 to $999 a ton. Barge lots are for no more than 5,000 tons.Jet fuel barges traded at a premium of $74 to August gasoil on ICE, the survey showed. That compares with an $80 premium on Aug. 4 and marks the lowest level since Jan. 21.Morgan Stanley was today’s only buyer on the barge market, the survey showed.Gasoil for August delivery dropped $12.25, or 1.3 percent, to $900.25 a ton on ICE as of 4:52 p.m. local time. That contract traded at 50 cents more than September, keeping the market in backwardation.Futures are described as being in backwardation when the contract closest to expiry costs more than later-dated contracts. This structure usually signals rising demand or reduced supply. The opposite structure is known as contango.Long, or bullish managed-money bets on gasoil futures and options were at 63,745 contracts last week, according to ICE data published today on its website. That’s up 13 percent from last week.Diesel barges traded at premiums from $23 to $25 to August ICE futures, the survey showed. That’s little changed on last week. Gasoil barges were also steady, with one deal done at a discount of $1.50 to the August contract.ResiduesLow-sulfur fuel oil, used to power ships and generate electricity, traded from $632 to $648 a ton, the survey showed. High-sulfur fuel oil, a shipping fuel, traded from $611 to $612 a ton.

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    Sirius XM subscriber hearing ends without decision on accord
    Bloomberg NewsA federal judge declined to rule from the bench on the settlement of a lawsuit by Sirius XM Radio Inc. subscribers who claimed the satellite radio broadcaster broke the law when it raised prices after merging with its only rival.U.S. Judge Harold Baer in Manhattan reserved a decision on the accord after subscribers argued at a hearing today that the agreement gives them too little and the lawyers too much.Subscriber Carl Blessing of Florida sued Sirius XM in 2009, claiming it violated federal antitrust and state consumer- protection laws when it raised prices and levied a music royalty fee after Sirius Satellite Radio and XM Satellite Radio completed their merger in 2008.“Since the merger, Sirius XM has abused its monopoly power by increasing prices above competitive levels, breaching subscriber contracts and making false and misleading statements to subscribers and the public,” Blessing said in his complaint. He said his monthly rate jumped 40 percent to $27.88 after the merger.The subscribers said New York-based Sirius XM broke promises it made to win approval of the merger from the U.S. Federal Communications Commission and Justice Department. Sirius XM said the increases were imposed to cover higher costs.Baer in March let the federal antitrust claim proceed as a class action, or group lawsuit, on behalf of Sirius XM subscribers from July 29, 2008, to July 5, 2011. He denied class-action status on the state-law claims.Preliminary ApprovalThe class and Sirius XM reached a pretrial settlement, and Baer gave preliminary approval to the agreement in May.The accord, valued at $180 million, provides that prices for basic service and Internet access, as well as the music royalty fee, will remain at current levels through the end of the year. Subscribers who canceled can reconnect without paying a fee. Those whose plans expire after Dec. 31 can renew before that time at current rates. Subscribers will get no cash.Objectors called the settlement of “dubious value” because Sirius XM hadn’t ever said it would raise prices before year-end anyway. They objected to the $13 million in fees to be paid to the lawyers representing the class.Sirius dropped 16 cents, or 8.5 percent, to $1.73 at 12:33 p.m. in Nasdaq Stock Market trading. The shares rose 16 percent this year before today. The company said it had 21 million subscribers as of June 30, 8 percent more than the previous year.Commercial-Free MusicSirius XM provides 135 channels of commercial-free music as well as talk shows featuring Howard Stern and Martha Stewart, which carry advertisements, and professional sports.The basic monthly charge is $12.99. Sirius XM increased the rate a subscriber paid to get service on an additional radio to $8.99 a month from $6.99. The class also attacked a $2.99 charge for Internet access, which had been free. The music charge, assessed after new royalty rates with record companies were set, amounted to $1.98 a month.The case is Blessing v. Sirius XM Radio, 1:09-cv-10035, U.S. District Court, Southern District of New York (Manhattan).

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    General Maritime leads slump as U.S. oil-tanker stocks plunge
    Bloomberg NewsGeneral Maritime Corp. led declines by oil-tanker stocks in New York as the threat of a second U.S. recession in three years increased the risk energy imports into the world’s largest economy may fall.General Maritime fell as much as 32 percent in New York Stock Exchange trading and was down 23 percent at 57 cents as of 12:18 p.m. local time. The six-member Bloomberg Tanker Index fell as much as 8.1 percent, the most since May 2010, to the lowest level in more than eight years.“The stock market is discounting problems ahead,” Andreas Vergottis, research director at Tufton Oceanic Ltd., manager of the world’s biggest shipping hedge fund, said by phone. “It will be very bad for tankers.”The U.S. economy is heading into a “double-dip” recession, Nouriel Roubini, the co-founder and chairman of New York-based Roubini Global Economics LLC, said in an interview on Bloomberg Television.Tanker shares retreated as equities slumped globally. The Standard & Poor’s 500 Index was last down 3.8 percent to 1,153.47, its lowest level since October. The MSCI World Index slid 3.5 percent, extending its drop from this year’s high to 18 percent.A return to recession in the U.S. would delay any rebound in charter rates for tankers until after 2013, said Jonathan Chappell, an analyst at Evercore Partners Inc. in New York. Hire costs for very large crude carriers, each able to haul 2 million barrels of oil, are at the lowest level in 10 years, according to the analyst.34% Decline“What this could do is delay the recovery out further,” Chappell said.Hire costs on the industry’s benchmark Saudi Arabia-to- Japan route fell 1.7 percent to 46.09 industry-standard Worldscale points today, according to the Baltic Exchange in London. The decline was the 12th in a row. Rental rates are down 34 percent this year.Seaborne shipments of oil into the U.S. were forecast to reach 6.9 million barrels a day, or 17 percent of all crude shipped this year, an 11-year low, according to Clarkson Research Services Ltd., a unit of the world’s largest shipbroker. The country is the world’s biggest oil importer.Owners are facing a glut of ships after ordering the most in almost three decades in 2007 and 2008 before the world economy entered its worst recession since World War II. Supply and demand in the tanker market probably would only return to balance later than 2013 if demand were to weaken further, Chappell said.Negative RatesAverage quarterly rates for VLCCs carrying crude to the U.S. from the Middle East have been unprofitable since October, according to data from the exchange. It assesses freight costs on more than 50 international maritime routes.Unprofitable, or negative, rates mean tanker owners effectively are paying some of charterers’ costs because agreed daily hire rates fail to cover all fuel and operating expenses for a journey.Tankers will ship an estimated 40.9 million barrels of crude oil, Clarkson said.“Trade will slow down, and I wouldn’t be surprised if we see negative growth,” Tufton’s Vergottis said.

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    ClimateCare buys itself out from JMorgan

    Emissions offset developer ClimateCare said it has been taken private in a management buyout from JPMorgan Chase & Co. as it seeks to expand investment in the United Nations carbon offset market.ClimateCare, founded in 1997 to invest in greenhouse gas emission-reduction projects, has been bought back by the management and is an independent entity as of today, Edward Hanrahan, an executive director of the company, said by telephone and e-mail from Oxford, England. He declined to disclose the price paid. JPMorgan bought the company in 2008, a year before its purchase of EcoSecurities, an offset buyer.The company has sold offsets to companies including German utility EON AG, electronics maker Panasonic Corp. and vehicle manufacturer Land Rover as well as to Britain’s political parties and The Elders, a group of global leaders that include Desmond Tutu and Nelson Mandela.ClimateCare specializes in emissions-cutting projects that also enhance sustainable development, focusing on Sub-Saharan Africa, Hanrahan said. These include fuel-efficient stoves and clean-water filters. Such projects create credits that can either be used by companies wishing to voluntarily reduce their carbon footprint, or by those wishing to comply with emissions trading systems such as the European Union’s market and the United Nations’ Clean Development Mechanism, or CDM.“Moving forward we’ll be doing much more CDM project development,” Hanrahan said. “We have a large pipeline of projects which we’re working on at the moment both in the voluntary market and CDM. We’re working with a number of partners to develop some new projects as well.”

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    BofA weights potential responses to counter Fannie Mae

    Bank of America Corp. said it is weighing how to counter Fannie Mae’s more aggressive demands that the bank repurchase faulty mortgages as Chief Executive Officer Brian T. Moynihan seeks to reverse a share slide.“We are considering a number of potential responses to this changed behavior,” the Charlotte, North Carolina-based lender said in a memo distributed to employees and dated Aug. 7. “It is unknown whether Fannie Mae’s continuing claims will result in increased representation and warranty liability.”Bank of America, the largest U.S. lender by assets, is seeking to assure staff and investors that the company can withstand investor demands for compensation on soured loans. American International Group Inc. today sued the bank to recover more than $10 billion in losses on mortgages, and government sponsored enterprises including Fannie Mae have been demanding more reimbursement following a $3 billion deal in January.“Fannie Mae has modified its approach to repurchase claims, including claims on loans where over two years’ worth of payments have been made in a way that diverges from our longstanding course of dealing with them,” according to the memo. “We believe, however, that we have properly accrued for all GSE representation and warranty exposure taking into consideration this changed behavior to date.”Bank of America dropped $1.16, or 14 percent, to $7.01 at 12:18 p.m. in New York Stock Exchange composite trading. The company has slumped by almost half this year.

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    Berkshire among insurers that may be lowered in S&P review

    Warren Buffett’s Berkshire Hathaway Inc. is among firms that may be downgraded by Standard & Poor’s as the ratings company reviews insurers after stripping the U.S. government of its AAA rating.“Our view of these companies’ fundamental credit characteristics has not changed,” S&P said in a statement today as it cut the outlook to “negative” on Omaha, Nebraska-based Berkshire. “Rather, the rating actions reflect the application of criteria and our view that the link between the ratings on these entities and the sovereign credit ratings on the U.S. could lead to a decline in the insurers’ financial strength.”New York Life Insurance Co., the largest policyholder-owned life insurer in the U.S., was among five firms today stripped of AAA ratings and cut to AA+. Berkshire was among five other companies that had the outlook lowered on their AA+ grades.“The 10 affected insurance groups operate in the U.S. and generally have significant holdings of U.S. Treasury and agency securities,” S&P said.Buffett lost his AAA rating from S&P last year after agreeing to buy railroad Burlington Northern Santa Fe. He said Aug. 6 that the ratings firm erred in cutting the U.S. grade and that the country should have a “quadruple A” rating. Buffett didn’t immediately respond to a request for comment left with an assistant.

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    Chile estimates copper output to reach 7.2 million tons

    Chile probably will increase annual copper production to about 7.2 million metric tons by 2020 on total planned investments of $67 billion, Mining Minister Hernan De Solminihac told reporters today.To contact the editor responsible for this story: James Attwood at

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    Morgan Stanley: US debt rating drop poses risk

    Standard & Poor's downgrade of U.S. debt could end up hurting Morgan Stanley's business should the lower debt rating further erode confidence in the financial markets and economy, the investment bank said in a regulatory filing on Monday.

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    President Barack Obama speaks in the State Dining Room of the White House in Washington, Monday, Aug. 8, 2011.

    Obama calls US AAA nation despite AA+ Rating

    President Barack Obama on Monday essentially dismissed the first-ever downgrade of the U.S. credit rating, trying to reassure investors and the public that the nation's leaders need only show more "common sense and compromise" to tame a staggering accumulation of debt.

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    Ed. Sec'y: States to get waivers on No Child tests

    The Obama administration has unveiled plans to give school districts a break from the stringent testing mandates in the No Child Left Behind Law, as long as they pursue other reform efforts.

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    Germany still opposes larger rescue fund
    FRANKFURT, Germany — Germany says it remains opposed to increasing the size of the eurozone’s bailout fund for troubled governments.The German stance could limit the European Financial Stabilty Fund’s ability to prop up government bonds and bail out troubled countries.Germany Finance Ministry Christoph Steegmans said the fund “will remain what it is.”Economists say the 440 billion euro fund is too small to rescue financially troubled Italy if that becomes necessary.It could also limit the fund’s ability to support Italian and Spanish bonds when it receives those powers later this year.

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    Hospira announces approval of new injection

    Lake Forest-based Hospira Inc. announced it gained approval from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for a new injection.

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    ECB pledge gets Spain, Italy rates down

    FRANKFURT, Germany — A risky European Central Bank decision to fight the continent’s debt crisis by buying Spanish and Italian bonds on Monday started pushing down the soaring interest rates threatening those countries with financial disaster.But some analysts cautioned that buying up the bonds of deeply indebted governments transfers significant risk to the balance sheet of an institution long reluctant to move beyond its traditional role controlling inflation.Others warned that ECB reluctance to engage in the program risked a halfway effort that would led rates rise again disastrously. Bond yields and prices move in opposite directions; when purchases drive up the price, that reduces the interest rate countries would face if they issued new bonds. The ECB has been reluctant to become directly involved in averting the crisis, instead pushing politicians to get their countries’ finances under control and give the (euro) 440 billion eurzone rescue fund the power to buy government bonds on the open markets.But a recent spike in investor concern about Italy and Spain’s high debt levels and lackluster economic growth caught the 17-country eurozone just as parliaments broke up for the summer recess, delaying the crucial changes to the bailout fund known as the European Financial Stability Facility.Most governments say they won’t be able to approve the expansion of the fund before September.“For a democratic process with such heavy stakes, we cannot go any faster,” French Finance Minister Francois Baroin said on Europe-1 radio.Left as the last line of defense, the ECB decided late Sunday decided to “actively implement” its bond-buying program, a crisis tool that it had so far not used for Italy and Spain.The radical expansion of the ECB’s bond-buying program cements the bank’s unwilling role as the institution with primary responsibility for solving’s Europe 21-month-old financial crisis.But some economists said the risk of Spanish and Italian default could soon return if the ECB hands off bond-buying to the EFSF, whose resources are fixed by eurozone leaders while the bank’s are, in theory, unlimted. Analysts at the Royal Bank of Scotland said they expected the central bank to buy an average of (euro) 2.5 billion worth of Spanish and Italian bonds each day, equivalent to (euro) 600 billion a year.Analysts at Royal Bank of Scotland said the bank could wind up purchasing (euro) 850 billion ($1.2 trillion) of Spanish and Italian debt.“You need somebody who is known to have unlimited firepower, and that’s what the ECB has,” said Paul De Grauwe, an economist at the Catholic University of Leuven. “There is no limit to the amount that the ECB can intervene. And once people see the central bank is ready to do this, they won’t need to do it. It’s an insurance mechanism.”Economist Michael Schubert at Commerzbank thinks however that the bank would make purchases only until the EFSF was ready. He said the bank not only risked losses on the bonds, but its reputation as an inflation fighting monetary authority.“If people do not believe or are convinced that the ECB is only responsible for monetary policy, but is in effect supporting governments, then this could be a severe loss in reputation and the consequences would be that inflation expecations would go up.”Another analysts said the program falls short of contentious, long-term solutions such as issuing a joint eurobond, whereby the eurozone as a whole would borrow money in the markets. The problem for Germany is that it would pay higher interest rates under such a scheme.A more drastic step, and controversial, step would be joint control over budgets.

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    Airlines begin rolling back fare hikes

    DALLAS U.S. airlines have started rolling back last month’s fare increases, so passengers are likely to pay the same prices even though federal ticket taxes are being collected again.Southwest Airlines Co., its AirTran Airways subsidiary and Delta Air Lines Inc. said they cut fares back to where they were before July 23, when the taxes expired.Industry observers said they expected other airlines to do the same, but by midday Monday United, Continental and US Airways said they were still charging the higher prices. American Airlines and JetBlue Airways officials said they had lowered fares on some routes — likely those where they compete with Southwest.On the airlines that rolled back fares, consumers were paying the same total price as before this weekend instead of seeing increases of 7.5 percent or more for travel within the U.S.Most U.S. airlines raised fares last month after a standoff between Republicans and Democrats in Congress on funding for the Federal Aviation Administration caused federal excise taxes on tickets to expire. In effect, the airlines grabbed the money that previously went to the government instead of passing the tax break to consumers.By raising fares to offset the expired taxes, airlines were able to pocket an estimated $400 million in just two weeks.Last week Congress revived the taxes through Sept. 16. Rick Seaney, CEO of FareCompare.com, said Southwest and AirTran started rolling back the July fare increases on Sunday night and he expected other airlines to quickly do the same. Delta said it matched Southwest on Monday morning.Tom Parsons, CEO of Bestfares.com, said the weak economy and stock market turmoil could force airlines to do more than just cancel last month’s fare hike.“They have to be concerned over (travel demand in) the fall,” he said. “They may still have to bring fares down further.”

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    Traders work on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange.(AP Photo/Jin Lee)

    S&P downgrades Fannie and Freddie, U.S.-backed debt

    Standard & Poor's Ratings Services on Monday downgraded the credit ratings of Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac and other agencies linked to long-term U.S. debt.

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    Government documents subpoenaed in Boeing case

    The chairman of the House Oversight committee has subpoenaed documents from the National Labor Relations Board relating to its lawsuit against Boeing Co.

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    Michelle Sarwas

    Bartlett woman turns class project, passion into business

    A Bartlett woman turned an MBA project into a business caring for dogs. Michelle Sarwas left her position in corporate finance and turned the classroom project into a reality. Find out how the entrepreneur operates a doggy day care.

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    Translators convey class messages between Mandarin and Cantonese during a management training class at the McDonald's Corp. Hamburger University in Shanghai, China. McDonald's has 1,300 stores in China and aims to have 2,000 by 2013.

    McDonald's July sales in China rises 5.1%

    McDonald's Corp., the world's largest restaurant chain, said sales at stores open at least 13 months rose 5.1 percent in July as Chinese consumers dined out more.

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    Oil dives under $85 after S&P downgrades U.S. debt

    Oil prices dived below $85 a barrel Monday in Asia after Standard & Poor's lowered the U.S. credit rating — a blow to confidence that could hurt economic growth and demand for crude.

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    Sandeep Singh, deputy managing director at Toyota Kirloskar Motor Private, says growth in India has been solid for Toyota

    Toyota hopes for revival after sinking to No. 3

    Toyota Motor Corp., which has sunk to No. 3 in global vehicle sales from pole position, is counting on emerging markets to drive a revival in its fortunes, one of its top India executives says.

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    The Nosek family includes son Jude, director of marketing, and, from left, father Ron, chairman; Evelyn, family matriarch; son Aaron, president; and nephew Dave, human resources manager. The photo in the center is Keson company founder Roy Nosek.

    Aurora company makes mark saving lives in Afghanistan

    The Nosek family behind Keson Industries didn’t think that starting the business in their home in Berwyn more than 40 years ago would one day save the lives of our troops in Afghanistan in the 21st century. But chalk has a way of doing that.

Life & Entertainment

  •  
    “Nevermind,” the album that turned Kurt Cobain and Nirvana into superstars, will get a 20th anniversary reissue in the fall.

    'Nevermind,' 'Achtung' turn 20

    Can you believe "Nevermind" is just about 20 years old? Anniversary editions of Nirvana's album -- and U2's "Achtung Baby" -- are being lavishly reissued. Birthday cake not included.

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    Chicago names street 'Buddy Guy Way'

    Chicago blues great Buddy Guy now has his own street. The city of Chicago has renamed the stretch of Wabash Street in front of his club, Legends, "Buddy Guy Way."

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    Felicity Huffman says she is sad that the saucy soap opera "Desperate Housewives" would be ending after eight seasons. But she's also exhilarated by potential story lines in the show's home stretch.

    Huffman: Sad but psyched by 'Housewives' ending

    Never underestimate Wisteria Lane's grapevine.On Sunday, ABC officially confirmed reports that the upcoming season of "Desperate Housewives" would be its last.But series star Felicity Huffman got the bad news on Friday — in an e-mail from her co-star Marcia Cross.

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    Sleep specialists recommend a consistent schedule for going to bed.

    Catching up on those Z's

    Whether or not science ultimately proves that lack of sleep contributes to being overweight, most of us could benefit from catching more Z's. Sleep disorders specialist Michael Breus suggests these simple steps to sounder sleep.

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    Selena Gomez, center, accepts her award onstage at the Teen Choice Awards on Sunday.

    Selena Gomez, Justin Bieber win Teen Choice Awards

    Selena Gomez conjured five wins at the Teen Choice Awards — one more than boyfriend Justin Bieber. The star of "Wizards of Waverly Place" was selected as choice TV actress, female hottie and music group with her band The Scene. Gomez and her ensemble were also awarded the choice single trophy for "Who Says" and love song for "Love You Like a Love Song," which the 19-year-old actress-singer performed at Sunday's freewheeling fan-favorite ceremony.

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    Ruby Sangria
    Ruby Red Sangria

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    Her family suspects her fiance is gay

    Carolyn Hax counsels a woman whose family suspects that her fiance may be gay.

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    U.S. singer and rapper Kanye West ranted during a performance at the Big Chill music festival Saturday.

    Kanye West says people look at him 'like Hitler'

    Kanye West says he feels like people look at him like Hitler. The 34-year-old rapper known for his outbursts was the headline act at the Big Chill music festival Saturday night, where he ranted in the middle of his set about being misunderstood and underappreciated.

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    A regular routine of moderate exercise can have a significant impact on health and how a body ages, experts say.

    What are the secrets to aging well?

    I have always assumed that my husband benefits from especially good genes. But now that Jim is in his 60s, people aren't just shocked to learn his age, they also want to know how he does it. It has made me wonder if the real reason he's aging so well is the nutrition-exercise-supplement-skin-care-lifestyle regimen he has created for himself.

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    Getting a consistent good night's rest may help your waistline in the long run.

    Less sleep may mean more weight

    Getting too little sleep can have all kinds of negative consequences, including making you cranky and impairing your driving. A growing body of evidence suggests another possibility: making you fat. That intriguing prospect has researchers busily conducting studies on the potential relationship between shut-eye and BMI.

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    1970 Pontiac GTO Judge convertible

    Classic recollections: 1970 Pontiac GTO

    After returning home from his tour of duty in Vietnam, war veteran Vic Alesi was more than ready to trade in his machines of firepower for one packing plenty of horsepower. What caught his eye was the latest muscled offering from Pontiac.

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    Create a healthy diet for hungry adolescents

    With activity from sports and seemingly constant growth spurts, proper nutrition is as important as ever during adolescent years. As a general rule, try to give your kids as much food variety as possible. This ensures a wide array of nutrients and minimizes their chances of getting burned out on a particular food.

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    Your health: Too much multitasking?
    From the playground kid who can pat his head and rub his belly at the same time to the grown-up who can simultaneously text, tweet and tag vacation photos in Facebook while slaying digital orcs in a separate Web browser window, modern society smiles on those who can multi-task. It’s a sign of mental acuity. Or is it?

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    New HIV infections in U.S. hold steady

    The number of Americans newly infected with the AIDS virus each year has been holding steady at about 50,000, according to a new government report. But a U.S. health official said just keeping the number stable was unacceptable, noting a dramatic increase in new HIV cases among young gay and bisexual black men.

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    Gallstone symptoms require further investigation

    I am a 71-year-old female. I have been nauseated for about 10 weeks. It started with just nausea, went to being unable to eat, then to where I cannot stand the smell of foods cooking, especially greasy foods. About two weeks ago I went to my primary care physician. The results seem to show gallstones.

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    The number of men getting Botox injections and cosmetic surgery is increasing, experts say.

    More men turning to Botox

    Danny Paranik, 64, a personal trainer and tennis instructor from Carnegie, Pa., works out with weights, watches his diet and competes regularly in tennis tournaments. So when he began to notice wrinkles in his face, Botox was the natural choice. “I was feeling very good inside, but my outside wasn't matching my inside,” he said.

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    Camden Linstead, left, and his half-brother Christopher Lance will be trekking across England to raise awareness for the gene CDH1 and how it can lead to stomach cancer.

    25-year-old gives up stomach to avoid cancer

    To avoid developing stomach cancer, Camden took drastic measures: He had doctors surgically remove his stomach. Now the 25-year-old is looking to raise money for others like him by walking a 220-mile, 14-day path from coast to coast in England with his uncle — who also is without a stomach — and half brother, Christopher Lance, 16.

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    Research on vitamin benefits continues

    Do vitamins actually decrease the risk of illness? This is a question that has been asked for decades. On one end of the spectrum there are those who say that if you have a healthy diet, you don’t need any vitamins. On the other end, are those who megadose vitamins on a daily basis. The answer is probably somewhere in the middle.

Discuss

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    Let's solve our hunger challenge now

    Are you or your children hungry? Hunger in the suburbs is a growing problem, nearly doubling in the region in the past five years, state data show. If you need help, don't be embarrassed to ask for it, a Daily Herald editorial urges. If you can give help, don't put off offering it.

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    Manufacturing knows no bounds
    There are hundreds of examples of MEPs providing technical assistance to manufactures in other states, developing ways to improve supply chain competitiveness and opening doors for companies to do business with each other.

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    Debt agreement ‘solved’ the wrong problem

    The debt-ceiling fight generated enough hyperventilation and heartburn to replace a coal-fired power plant. The resulting product? It’s starting to look kind of puny and irrelevant.The political outcome was awful. But leaving politics aside for a moment, I’m confident that budget cuts totaling less than $1 trillion over 10 years will not meaningfully alter life as we know it. And since the legislation produces absolutely no new revenue, the impact on the national debt is minimal.About $1.5 trillion in additional cuts would be imposed if the “super-committee,” a bipartisan congressional panel charged with reshaping our future through entitlement and tax reform, should reach an impasse. Hey, when has (BEG ITAL) that (END ITAL) ever happened? Still, with the exception of Pentagon spending, sacred cows are pretty much exempt from the automatic cuts. The impact on the debt would barely rise to underwhelming.We’ve just spent months of bitter struggle to accomplish remarkably little. Meanwhile, most of the world’s advanced economies, including ours, are mired in an economic “recovery” that is proceeding so slowly it feels as if we’re moving backward.Earth to Washington: Unemployment is stuck around 9 percent. Businesses aren’t hiring because consumer demand, normally the great engine of the U.S. economy, is feeble. Americans are saving rather than spending because their most valuable assets — their homes — have not begun to regain the value they lost when the housing bubble went splat. Housing prices can’t begin to recover until the glut of foreclosures is digested by what’s left of the real estate market. Those foreclosed homes can’t be bought by the unemployed.Our elected officials could and should be talking about ways to break this vicious cycle before it drags us back into recession. Instead, they have focused on debt reduction — a laudable goal that is being pursued in the wrong way at the wrong moment.Yes, we do have to reduce the debt. But the time to do that is when the economy is strong enough to withstand the blows of an austerity program. Healthy economic growth would shrink the debt problem over time, even without draconian belt-tightening. Producing this kind of growth should be the nation’s top priority.All the brinkmanship over a possible default did essentially nothing to discourage investors from buying Treasury bills; interest rates remain low, and many economists now say there would be no impact even if the ratings agencies were to downgrade the United States as an investment. This is because no one — except, perhaps, some tea party types and Rand Paul — believed it was possible that our government would actually fail to pay its obligations. Also, because there’s no other safe harbor in which all that money can be stashed.Our debt “crisis” is a piffle compared to what’s happening in Europe, where dire concern about possible default has spread to Spain and Italy. Unlike Greece, these economic giants might be too big to bail out. Russian strongman Vladimir Putin keeps demanding a replacement for the dollar as the world’s leading reserve currency. At the moment, I wouldn’t place much of a bet on the euro.In Washington, our leaders seem to have barely noticed this turmoil in one of the world’s most important economic zones. They were busy in a philosophical debate over the difference between eliminating a “tax expenditure” and raising a tax. Hint: To the taxpayer, there’s not really a difference at all.Congress and the president should have been extending unemployment benefits and the payroll tax holiday — two measures that would help keep the economy moving forward, however slowly. And they should at least try to do more than crane their necks at the ongoing disaster in real estate.

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    Three stages to U.S. budget solution

    Columnist Charles Krauthammer: Conventional wisdom holds that the congressional super-committee established by the debt-ceiling deal to propose further deficit reduction will go nowhere. I’m not so sure. There is a grand compromise to be had. It does, however, require precise sequencing.

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    Impressed with offerings at Arlington Hts. library
    Letter to the editor: The executive director of the Arlington Heights Memorial Library gave a well-received presentation recently at the Arlinton Hts. Senior Center.

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    Rainbow Falls staff dedicated to safety, cleanliness
    Letter to the editor: As an Elk Grove resident and a four-year employee of Rainbow Falls, I can confidently state the village of Elk Grove takes great pride in their park district; especially the Rainbow Falls Water Park facility.

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    Throwing money at flooding hasn’t helped, so far
    Letter to the editor: Ken Kitzing of Mt. Prospect writes that he's lived here since the 1950s, and all the taxes that have been levied to help solve basement flooding in town haven't helped, at least so far.

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    Dist. 57 an asset for all of Mt. Prospect
    Letter to the editor: Michael Berry, presidentMount Prospect District 57 school board, writes that people who are opposed to any tax increases for the schools should look carefully at the big picture.

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    Here’s how sirens work in Palatine
    Letter to the editor: Tom Smith, coordinator of Palatine Emergency Management, explains why the sirens were not sounded during the last big storm.

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    One idea to improve Randhurst parking
    Letter to the editor: I applaud the developers of the new Randhurst site. It looks great, they have some great stores in there now and new restaurants. The new theatre is amazing.  However, the parking maze that they designed leaves a lot to be desired.

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    Mt. Prospect shows its generosity at July 4th parade
    Letter to the editor: On behalf of the members of St. Mark Lutheran Church and St. Raymond Catholic Church, both of Mount Prospect, we would like to express our sincere gratitude to the residents of Mount Prospect for their generous response to our collection of food and cash donations with our shopping cart brigade during the July 4 parade in Mount Prospect.

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    Irritated by early morning ‘courtesy call’ during storm
    Letter to the editor: When his phone rang at 4 a.m. on July 23, Larry Schuetz thought something terrible had happened. Instead, it was a recorded courtesy call from Rolling Meadows, telling him that roads around town were flooded and to be careful if he ventured out.

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    Civil union law is attack on religion
    State Rep. Greg Harris, sponsor of the civil unions law, claims that religious vendors like Catholic Charities cannot discriminate because of sexual orientation. Yet Harris neglects to acknowledge that Illinois’ anti-discrimination law also prohibits discrimination on the basis of religion.

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    More information needed on tollway plan
    A Grayslake letter to the editor: I recently voted no on the resolution for an 87.5 percent toll increase. This may be an easy and quick answer to our maintenance and expansion issues, but it is not the best answer.

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    Healthy food getting hard to find, afford
    We should stop using taxpayer dollars to subsidize unhealthy foods that have resulted in the rate of childhood obesity quadrupling over the last 40 years.

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