New DH calendar

Daily Archive : Tuesday August 2, 2011

News

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    The home of Timothy E. Levis on the 600 block of Wellington Avenue in Elgin who attempted to set fire to the porch after it was red tagged for unsanitary conditions.

    Elgin man torches own red-tagged home, police say

    Timothy E. Levis, 62, of Elgin faces charges of trying to burn down his own house with a Molotov cocktail. Authorities say his house was red-tagged days earlier for unsanitary conditions.

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    2-year-old drowns in Aurora backyard pool

    A 2-year-old girl drowned early Tuesday in an aboveground back yard swimming pool of an Aurora home where seven children were being cared for by a woman who was not a licensed day-care operator, police said. "I saw Abby when she was still in her mom's tummy, and it's really quite terrifying and sad that something like that would happen to her," the girl's neighbor Kristine Beckemeier said.

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    Edward Bachner

    Lake in the Hills man pleads guilty in puffer fish toxin case

    Edward Bachner, 38, of Lake in the Hills, pleaded guilty Tuesday to charges that he acquired lethal puffer fish toxin in what authorities said was a scheme to kill his wife. He also pleaded guilty to wire fraud related to purchasing a $20 million life insurance policy on his wife, Rebecca, and to filing a fraudulent $111,000 federal tax return for 2005.

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    Geneva Hardware closed Monday after more than 80 years in business.

    Geneva Hardware closes with little notice to customers

    Geneva Hardware store closed abruptly Monday, puzzling customers. “We regret to inform you that our store is closed,” according to signs placed on the entrances of the store at 2063 Lincoln Hwy. in St. Charles. The store moved into the former Dominick's grocery store location in February 2011.

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    Ford Motor Co. said Tuesday its U.S. sales rose 6 percent in July, boosted by small cars and SUVs.

    U.S. auto industry uneasy after weak July sales

    Analysts predicted only a slight rise in U.S. sales of new cars and trucks for July. A lack of discounts and continuing shortages of Japanese cars kept many buyers away, causing sales to sputter for the third straight month. Americans also worried about the weakening economy.

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    Lightning bolt sparks Naperville roof fire

    A lightning strike during Tuesday night's storms sparked a Naperville roof fire that left a home uninhabitable and caused an estimated $150,000 im damages.

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    Man arrested at Walmart on videotaping charge

    Cook County prosecutors dropped charges of misdemeanor unlawful videotaping against a 46-year-old Arlington Heights man who police said took photos of a woman at a Mount Prospect retail store.

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    Dominic Calabres, 15, left, competes against Michael Lurz, 17, both from Barrington, during a watermelon eating contest at National Night Out at Citizen Park in Barrington. The police and fire department provided driving courses to simulate drunken driving and texting while driving. Music, food and other entertainment were also provided.

    Images: National Night Out in the suburbs
    Tuesday evening marked the 28th Annual National Night Out. The event taking place in many or our suburban towns is designed to highlight law enforcement programs that raise awareness about crime prevention programs.

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    Wayne Wallar, with his wife, Fran, discusses the latest charges against Michael Whitney, convicted of the fatal stabbing Wayne’s father, Cecil, in 1982.

    Victim’s son has no sympathy for ‘monster’

    The son of one of Michael Whitney's past victims says the man is a monster and deserves to be kept in jail forever. He probably will get his wish now that the 58-year-old has been charged with a 1976 murder, charges announced on Tuesday.

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    Michael W. Whitney

    Prosecutors detail 1976 Wheaton murder

    A man already serving time for murder was charged Tuesday with the 1976 rape and slaying of Wheaton resident Darlene Stack. Michael W. Whitney, 58, is accused of stabbing Stack 33 times two days after she moved into a neioghboring apartment. “She only lived there a few days until the defendant brutally raped and murdered her,” said prosecutor Joe Ruggiero.

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    Chain O’ Lakes blight is gardeners’ boon

    Nutrient rich sediment that can hinder boating in the Chain O’ Lakes will become a boon for community gardeners in two west suburbs. About 500 cubic yards — the equivalent of about 50 typical dump truck loads — dredged from waterways in northern Lake County will be used to create a series of urban gardens in Broadview and Maywood.

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    State Rep. Carol Sente left and the family of Zach Tran watch as Gov. Pat Quinn signs “Zach's Law” Tuesday at the Waukegan SportsPark. Zach was 6 when he died after a soccer goal fell on him. The new law requires youth soccer leagues enact measures to prevent similar tragedies.

    Boy's memory lives on through soccer safety measures

    The memory of a 6-year-old Vernon Hills boy who died in 2003 after a soccer goal post fell on him will live on in a new law aimed at preventing other children and their families from suffering the same tragedy. With the boy’s family looking on Tuesday, Zach’s Law, or the Movable Soccer Goal Safety Act as it’s formally known, was signed into law by Gov. Pat Quinn at the Waukegan...

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    Louis Bianchi

    Charges against Bianchi thrown out again

    McHenry County State's Attorney Louis Bianchi's second misconduct trial ended just like the first, with a Winnebago County judge throwing out the charges against Bianchi without the defense having to call a single witness.

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    Police say a Buffalo Grove woman was looking at her cellphone Monday night before the crash where she struck a man who was changing a tire on the shoulder of Route 53.

    Cops: Woman was using phone before Rte. 53 crash

    A Buffalo Grove woman was looking down at her cell phone when she sideswiped a truck on Route 53 last night before losing control and smashing into a man changing his tire, according to police.

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    Hoffman Estates Mayor William McLeod introduces the village’s new emergency management coordinator, Nichole Collins.

    Hoffman Estates hires emergency management coordinator

    The village of Hoffman Estates has hired Nichole Collins as its new emergency management coordinator. She will take on the day-to-day responsibilities of the village's emergency management program.

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    Walsh announces plan for 10 town-hall meetings in 10 days

    Congressman Joe Walsh announced plans Tuesday to host will host 10 town-hall meetings in 10 days througout his 8th Congressional District. Walsh, a Republican from McHenry, will be available to answer questions and address all concerns about federal legislation. Members of Walsh’s staff will also be available to assist residents with federal casework.

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    Waukegan man charged in Gurnee break-in

    Gurnee police announced charges Tuesday against a 43-year-old Waukegan man they say was caught breaking into a home last week by its owner.

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    Mundelein holds free movie night Friday

    The Mundelein Park District will offer a free movie night at 8 p.m. Friday, Aug. 5, at Diamond Lake Beach, between Route 60/83 and Route 45/Lake Street, in Mundelein. The evening will feature the Disney animated film, “UP.”

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    Winning Little Lotto ticket sold in Des Plaines

    A Des Plaines gas station sold a winning Little Lotto ticket Sunday worth $82,500. The winner, who has yet to come forward, matched all five numbers - 1, 5, 6, 7 and 9 - and purchased the ticket at Citgo gas station, 9201 Golf Road.

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    Hoffman Estates agrees to review Randi Lane parking

    In response to a resident's request, Hoffman Estates officials have agreed to take another look at a parking safety complaint on Randi Lane athat goes back 40 years.

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    Police reports
    A St. Charles man was charged with disorderly conduct Saturday at a Geneva sporting goods store after police said he entered teh store carrying a 9 mm pistol and refused to let an employee check whether the gun was loaded.

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    Drowning of Hanover Park man ruled an accident

    A 19-year-old Hanover Park man who was swimming in Lake Michigan late Monday night with friends accidentally drowned, the Cook County medical examiner's office confirmed Tuesday.

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    Mexican drug cartel distribution ring head jailed

    A man said by federal prosecutors to have headed a distribution network in the Chicago area for a Mexican drug-trafficking cartel has been sentenced to 40 years in prison.Jose Gonzalez-Zavala pleaded guilty earlier this year to orchestrating the distribution of more than 420 kilograms of cocaine and collecting more than $5.7 million in drug proceeds.

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    Crews hunting for Asian carp in lake near Chicago

    Crews are searching for invasive Asian carp near Chicago following several recent discoveries of their genetic material in Lake Calumet.

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    Illinois has 7 cases linked to turkey salmonella

    Seven people in Illinois have been sickened with salmonella poisoning in a national outbreak authorities say is likely linked to ground turkey.Overall 77 cases in 26 states have been reported. One person has died, but not in Illinois.

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    Mike Nerheim, Republican candidate for Lake County state’s attorney

    Former prosecutor third to join Lake Co. state’s attorney race

    Waukegan attorney Mike Nerheim said Tuesday he would seek justice rather than just obtain convictions if elected the next Lake County state’s attorney. Nerheim, a Republican from Gurnee, became the third candidate to declare his intention to replace retiring State’s Attorney Michael Waller.

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    Police reports
    Jennifer L. Hollowell, 18, of the 300 block of Harvest Gate in Lake in the Hills, appeared in bond court Tuesday on charges of possession of a controlled substance, a felony, according to court documents. Carpentersville police responded to a call saying people were smoking marijuana in a car at about 8 p.m. Sunday in the 1600 bock of Sacramento Drive in Carpentersville, police said. During a...

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    To increase attendance and handle at the track, Arlington Park officials want the Illinois Racing Board to award them 3 night racing dates on their 90-day racing calendar next season, and they want to be named the host track in the spring, which would take revenue away from Hawthorne Racecourse.

    Arlington Park seeks 3 night racing dates

    Arlington Park after dark? It could be. But if Arlington Park officials get their way with night racing and as well as a bid to be the host track in the spring, the move also would turn out the lights for Hawthorne Racecourse’s spring meet.

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    Cary District 26 union wants final arbitration

    The Cary Education Association has invited the Cary Elementary District 26 school board to enter into interest arbitration to settle the ongoing teacher contract dispute.

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    Des Plaines spa loses $5,200 in break-in

    Burglars have broken into another Northwest suburban spa, with the loss this time put at $5,200, Des Plaines police reported. Burglars hit five spas in Arlington Heights and Palatine last week.

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    SEC says pharma execs lied about goat's blood drug

    Federal regulators are charging four pharmaceutical executives with misleading investors with claims that a drug derived from goat's blood might be approved for human use.

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    Wis residents with salmonella poisoning are better

    The state health department says the three Wisconsin residents with salmonella poisoning connected to a national outbreak possibly involving ground turkey have recovered.

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    Jim Green from Montgomery creates balloon animals for his grandchildren and other youngsters at last year’s North Aurora Days.

    North Aurora Days brings back traditional events

    North Aurora Days will kick off with three-days of festivities on Friday, Aug. 5. The festival runs through Sunday, Aug. 7. Several popular events are back including the community garage sale, baggo tournament and the pet parade.

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    Woman sets Appalachian Trial fastest-hike record

    A woman says she has set the unofficial record for the fastest hike of the entire 2,180-mile Appalachian Trail.

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    North Aurora Days race gets a makeover

    “When I had the chance to organize a race in my own hometown, I was there,” Kerri Branson said. Branson of North Aurora, a running enthusiast, organized The Eagles Run, a 5K, 10K and one-mile fun run set for Saturday, Aug. 6, in conjunction with North Aurora Days.

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    Horse racetracks take different tacks during heat

    Rafael Hernandez was red hot — not just because he rode Electric Stride to Fairmount Park's winner's circle, the jockey's third win in as many races that afternoon, but because the temperature and humidity together made it feel as if it was 105 degrees.

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    Delois Barrett Campbell, gospel singer, dead at 85

    Delois Barrett Campbell, a member of the award-winning Barrett Sisters trio who electrified audiences worldwide with their powerful gospel harmonies, died Tuesday. She was 85.

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    Kids ride the spinning wheel at a previous Augustfest.

    Midsummer festival at St. Zachary Church in Des Plaines
    American English is the opening act for Augustfest taking place Aug. 4-7 on the grounds of St. Zachary Catholic Church, 567 W. Algonquin Road, Des Plaines. It offers food, beer and wine, raffle, a casino, carnival, bingo, children’s entertainment and a classic car show.

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    Mt. Prospect restaurant hosts benefit concert

    The Brass from the Past will be back for an encore benefit performance, Aug. 17, at the Ye Olde Town Inn, 18 W. Busse Ave., Mount Prospect to raise money for the United Relief Foundation, which helps Illinois veterans in need.

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    Carpentersville Rotary Club to clean highways
    The Rotary Club of Carpentersville will begin its inaugural highway cleanup of the recently adopted highways in the Carpentersville community Saturday, Aug. 6.

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    K of C hosts Fox Valley charity golf event
    One of the Fox Valley’s premier annual golf events, the 2011 Hammer Open Charity Classic will be held on Sunday, Aug. 21, at the Golf Club of Illinois, 575 Edgewood Drive in Algonquin.

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    Pay fees, get class info at Dist. 50’s residency event

    Woodland Elementary District 50 will hold its fifth annual proof of residency event Aug. 9-11 at the Woodland Middle School gymnasium, 7000 Washington St., Gurnee. The purpose of the event is to confirm that all students attending Woodland schools are District 50 residents.

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    After 20 years, Wheaton church may have a home

    Twenty years without a permanent home, Church of the Resurrection, an Anglican Church with missionary connections to Christians in Rwanda, may have found one on the western edge of downtown Wheaton. The church, which now meets at Glenbard West High School, would move to a site on the 900 block of West Union Avenue, which housed the old Alcoa Flexible Packaging plant that closed in 2006.

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    Round Lake Beach looks to new TIF for street and other upgrades

    A fourth special financing district to be established in Round Lake Beach would help fund $30 million or more in road and other imporvements in a southwest side neighborhood.

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    South Elgin High School scoreboard gets sponsors

    The Elgin Area District U-46 school board approved a donation from Bear Family Restaurants and a sponsorship deal with the Coca-Cola Co. to display advertising on the new scoreboard at South Elgin High School stadium. The contracts are worth $25,000 each over a five-year span.

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    Naperville police investigating copper thefts

    The Naperville Police Department is investigating multiple incidents of stolen copper piping from vacant new homes, which have occurred, mainly in the far southwestern end of the city.

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    Decatur man faces hate crime charge

    A Decatur man faces a hate crime charge after a confrontation last month with another man outside a small-town restaurant.

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    Oil falls to near $94 as US economy weakens

    Oil settled below $94 per barrel Tuesday as investors continued to worry about weak consumer spending and sluggish economic growth.

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    Ex-attorney again gets 12 years for fraud, porn

    A once-prominent attorney who authorities say tried to blackmail his ex-wife with decades-old nude photos of her sister didn't have any better luck during a resentencing hearing ordered by a federal appeals court, again getting 12 years in federal prison on child-porn and bankruptcy fraud charges.

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    Saudi takes step to build tallest tower

    Saudi Arabia took a key step forward Tuesday in its plan to build the world’s tallest tower and outdo Gulf neighbor Dubai, which inaugurated its own record-breaking skyscraper less than two years ago.

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    Obama signs debt relief package

    President Barack Obama says the emergency bill Congress passed to prevent a government default is just the first step to ensuring the country lives within its means.

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    Crews hunting for Asian carp in lake near Chicago

    Crews are searching for invasive Asian carp near Chicago following several recent discoveries of their genetic material in Lake Calumet.

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    Pipe bomb found in northern Illinois

    Officials in northern Illinois say a bomb squad was called to dispose of a pipe bomb in Boone County.

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    Artist Nancy Krahn of Algonquin was the winner of the Geneva Art Fair’s inaugural “On the Floor” project.

    Geneva Arts Fair winners announced
    Geneva Chamber of Commerce recently announced the 2011 Geneva Arts Fair winners. Judging took place July 23-24 and four winners each in 2-D and 3-D were awarded ribbons, including four artists from Illinois.

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    Cars theme marks latest Elgin movie screening

    Cars will fill Festival Park in real life and on screen Thursday as the City of Elgin and the Downtown Neighborhood Association team up for the latest installment of the Family Movie Series, sponsored by the city. A pre-movie car show will begin at 7 p.m. with the movie starting at sunset.

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    Illinois governor to make good on Packers bet

    Illinois Gov. Pat Quinn fulfilled his end of a losing football bet by working in a Wisconsin food pantry. But that didn't put an end to the gubernatorial trash talking.

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    Ground turkey is being linked to salmonella poisonings in Illinois

    7 Illinois cases of salmonella linked to ground turkey

    Seven people in Illinois have been sickened with salmonella poisoning in a national outbreak authorities say is likely linked to ground turkey.

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    Ellis Wylie, 19, of Grayslake, finished in the top 11 on “The Glee Project.”

    Grayslake's ‘Glee Project' finalist learns the ropes

    Ellis Wylie of Grayslake made it to the final 11 in "The Glee Project," but dealing with online critics was tough, she says. "There was one person on Twitter who got to me. She wrote, .. ‘You blew your only shot.' That hurt.”

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    Autopsy results expected Tuesday on NH girl

    Investigators hope an autopsy set for Tuesday on an 11-year-old New Hampshire girl will shed light on her disappearance and death.

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    Ixonia man charged in neighbor's shooting death

    A southeastern Wisconsin man stole his neighbor's rifle and used it to kill him because of a dispute over their shared lawn, according to a criminal complaint.

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    Des Plaines residents win fight against 100-foot cell tower

    In a decision that pleased several citizens who showed up to protest it, the Des Plaines City Council on Monday narrowly decided to deny a 100-foot cell tower.

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    Daniel Baker

    Defense in Vernon Hills murder gets more time

    Attorneys for a Deerfield man accused of murdering his girlfriend's mother in her Vernon Hills home received more time Tuesday to decide if they will challenge a report finding their client mentally fit to stand trial. Daniel Baker, 21, was found fit on May 14.

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    Dexter Curry

    Man charged in Dominick’s pepper spray attack

    A Chicago man accused of dousing two women with pepper spray at a Willowbrook grocery store was ordered held Tuesday on $250,000 bail. Dexter Curry, 40, is charged with aggravated battery.

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    Mistaken identities keep Janus audiences laughing
    Janus Theatre presents its first Summer Rep 2011 series featuring “The Importance of Being Earnest” by Oscar Wilde and “Twelfth Night” by William Shakespeare. The Summer Rep 2011 series will open Aug. 4 and run through Aug. 28.

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    North Aurora Police Officer Michael Quinn, left, speaks to his son, Aidan, before receiving a Medal of Distinguished Service at the North Aurora village board meeting Monday evening. Quinn pulled a man out of a burning car after a three-vehicle crash at Randall and Orchard roads in May.

    N. Aurora officer honored for pulling man from burning car

    North Aurora Police Officer Michael Quinn was modest as he received the Medal of Distinguished Service Monday night for pulling a man out of a burning vehicle. "I know that any of my colleagues would have done the same thing at the same time," he told the village board.

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    Douglas “Mike” Hitzeroth was drafted at age 18 in 1944 and flew as part of a replacement crew aboard B-17 bombers while stationed in Italy in World War II.

    Suburban vets discover they flew on same WWII B-17

    West suburban vets Kenneth Chapek and Douglas “Mike” Hitzeroth each flew a B-17 named The Biggast Bird in World War II, but they didn't meet until 1986. Now friends, together they share details of The Biggast Bird and what it was like to fly during WWII.

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    Free kids health fair offered in McHenry
    The annual McHenry County Children’s Health & Safety Fair will be from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Wednesday, Aug. 3, at McHenry County College, 8900 Route 14, in Crystal Lake. Admission is free.

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    Restaurant’s farmer to speak at Green Drinks meeting
    On the first Wednesday of each month, McHenry County Green Drinks members gather upstairs at Duke’s Alehouse & Kitchen to network and talk about “greening” the future. The Aug. 3 meeting will feature Emily Zack, Duke’s Alehouse and Kitchen’s head farmer, talking about the restaurant’s farm project.

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    Ill. lawyer imprisoned for taking drugs to inmate

    A southern Illinois defense attorney who once served as a judge has been ordered to spend a year and four months in federal prison after he admitted in court that he tried to sneak heroin to a former client serving a life sentence in a federal lockup in Indiana.

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    US relaxes terror rules to speed aid to Somalia

    U.S. officials say aid groups can deliver food to famine-stricken parts of Somalia without fear of prosecution, even if some assistance is diverted to extremists.

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    While holding a Grand Champion ribbon and also being awarded a Reserve Grand Champion ribbon as well, Karen Seegers, 11, of Harvard keeps an eye on one of her several New Zealand White rabbits during junior judging at the McHenry County Fair.

    County fair returns to McHenry, new tent to promote local talent

    The McHenry County Fair opens Wednesday, Aug. 3 and runs through Sunday, Aug. 7 in Woodstock. Highlights include the Miss McHenry County fair queen competition, tractor and truck pulls, a tractor salute to veterans, 4H competitions, and the mother-daughter look-alike contest.

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    CDC: 1 death, 76 illnesses linked to ground turkey

    Federal officials say one person has died from salmonella poisoning that appears to be linked to eating ground turkey, but the government is still investigating who produced the meat and has not initiated a recall.

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    Mark Welsh/mwelsh@dailyherald.com Minister Brandyn Simmons of Schaumburg applauds as the marriage between Nicolette Zullo and Scott Kochanski both of Schaumburg is sealed with a kiss at Voelkening Park in Schaumburg on Monday. They are members of the Schaumburg High School class of '81 which just held its 30th anniversary reunion last month.

    '81 Schaumburg High classmates wed on 8/1

    Monday's date had a certain ring to it for a pair of former Schaumburg High School graduates. Scott Kochanski and Nikki Zullo married on Monday, 8/1, less than two weeks after their 30th high school reunion. Both were in the class of 1981 at Schaumburg High School.

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    More heat, storms, then cooler air takes over

    The bad news is that officials have posted a heat advisory this morning to announce it could feel like 110 degrees today. - But, the good news is that temperatures are expected to drop significantly for a week after heavy storms move through the area later this afternoon.

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    St. Charles Alderman Jim Martin heard some echoes of support Monday night for his long-held belief that the city has far too many taverns.

    Aldermen worry there are too many bars in St. Charles

    Rich Simpson wants to open a business called the Alibi Bar & Grill at 12 N. Third St in St. Charles. Aldermen told Simpson on Monday that they welcome the “grill” part of his plan, but they aren't big fans of the “bar” part.

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    Stephens resigns after 27 years in Illinois House

    A southern Illinois Republican who has served in the state's House for more than a quarter century said he is resigning for personal reasons and not because he's affected by redrawn district maps.

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    Ill. boat club plans vote on women members

    Membership in the Motor Boat Club at Lake Springfield has been limited to men since it opened in 1933, but that may be about to change.

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    WTC owner: Memorial construction unhurt by walkout

    About 200 laborers stood down from their jobs for a second day Tuesday at the World Trade Center site, although the owner said the work stoppage had a minimal impact on the new skyscraper and transit hub there, and no impact on the memorial.

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    Locked-out union members voting on Honeywell deal

    Locked-out workers of a southern Illinois plant that helps make nuclear fuel are voting on a three-year contract proposal.

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    Clinton sees Syrian activists as pressure mounts

    Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton is meeting with U.S.-based Syrian democracy activists as the Obama administration weighs new sanctions on Syria. The meeting comes amid mounting congressional calls for action against President Bashar Assad's regime.

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    NW Ind. doctor who hid in Italy wants trial moved

    A former northwestern Indiana surgeon captured in Italy after more than five years on the run wants his trial on federal health care fraud charges moved to another part of the state.

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    NYC mosque developer: Project may take years

    The developer of an Islamic community center and mosque near ground zero says it may take years to determine what kind of project Muslims and non-Muslims want.

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    Hanover Park teen drowns in Lake Michigan

    A 19-year-old Hanover Park man is dead after Chicago Fire Department divers pulled him unconscious from Lake Michigan.

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    3 plead not guilty in fatal Galesburg shooting

    Three men have pleaded not guilty to charges related to a fatal shooting in a crowded park in the western Illinois city of Galesburg.

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    US to propose ammonium nitrate regulations

    More than 15 years after a fertilizer bomb was used to blow up a government building in Oklahoma City, killing 168 people, the federal government is proposing to regulate the sale and transfer of the chemical ammonium nitrate.

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    Wisconsin farm exports grew in 2010

    Wisconsin farm exports grew 36 percent in 2010, with only Texas and Tennessee farm exports growing at a better rate.

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    3 people stabbed in Chicago drug store

    Authorities are investigating an early morning attack at a Chicago drug store that left three people with knife wounds.

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    Garden caters to Alzheimer's patients

    When it comes to Alzheimer's disease, Deb Greiner said the present counts most. "They live in the moment," said Greiner, director of Alzheimer's services at the DeKalb County Rehab & Nursing Center. "Our job is to give them as many moments as possible."

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    Walldogs returning to Danville

    It's been a year since a group of mural artists made their way to Danville and painted the town with a series of murals. But the Walldogs are about to return.

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    Report: 1994 Honda Accord most popular for thieves

    Honda Motor Co.’s 1994 Accord was the most-frequently stolen car in the U.S. in 2010 for the third straight year as weak security systems and a demand for parts drew thieves, the National Insurance Crime Bureau said.

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    Chicago area Muslims push for a 'green' Ramadan

    Chicago-area Muslims say they've got an additional focus during the holy month of Ramadan — the environment.

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    Man convicted of abuse for breaking child's legs

    An Elgin man has been found guilty of breaking the legs of a child in his care.

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    Man gets 18-year sentence in tax fraud conspiracy

    A former Chicago man who pleaded guilty to running a tax fraud ring from Israel has been sentenced to serve 18 years and four months in federal prison.

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    Moscow ballet dancer teaching in Galesburg

    A dancer with the Moscow Ballet is teaching a week-long intensive summer dance program in Galesburg.

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    Banks get tools to stop elder financial abuse

    Employees of Illinois financial institutions are now required to be trained to identify the signs that someone is a victim of financial exploitation.

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    River mud is going to gardens in 2 Chicago suburbs

    A program that brings mud dredged from Illinois rivers to communities for creating gardens is coming to two Chicago suburbs.

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    Judge orders Casey Anthony to report for probation

    Casey Anthony, whose whereabouts have been a secret since her dramatic murder acquittal last month, may have to report to a probation officer in central Florida this week under a judge's order Monday in another case against her.

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    Phyllis Howat paints a chicken for display at the Holmstad, a retirement community in Batavia.

    Holmstad chickens ruffle no feathers in Batavia

    Inspired by the bulldog sculptures decorating Batavia, residents of the Holmstad, a senior community, decided to put together a similar exhibit. Their choice? "We chose chickens," said resident Ellen Hamilton.

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    Javier Sotelo of Des Plaines, having occupational therapy.

    ‘Miracle baby’ now 5, and continues to surprise

    Around Advocate Lutheran General Hospital in Park Ridge, they still call 5-year-old Javier Sotelo of Des Plaines the “miracle baby.” He lived the first three years of his life in the hospital, but recently, he nearly brought down the house in the hospital’s “Rising Stars Talent Show.”

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    Search for man in Woodridge pond resumes

    The underwater search for a 25-year-old man from Bolingbrook who disappeared in a Woodridge retention pond after his canoe tipped over is expected to resume this morning. Jeremy Asbell disappeared at about 2 a.m. in the retention pond near Woodward Avenue and Frontage Road. Asbell and another man were canoing in the pond when the boat capsized.

Sports

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    John Danks allowed 4 runs on 9 hits in 6 innings of work Tuesday night.

    Sox can’t even get a rain delay right in loss Tuesday

    From top to bottom, the White Sox can’t do anything right.Add legendary groundskeeper Roger Bossard’s name to the list, not that many people noticed.With just 21,666 in the seats at U.S. Cellular Field, largely thanks to “premier” ticket pricing with the Yankees in town, Tuesday night’s game was delayed at the start for 45 minutes due to inclement weather in the area.Well, it never rained, and the Sox fans that even bothered showing up could have been out of their misery much earlier had the game started on time.Instead, the skies opened for real in the middle of the seventh inning, creating delay No. 2.In a perfect world, rain would wash out the remaining 55 games on the White Sox’ schedule. That’s how painful it’s been to watch them perform during this latest stretch of uninspired baseball.The Sox trailed New York 6-0 when heavy rain and lightning hit after the Yankees were retired in the top of the seventh inning. And that was the final score when the game was officially called about an hour later.Go ahead and blame starter John Danks for the lopsided score, but you can’t expect White Sox pitchers to keep throwing up zeros when the offense rarely — if ever — shows up.Having allowed just 4 earned runs in his last 36⅔ innings, Danks came in as one of the hottest starting pitchers in the major leagues. His mound opponent, Yankees right-hander Phil Hughes, came in with an 8.24 ERA.Danks didn’t have it, allowing 4 runs on 9 hits in 6 innings, but he didn’t have any run support, either.Even though Hughes has been ineffective while dealing with a shoulder injury, he held the Sox scoreless over 6 innings and allowed just 3 hits.No matter what he does — or doesn’t do — White Sox manager Ozzie Guillen has been unable to light a sustained fire under the offense.One of Tuesday’s highlights, if you want to use that word, was Adam Dunn leading off the second inning with a single to short right field.It has been a miserable season for Dunn, who came into the game with the lowest batting average in baseball at .162.Before the game, Guillen was asked what he is seeing when Dunn’s at the plate.“I want to cry,” Guillen said. “A lot of swing and a miss.”Dunn’s mental makeup also was questioned again. And again Guillen took a shot at Dr. Jeffrey Fishbein, who is in his first season as the Sox’ team psychologist.“We have a guy we pay like $200,000 to help (Dunn),” Guillen said. “Where is he? Somewhere around here. They pay him a lot of money to work with the head guys. It ain’t working right now.”How fitting, and “It Ain’t Working Right Now” sure sounds like a more accurate slogan than “All In.”Danks tried staying positive after the White Sox fell 5½ games behind the first-place Detroit Tigers.“We’re not where we want to be, but there are still a lot of games against (the Central) division,” Danks said. “I feel like the ball’s still in our court. We just have to play good baseball.”sgregor@dailyherald.com

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    Tyler Colvin flies out to right-center field in the fourth inning against Pittsburgh Tuesday night.

    Cubs' Colvin makes big splash in win

    If you're keeping an eye on the right-field situation for the Cubs, Tyler Colvin had a “look-at-me” night Tuesday in Pittsburgh. Colvin went 3-for-5 with a monster home run that bounced into the Allegheny River beyond the right-field wall at PNC Park. It was 1 of 6 home runs hit by the Cubs.

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    Carlos Quentin has a few words with home plate umpire Ted Barrett after striking out against the New York Yankees during the first inning.

    Teixeira powers Yankees to win over White Sox

    Mark Teixeira set a major league record by homering from both sides of the plate for the 12th time and Phil Hughes pitched six innings to send the New York Yankees to their fifth straight victory, 6-0 over the fading Chicago White Sox in a game called after 6 1-2 innings because of rain.

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    Alfonso Soriano hit two of the Cubs' season-high six home runs and the Cubs had a season-best 23 hits in an 11-6 victory over the fading Pittsburgh Pirates on Tuesday night.

    Soriano hits two of Cubs' six homers

    Alfonso Soriano hit two of the Cubs' season-high six home runs and the Cubs had a season-best 23 hits in an 11-6 victory over the fading Pittsburgh Pirates on Tuesday night.

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    Adam Dunn, left, will resume designated hitter duties when Paul Konerko returns to the lineup at first base. Konerko has missed two games after being hit in the left knee with a pitch Sunday against the Tigers.

    Konerko working hard to return

    Paul Konerko's sore left leg is feeling better, but the White Sox' top hitter might not be back in the lineup until Thursday.

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    Cougars support Adam with 4 homers in victory

    BELOIT, Wis. — Jason Adam tossed 6 dominant innings, and Kevin David, Brett Eibner, Jake Kuebler and Orlando Calixte all homered as the Kane County Cougars rolled past the Beloit Snappers 6-2 on Tuesday night at Pohlman Field.The Cougars are 2-2 on their seven-game road trip, and they increased their lead over Clinton for the top playoff spot in the Western Division to 3 games.Beloit fell 5 games behind the Cougars with 33 games remaining in the regular season. The Cougars are 8-3 against Beloit this season, including 5-0 at Pohlman Field.Adam (5-6) gave up a single to the first batter he saw and then retired 18 straight. He struck out five in the win and tossed his first quality start since June 2. He won consecutive outings for the first time since May. David led off the second with a homer off Manuel Soliman (5-8), and Calixte later scored on an error to make it 2-0. Eibner started the third with his 10th homer and Kuebler blasted a 2-run shot in the fifth for a 5-0 lead.Calixte opened the sixth with his third of the season for a 6-0 advantage.Mike Giovenco gave up 2 runs in the bottom of the ninth before Chas Byrne induced a double play to end it and notch his ninth save.

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    Hersey shortstop Tyler Perkowitz made a verbal commitment to Miami University in Ohio on Monday.

    Hersey’s Perkowitz all business on college choice

    Hersey shortstop Tyler Perkowitz took a business-like approach to his decision to play baseball at Miami University in Ohio.

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    One step from a Packers plan that worked

    The Packers of the 1990s provided a model for the Bears' of this decade. Now all management here has to do is be as smart now as management was in Green Bay back then.

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    Fire scouting report

    Midfielder Sebastian Grazzini should see his first MLS action for the Fire (2-6-12, 18 points), but Pavel Pardo might not. A formation change could be in the works also.

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    Tiger Woods returns to play in Thursday’s opening round of the Bridgestone Invitational, a tournament he has won seven times.

    Woods returns to Firestone after 3-month break

    AKRON, Ohio — Tiger Woods was on the practice range just as the sun began to rise Tuesday over Firestone, his first time on a PGA Tour golf course in nearly three months.Even as the season heads toward a conclusion, Woods can't wait to get started."I'm excited to compete, to play," Woods said. "And hopefully, to win the tournament."That part about Woods hasn't changed.It's everything else in the world of golf he once ruled that is so much different. Woods showed up at the Bridgestone Invitational at No. 28, his lowest world ranking since the start of his first full season on the PGA Tour. He has a new caddie — at least temporarily — in Bryon Bell, a childhood friend who now heads up a design business that is not getting much work these days with a downturn in the industry.He no longer is the dominant force in golf, having gone 20 months since his last win at the Australian Masters.For Woods, however, the biggest change is how he feels about his health."The great thing is I don't feel a thing," Woods said. "It feels solid. It feels stable. No pain. That's one of the reasons why I took as long as I did to come back, is that I want to get to this point where I can go ahead and start playing golf again like this. It's been a very long time, and it feels good to go out there today and hit balls like this, go practice and feel nothing and walk around and pretty much do anything I want on the golf course."Asked how long it has been since he felt so good physically, Woods replied, "Years."It almost seems that long ago since he was last in action. Woods, who was No. 1 in the world at the Bridgestone Invitational a year ago, has not played since he walked off the course after nine holes May 12 at The Players Championship with recurring injuries to his left knee and Achilles tendon.He said he injured them during the third round of the Masters while hitting a shot an awkward stance in the pine straw on the 17th hole. Woods said if he had sat out the rest of May, he would have been fine the rest of the year, a lesson he learned this time around.Woods wasn't about to return until he was 100 percent healthy, and he is convinced of that now.He said he started hitting balls a couple of weeks ago, without giving an exact date, and that he got the itch to start playing soon after. Woods said he thought about playing The Greenbrier Classic last week, but decided to wait a little more.What gets him excited?"Trying to beat these boys," Woods said. "That's fun. Getting out there and trying to win golf tournaments, being there with a chance to win, whether you win or fail. Just being there is just a rush, and it's just so much fun. Trying to pull off the shots that you've done in practice when it matters the most, see what you've got. That's fun."In the three months since he was gone, Rory McIlroy shattered his U.S. Open scoring record to par, and good friend Darren Clarke finally won a major at the British Open at age 42. Steve Stricker has won twice to become the highest-ranked American.Clarke, friends with Woods since his final major as an amateur in 1996, will be paired with him the first two rounds."Tiger has been the best player in the world for a very long time," Clarke said. "He has been the guy over my career that has set the benchmark for all the rest of us, and personally he's a good friend of mine. It is fantastic, I think, not just for you guys but for all of world golf just to see Tiger Woods back playing again. I'm sure he will be trying to get himself back up to where he has been before, and personally I don't doubt he'll do that."But for us to have a chance to compete against him again can only be good for the game in general."

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    NBA Players Association president Derek Fisher, right, NBA union chief Billy Hunter, left, and LA Lakers' Theo Ratliff arrive at a midtown hotel for a meeting with the NBA Monday. One month after the lockout began, and three months before the season is scheduled to start, representatives for the NBA owners and locked-out players return to the bargaining table.

    NBA takes legal action against locked-out players

    Trying to head off the chance of an antitrust lawsuit from the NBA Players Association, the league went ahead and beat the union to court. The NBA filed two claims against the NBAPA on Tuesday— an unfair labor practice charge with the National Labor Relations Board and a lawsuit in federal district court in New York.

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    Bears center Chris Spencer walks to the field with teammates during training camp Tuesday at Olivet Nazarene University in Bourbonnais.

    New Bears center Spencer wants to be his own man

    BOURBONNAIS — Recently signed unrestricted free agent center Chris Spencer is well aware that he’s taking the place of Bears legend Olin Kreutz.Kreutz was not brought back after 13 years with the team, despite his status as the team leader.Spencer says it comes with the territory.“It’s part of the business,” the 6-foot-3, 309-pound seventh-year veteran said. “A guy’s taking over for me in Seattle, and I respect the (heck) out of Olin.“He’s been a great guy for me to watch over the years. I’m just coming in here to play my game and do what I can do to help this team win.“I’m a different guy (than Kreutz), and I can’t worry about what happened here in the past. I just want to focus on how I can help this team win, and I feel like I can step in and help right away and take my game to the next level.”Spencer is expected to line up as the first-team center, enabling Roberto Garza to move back to right guard.Pick a pair:Third-round draft pick Chris Conte caught the eye of coach Lovie Smith during Tuesday afternoon’s practice with a pair of interceptions in 11-on-11 work.“As a rookie, you need to do something to show up,” Smith said. “If you are a defensive back it’s about getting interceptions, and I like some of the things he’s done.”Conte is in the mix for playing time at safety behind starters Chris Harris and Major Wright. Both of Conte’s interceptions came against rookie quarterback Nathan Enderle, the fifth-round draft choice from Idaho. Familiar face:Veteran tight end Desmond Clark, an unrestricted free agent, agreed to terms on a one-year contract Tuesday to return for what will be his ninth season with the Bears and his 13th in the NFL.The 34-year-old Clark ranks ninth in team history with 242 receptions. His 2,639 receiving yards rank 20th, and his 18 touchdown receptions are tied for 18th. Clark has started 99 games for the Bears, but none last year when he saw action in just five games and caught 1 pass for 12 yards.After trading Greg Olsen and releasing Brandon Manumaleuna, the Bears were left with just two experienced tight ends, Matt Spaeth and Kellen Davis.In another move, second-year safety K.J. Gerard was waived.Place your bets:General manager Jerry Angelo is happy with the value he believes the Bears got in free agents like tight end Matt Spaeth, running back Marion Barber (two years, $5 million), wide receiver Roy Williams (one year, $1.5 million) and defensive end Vernon Gholston.“We got a good football player at what I consider a good value,” Angelo said of Barber, a Pro Bowl player in 2007 who has more recently been hobbled by injuries and seen his production dip. “The thing I like about some of the players we have, in particular Roy Williams and Vernon Gholston, they could have had more money at other places. “I like players that like to bet on themselves. I respect that about them. It tells you a little about how they feel about our situation and how they feel about themselves. We don’t base our evaluations on resumes. Resumes are how we evaluate them to get here, but once they’re here, now it’s up to them and coaches to make those decisions.”Rah-rah:The Bears have an off-day today. The next time they hit the practice field at Olivet Nazarene on Thursday at 7 p.m., they expect to have 16 more players participating, the free agents who were not allowed on the field until Aug. 4.“We can’t wait to see what it looks like,” coach Lovie Smith said. “As you can see on the sideline, we have a lot of good football players that have been carrying the water jug and cheerleading for the guys. We’re anxious to see them on the football field. They’re going to make us a lot better; all of them.”

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    Richard Dent will finally become the third member of the legendary 1985 Chicago Bears defense to be inducted into the Hall of Fame on Saturday, Aug. 6, 2011, when he joins fellow ìMonsters of the Midwayî Dan Hampton and Mike Singletary, an honor that his teammates and coaches say is long overdue. (AP Photo/David Boe, File)

    Dent finally gets his Hall of Fame moment

    Richard Dent had just joined the Bears, and Dan Hampton was a little less than impressed.He saw a player who was scrawny — even a bit lazy — and when defensive coordinator Buddy Ryan asked about two weeks into practices what Hampton thought of the rookie, well, the “Danimal” couldn’t be restrained, using a few choice words to describe him.“I said, ‘Why, you like him?’” Hampton recalled. “And Buddy said, ‘Watch him. He never makes a bad decision, and that’s the essence of being a defensive lineman.’”What a defensive end he turned out to be. And now, after some near misses, Dent’s long wait for a spot in the Hall of Fame is just about over.Dent finally will become the third member of that legendary 1985 Bears defense to be inducted into the Hall on Saturday, when he joins fellow “Monsters of the Midway” Hampton and Mike Singletary. It’s an honor his teammates and coaches say is long overdue.Who can forget the mangled mess of opponents that group left behind while shuffling all the way to a championship? Whether it was the crunching hits or Dent bursting past the tackle and stripping the ball as he sacked the quarterback, few teams made offenses wilt like that one.He will go in as part of a class that includes Shannon Sharpe, Marshall Faulk, Chris Hanburger, Les Richter, Ed Sabol and Deion Sanders. Dent will be presented by his old coach at Tennessee State who, like Hampton, was far from impressed — at first.“I’m very appreciative of those people who appreciate my career and having an opportunity to come in their homes to entertain them on Sundays,” Dent said. “They can turn you off, but they turn you on.”A four-time Pro Bowl pick and MVP of the Super Bowl in 1986, Dent played 15 seasons and is tied for sixth with John Randle on the NFL’s all-time sacks list with 137½.He set a team record with 17½ in 1984, led the NFL with 17 sacks a year later, and finished with 10 or more eight times in his career.Now, after missing out as a finalist six of the previous seven years, he’s finally going into the Hall.Not bad for a guy who barely made his college team, who then watched as 202 players got drafted before him in 1983 and who showed up to the Bears undersized and needing extensive dental work.“The thing about Richard was he really made himself what he became,” said Mike Ditka, the 1985 Bears coach.He’s the first Hall of Famer from Tennessee State, a historically black school that produced Pro Bowl picks such as Ed “Too Tall” Jones and Claude Humphrey. And yet, Joe Gilliam Sr. wanted nothing to do with Dent.He just couldn’t avoid him, though. And on Saturday, he will be the one making the presentation.As tough and as quick as he was, Dent was easy to overlook because he didn’t really stand out as a physical specimen.Even though he put on weight in college, he still only tipped the scales in the 220s when he started with the Bears. He also had to undergo extensive dental work. But soon the eighth-round pick began to pack on the pounds, eventually playing at about 265. Ryan, the coordinator of that 46 defense, said he simply “had all the natural ability in the world,” and he stood out on a unit packed with stars.Now, finally, he’s set to take his place among the game’s greats.

  •  
    Former Chicago Bandits leadoff hitter Stacy May-Johnson is coming out of retirement to play the final two months of the season for the Rosemont club. May-Johnson helped Team USA to win the World Cup of Softball championship.

    Two-time MVP rejoins Bandits

    Two-time National Pro Fastpitch MVP Stacy May-Johnson has decided to come out of retirement and join the Chicago Bandits for the final month of the 2011 season.

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    Bears offensive coordinator Mike Martz, center, talks with quarterbacks Jay Cutler, left, and Caleb Hanie during camp Monday. On Tuesday, Martz told reporters he was “giddy” watching Cutler’s improved dropbacks and footwork.

    Bears’ Martz likes what he sees from Cutler, O-line

    All is well with the Bears’ offense, at least it seems that way after listening to offensive coordinator Mike Martz extol the virtues of his troops. Among the things Martz is happy with is Jay Cutler's progress.

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    Chris Chelios of the Blackhawks, right, moves the puck as he tries to avoid a push by Claude LaPointe of the Quebec Nordiques on Nov. 8, 1991. Chelios, who became the second-oldest player on the ice in an NHL game on Jan. 8, 2008, was named to the Hall of Fame Monday.

    Images: Chris Chelios
    Former Chicago Blackhawk Chris Chelios, one of the NHL's all-time great defensemen, was named to the U.S. Hockey Hall of Fame. Chelios reitred in 2010 after playing with the Chicago Wolves.

  •  
    PGA Tour pro Kevin Streelman of Winfield returns to his suburban roots this week to take part in the Illinois Junior Golf Association Wilson Staff Slam finals on Friday at Cantigny in Wheaton. Streelman will give a four-hole playing lesson and present awards to the oungh competitors.

    Past champ returns for Illinois Women’s Open

    This 17th staging of the Phil Kosin Illinois Women’s Open will be something special. Even Diane Daugherty, the event's first champion, will be in the field.

Business

  •  
    Casinos around Nevada are taking part in a weeklong education campaign to push responsible gambling.

    Casinos take different spins on wise gambling week

    Casinos around Nevada are taking part in a weeklong education campaign to push responsible gambling. The campaign runs through Friday and is sponsored by the American Gaming Association. This year's theme is "Know the Odds," and features brochures teaching patrons that the house has an advantage in casino games.

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    Atlanta airport worker killed; trapped under lift

    ATLANTA — A spokesman at Atlanta’s airport says a worker was killed after becoming trapped for hours under a hydraulic lift in a cargo area.John Kennedy said late Tuesday the man’s body has been removed from under the lift. Fulton County medical examiner’s office investigator Laura Salm identified him as 29-year-old Eric Lee of Cartersville.Atlanta fire Capt. Jolyon Bundrige says rescuers worked for more than two hours to try and free him. A helicopter was on stand-by to take him to a hospital.But Kennedy confirmed later that he didn’t survive.

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    Kirin purchase of Brazil brewer meets opposition

    TOKYO — A $2.53 billion bid by Kirin Holdings Co. for a controlling stake in Brazilian brewer Schincariol Group has failed to win over investors on either side of the Pacific.Schincariol minority shareholders have vowed to block the sale, and investors in Japan appear to worry the bid may be too expensive for the Japanese drinks company.The purchase is part of Kirin’s efforts to find new growth overseas to offset a shrinking, aging population at home. Brazil’s large beverage market is expected to grow rapidly along with the country’s economy.Kirin’s shares fell more than 4 percent in trading Wednesday on the Tokyo Stock Exchange amid questions about the hefty price tag. The issue undershot the benchmark Nikkei 225 index’s 1.7 percent decline.Kirin’s move highlights an aggressive global shopping spree this year by Japanese companies seeking to benefit from a strong yen, which makes overseas deals more affordable, and abundant cash. The March 11 earthquake and tsunami added to their drive to secure new business outside of Japan.Data from Dealogic shows that the value of overseas takeovers and acquisitions by Japanese firms so far in 2011 is up 110 percent from a year earlier to $46.7 billion.Kirin’s latest purchase is the third-biggest overseas deal this year and the second-biggest Japanese acquisition in Latin America on record, according to Dealogic. It follows Takeda Pharmaceutical’s $13.7 billion purchase of Switzerland’s Nycomed and Terumo Corp.’s $2.6 billion takeover of Colorado-based CaridianBCT Holding Corp. earlier this year.Under Tuesday’s deal worth 3.95 billion Brazilian reals, Kirin acquired all outstanding shares of Aleadri-Schinni Participacoes e Representacoes S.A., which holds 50.45 percent of Schincariol.But Schincariol minority shareholders led by Gilberto, Daniela and Jose Augusto Schincariol oppose the sale and said they would block it.In a joint statement, they said that “for the purpose of defending the interests of the employees, suppliers and Brazilian consumers,” they “do not recognize the legitimacy of any transaction involving share transfers to third parties” such as Kirin.“The legislation and the bylaws of Schincariol are clear. None of the parties may offer their shares to third parties before abiding by the right of first offer and right of first refusal to which shareholders are entitled to,” the statement read.It added that any attempt to infringe on those rights would be subject to judicial challenge.Schincariol’s press office said the company had no comment.With Schincariol, Kirin gains a foothold into South America’s biggest economy, where the beer and soft drink markets are worth an estimated 3 trillion yen ($38.8 billion) each.Schincariol is the second-largest beer producer in Brazil, known for brands such as Nova Schin, Devassa and Bem Loura. It also ranks third in the country’s carbonated soft-drinks market.It owns 13 factories and a nationwide distribution network in Brazil, Kirin said in a statement.The acquisition provides Kirin “a solid base in the fast-growing Brazilian market in addition to the existing base in the Asia and Oceana regions,” the company said.The company aims to generate 30 percent of its sales and profits from outside Japan by 2015. In 2009, it bought full control of major Australian brewer Lion Nathan Ltd. and almost half of San Miguel Brewery Inc. of the Philippines.———Associated Press writer Stan Lehman in Sao Paulo, Brazil, contributed to this report.———Follow Tomoko A. Hosaka at http://twitter.com/tomokohosaka

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    FAA shutdown to continue as Congress leaves

    WASHINGTON — The government is likely to lose more than $1 billion in airline ticket taxes because lawmakers have left town for a month without resolving a partisan standoff over a bill to end the partial shutdown of the Federal Aviation Administration.The government already has lost more than $200 million since airlines are unable to collect taxes on ticket sales because the FAA’s operating authority has expired. The Senate recessed on Tuesday until September, erasing any possibility for quickly resolving the issue. The House left Monday night.Caught up in the partisan acrimony are nearly 4,000 FAA employees who have been furloughed. The FAA also has issued stop work orders on more than 200 construction projects, threatening the jobs of thousands of other workers. Air traffic controllers, however, remain on the job.The debacle could have had an upside for airline passengers because ticket taxes, which typically average about $30 on a $300 round-trip fare, are suspended during the shutdown. But airlines decided to pocket the windfall. Within hours of the shutdown on July 23, most airlines raised their fares by amounts equivalent to the taxes that disappeared.Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood called airline CEOs to complain and lawmakers have sent letters demanding the fare hikes be reversed and the profits be placed in escrow. But their howls have largely been ignored. Airlines collectively lost about $440 million in the first six months of this year, according to the Air Transport Association.Some passengers will be due tax refunds if they bought their tickets and paid taxes before the shutdown, but their travel took place during the time airlines no longer had authority to collect the money. Airlines and the Internal Revenue Service are quarreling over who will handle the complicated and expensive process of getting those refunds to passengers. President Barack Obama implored Congress on Tuesday to settle the dispute before leaving town, calling the stalemate “another Washington-inflicted wound on America.”LaHood, a former GOP congressman, conveyed the same message in a series of private meetings on Capitol Hill and in phone calls to lawmakers, but was unable to clinch a deal.Sen. Jay Rockefeller, D-W.Va., chairman of the Senate committee that oversees the FAA, held out the possibility that if the Senate were able to pass a bill acceptable to Democrats, it could still be approved by the House using obscure parliamentary procedures, and sent to the White House.But his House counterpart, Rep. John Mica, R-Fla., ruled out that possibility. The only way left to end the shutdown is for the Senate to agree to a previously passed House bill containing $16.5 million cuts in air service subsidies to 13 rural communities that some Democrats — particularly Rockefeller — find objectionable.“The only one holding this up now is Mr. Rockefeller,” Mica said. One of the 13 communities that would lose subsidies is Morgantown, W.Va.The entire air service subsidy program costs about $200 million a year, roughly the amount the government lost in uncollected ticket taxes in the first week of the shutdown. The program was created after airlines were deregulated in 1978 to ensure continued service on less profitable routes to remote communities. But critics say some communities receiving subsidies are within a reasonable driving distance of a hub airport. Subsidies per airline passenger range as high as $3,720 in Ely, Nev., to as low as $9.21 in Thief River Falls, Minn., according to the House Transportation and Infrastructure Committee.

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    Chinese agency downgrades US credit rating

    BEIJING — A little-known Chinese ratings agency has downgraded the rating of the United States from A+ to A. The move is unlikely to affect U.S. borrowing rates but reflects the pessimism Washington’s debt battle has generated worldwide.President Barack Obama signed emergency legislation to boost the debt ceiling ahead of a deadline to avoid an unprecedented national default.Still, China’s Dagong Global Credit Rating Co. said Wednesday that the deal doesn’t change the fact that U.S. debt growth has outpaced its economy and fiscal revenue.Dagong is little-known outside China but hopes to compete with global ratings agencies Moody’s, Standard & Poor’s and Fitch.Moody’s has said the U.S. will retain its highest bond rating but with a “negative” outlook.

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    Moody's backs US triple-A rating; outlook negative

    Moody's Investors Service said Tuesday that the United States will retain its triple-A bond rating following passage of legislation to boost the debt ceiling. But the agency put a "negative" outlook on the rating, raising the specter of a future downgrade.

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    Stocks now down for year as economic concerns grow

    The stock market is on its longest losing streak since the financial meltdown of 2008, confronted almost every day by fresh evidence that the economy is in serious trouble again.

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    Honda Motor Co.'s 1994 Accord was the most-frequently stolen car in the U.S. in 2010 for the third straight year as weak security systems and a demand for parts drew thieves, the National Insurance Crime Bureau said.

    2010 Report: 1994 Honda Accord most popular among thieves

    Honda Motor Co.'s 1994 Accord was the most-frequently stolen car in the U.S. in 2010 for the third straight year as weak security systems and a demand for parts drew thieves, the National Insurance Crime Bureau said.

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    Coach net income rises 4 percent in 4Q

    Coach net income rises 4 percent in 4Q

    Coach says its fourth-quarter net income rose 4 percent as the demand for luxury bags in North America continues to improve. Net income rose to $202.5 million, or 68 cents per share. That compares to net income of $195.5 million, or 64 cents per share, last year. Analysts expected net income of 65 cents per share, according to FactSet.

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    Amazon starts AmazonLocal online deals site

    Online retailer Amazon.com is trying to become a bigger player in the mushrooming market for online deals. It has launched a website that offers large discounts on local goods and services.

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    Google strikes deal to acquire daily deal service

    Google Inc.'s latest deal aims to help people find the best daily deals on the Web. In its latest acquisition of talent and technology, Google has bought Dealmap. It's a 15-month-old startup that compiles discount offers from local merchants scattered in markets across the nation.

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    Internet outage delays American flights at JFK

    American Airlines says an Internet outage shut down its reservation system at New York's Kennedy airport and delayed flights for about an hour.

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    Americans cut spending for first time in 20 months

    Americans cut spending for first time in 20 months Consumer spending dropped 0.2 percent in June, the Commerce Department said Tuesday. It was the first decline since September 2009.

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    Z Trim Holdings records best month ever, completes plant upgrades

    MUNDELEIN — Z Trim Holdings said it has completed the installation of new plant equipment needed to increase manufacturing capacity. In addition, July was the company’s best month of manufacturing output in its history. “The new equipment is now up and running,” said Steve Cohen, Z Trim CEO. “We expect to see month-over-month growth in production and sales.”Z Trim Holdings deploys technology, formulation, and product performance solutions built around multifunctional dietary fibers for both domestic and international food markets. Made from either corn bran or oat hulls, Z Trim fiber ingredients contribute multifunctional attributes for food product design and processing, including moisture management, texture and appearance quality, fat and calorie reduction, clean labeling, and cost-control. Z Trim can provide enhanced eating quality, outstanding product performance, and frequently, improved nutritional profiles in meats, sauces, dressings, microwaveable hand-held snacks, baked goods, fillings, toppings, prepared meals, ice cream, cream cheese, dips, and many other food products.

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    UL acquires German medical device testing companies

    NORTHBROOK — UL has acquired MDT medical device testing GmbH and MD registration support Ltd., both based in Ochsenhausen, Germany.They will become part of UL’s Life and Health business unit.  MDT is a leading accredited and GLP certified test laboratory for the medical services industry.  MDT specializes in clinical and nonclinical testing services for regulatory and routine control purposes.  Its testing services include clinical investigations as a clinical research organization and comprehensive nonclinical testing services such as physicochemical and chemical analyses, physical testing, mechanical testing, biocompatibility testing, microbiological and virological testing, cytotoxicity testing and validation of cleaning, reprocessing, sterilization and packaging processes.MDRS’s advisory services enable customers to meet comprehensive medical device registration requirements through technical documentation, risk assessment, clinical evaluation, evaluation of biocompatibility, classification of medical devices and quality management assessments.UL will now offer a complete suite of services that will help medical device manufacturers produce safer devices and products, including key medical device testing. The addition of MDT and MDRS will further support UL on a global scale to help medical device manufacturers obtain required medical device certification.In an effort to meet the growing demands of the medical device market, the acquisition gives UL best-in-class global capabilities that will be offered to both its current customer base, and more notably, to a larger segment of medical device manufacturers, that perform critical health functions in the human body. This includes orthopedic, ophthalmic, and many cardiovascular implantable devices.  “MDT and UL share the vision of providing comprehensive clinical and nonclinical services, with the sole purpose of supporting manufacturers provide safe and effective medical devices to patients around the globe,” said Dr. Dieter R. Dannhorn, CEO and president, MDT and MDRS.  “Together, we can provide a full spectrum of testing and consulting services necessary to help medical device companies develop and manufacture innovative medical devices and document safety and effectiveness of these products throughout the product’s life cycle.”MDT and MDRS will become part of UL’s Life and Health business unit.  MDT and MDRS will continue to be headquartered in Ochsenhausen, Germany.  Dr. Dieter R. Dannhorn will remain with the companies and serve as the General Manager.  About mdt medical device testing GmbH (MDT)

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    Economy pressures push OfficeMax 2Q results down slightly
    PRNewswireNAPERVILLE — OfficeMax Incorporated said total sales in the second quarter decreased slightly as demand in the office supply sector continues to remain soft.Total sales were $1,6 million in the second quarter of 2011, a decrease of 0.3% from the second quarter of 2010.  For the second quarter of 2011, OfficeMax reported a net loss available to OfficeMax common shareholders of $3.0 million, or $0.04 per diluted share.   “We continued to experience top line softness as a result of the difficult macroeconomic environment but have made progress on gross margin initiatives. We remain focused on executing the fundamentals better, enhancing the management team and improving the operations of the business,” said Ravi Saligram, president and CEO of OfficeMax,Results for the second quarter of 2011 and 2010 included certain charges and income that are not considered indicative of core operating activities.  Second quarter 2011 results included a $5.6 million pretax charge recorded in the retail segment related to store closures; and pretax severance charges of $8.3 million related to reorganizations in Canada, Australia, and the U.S. sales and supply chain organizations.As a result, adjusted operating income in the second quarter of 2011 was $17.9 million, or 1.1% of sales, compared to $25.3 million, or 1.5% of sales in the second quarter of 2010.  Adjusted net income available to OfficeMax common shareholders in the second quarter of 2011 was $6.0 million, or $0.07 per diluted share, compared to $10.0 million, or $0.12 per diluted share, in the second quarter of 2010.

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    Study: iPhone users are most connected at 30,000 feet

    ITASCA — There might be more Android devices in the market, but when it comes to staying connected at 30,000 feet, iPhone users reign supreme, according to airline Wi-Fi provider Gogo.Apple iPhone users account for 65 percent of mobile users accessing Gogo’s Wi-Fi service in air, while Android users account for just 12 percent.  If you add travelers connecting using their iPod touch, Apple’s iOS system accounts for 80 percent of the mobile travelers connecting to Gogo’s Wi-Fi service.BlackBerry users account for just 6 percent, while Windows and all other devices make up the remaining 2 percent of users.“Many smartphone users simply aren’t aware that you can turn your phone service off on a Gogo equipped plane, yet still access the Internet through a Wi-Fi enabled mobile device and surf the Web, send email and access most of the features of your smartphone aside from making a phone call,” said Ash ElDifrawi, Gogo’s chief marketing officer.  “It’s clear that iPhone users are ahead of the curve in understanding those capabilities, but more and more people are starting to discover how to connect using their smartphone on a plane.”According to recent reports, the number of smartphones in the market now outpaces traditional cellphones.  For the vast majority of those smartphone users, accessing the Web or email is critical.“As the number of smartphone users continues to skyrocket, we’d expect that the number of passengers using their mobile devices to access the Internet in air will also continue to grow,” added ElDifrawi.  “As we strive to make Gogo everyone’s favorite part of flying, we will make efforts to assure that mobile passengers have a unique set of experiences that are tailor made for the mobile audience.”

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    A.M. Castle 2Q sales up 18 percent

    OAK BROOK — A. M. Castle & Co. reported its consolidated net sales increased 17.7 percent for the second quarter, which ended June 30.Consolidated net sales were $282.6 million for the three-months ended June 30, an increase of 17.7 percent compared to $240.1 million in the second quarter of 2010. The company’s net income for the period was $3.7 million, compared to $0.4 million in the prior year quarter. Second quarter results included a charge of $800,000 for expected export penalties associated with shipments that occurred from 2005 to 2008.Sales in the company’s metals segment were $252.3 million, $39.0 million or 18.3 percent higher than last year. Metals segment tons sold per day were up 18.1 percent from the second quarter of 2010 and up 3.9 percent compared to the first quarter of 2011.In the plastics segment, second quarter 2011 sales of $30.3 million were $3.5 million, 13.1 percent higher than the prior year, reflecting improved demand across virtually all markets, most notably automotive, life sciences and retail point-of-purchase display sectors.Consolidated net sales were $555.4 million, an increase of 19.9 percent compared to $463.1 million last year. Net income for the first half of 2011 was $6.4 million, as compared to a net loss of $4.2 million for the same period last year.“We experienced strong sales volume in the second quarter, reflecting continued improvement in demand within several key end-use markets including oil and gas, mining and heavy equipment, general industrial markets and automotive.” said Michael Goldberg, president and CEO of A. M. Castle. “We believe that our value-added strategies resonate with our customers and our strong top-line sales growth is indicative of the value our customers place on the solutions and services that we provide,“We have been working to build inventory levels while maintaining turnover rates in order to support the sales growth that we are experiencing in our end markets, particularly oil and gas and energy, heavy equipment and the general industrial market,” he added.A. M. Castle & Co. is a global distributor of specialty metal and plastic products and supply chain services, principally serving the producer durable equipment, oil and gas, commercial aircraft, heavy equipment, industrial goods, construction equipment, retail, marine and automotive sectors.

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    Hyatt second-quarter earnings rise on busienss travel demand

    Hyatt Hotels Corp., the chain controlled by the Pritzker family, reported second-quarter earnings that beat analysts' estimates, helped by increased business travel and demand at its international locations.

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    Toyota ekes out quarterly profit, raises forecast

    Toyota eked out a 1.1 billion yen ($14 million) quarterly profit and raised its annual earnings forecast Tuesday as it mounts a comeback from the devastation of the earthquake and tsunami in northeastern Japan.Still, April-June profit for Toyota Motor Corp. was a fraction of the 190.4 billion yen it earned a year earlier.

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    President of European Central Bank Jean-Claude Trichet

    Economic fears could deter ECB rate hikes

    Worries about Europe's economy and a possible worsening of the debt crisis could force the European Central Bank to abandon a third interest rate increase that had been widely predicted for later this year.

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    Molson Coors Brewing Co. says that its profit fell 6 percent in the second quarter, as increased prices and cost cuts were more than offset by lower sales volumes and higher commodity costs.

    Molson Coors 2Q profit falls on higher costs

    Molson Coors Brewing Co. says that its profit fell 6 percent in the second quarter, as increased prices and cost cuts were more than offset by lower sales volumes and higher commodity costs.

Life & Entertainment

  •  
    The Mountain Goats are excited to play in front of Lollapalooza's crowd this weekend.

    Mountain Goats bring literary touches to folk-rock songs

    The Mountain Goats, a North Carolina band known for folk-tinged rock melodies and dark, witty lyrics, will hit the stage at Lollapalooza this weekend in Chicago. The band is touring behind "All Eternals Deck," its acclaimed new record on the venerable Merge label.

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    The moody Chicago rock band Disappears will play Lollapalooza on Saturday afternoon.

    For Chicago's Disappears, less is more

    Listen to Chicago band Disappears, and you enter a shimmery, shadowy world that's both exhilarating and frightening. The band plays Lollapalooza this weekend.

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    Like gritty, grimy rock 'n' roll? The Black Lips will deliver just that at Lollapalooza.

    Black Lips find new sounds for latest record

    If there's any band playing Lollapalooza that could benefit from hot, steamy weather, it's The Black Lips. The much-buzzed-about Atlanta band delivers a wonderfully dirty brand of garage-punk — songs that would pack even more punch in the heat of a sweaty evening.

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    Big crowds are expected in Grant Park this weekend as Lollapalooza celebrates its 20th anniversary.

    Though no longer cutting edge, Lollapalooza still delivers

    Lollapalooza, the mammoth music fest in Grant Park, returns this weekend! Dozens of bands will be performing, from industry superstars like Eminem to underground groups just starting to make a name for themselves.

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    Brad Anders relies on an electric roaster to cook his baby back ribs to fall-of-the-bone perfection. The recipe for Brad's Oh My Oatmeal Cake appears online at dailyherald.com/entlife/food.

    Heart-shaped meatloaf way to woman's heart

    When Lisa Anders looks forward to celebrating a special occasion, she doesn't think about restaurant reservations. Her husband, Brad, can whip up a special meal or dessert to rival any dining establishment. “He can cook and bake better than I can and most people I know,” said Lisa, who nominated Brad for Cook of the Week.

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    Harry Shum Jr. hopes to get a chance to sing on the new season of "Glee," which returns to Fox Sept. 21.

    Harry Shum Jr. hopes to sing in 'Glee' season 3

    Harry Shum Jr.'s character on "Glee" may be a member of the glee club but that doesn't mean he's gotten the chance to sing. In real life, Shum says he's been taking vocal lessons and hopes to get a shot at singing on the show in season three.

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    Beekeeper Michael Thompson examines a small section of a beehive frame on top of City Hall in Chicago. , consisting of a beeswax comb, honey, brood and pollen,

    Restaurant buzz

    A good restaurant is always abuzz with activity, but some chefs are taking the concept literally, installing rooftop beehives. The idea appears to be mainly to give the ailing bee population a boost, though having a ready supply of the sweet stuff for use in the restaurant below is a good thing, too.

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    Cucumber and Radish Salad with Mint

    Cucumber and Radish Salad with Mint
    Mint: Cucumber and Mint Salad

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    Courtesy of Connie Fairbanks Chilled Canteloupe Soup

    Chilled Cantaloupe Soup
    Mint: Canteloupe soup

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    This recipe for Lamb with Mint Yogurt Sauce calls for stovetop cooking, but these chops could just as easily be tossed on the grill.

    Lamb Chops with Mint-Yogurt Sauce
    Mint: Lamb and Mint

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    While not as common in the U.S., much of the world finds a place for mint in their savory cooking. The mint in this Penne With Mushroom and Mint invigorates the meatiness of the wild mushrooms.

    Penne with Mushrooms and Mint
    Mint: Penne with Mint and Mushrooms

  •  
    Watermelon

    Watermelon full of lycopene

    Q. How nutritious is watermelon compared to other fruits?A. Each cup of watermelon (about half a large slice) offers about 13 milligrams of vitamin C (14-17 percent of currently recommended daily intake). For those watching their weight, a one-cup serving can satisfy a sweet tooth with just 49 calories.

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    "Bachelorette" Ashley Hebert kisses J.P. Rosenbaum on the season finale of "The Bachelorette" in Fiji. Hebert chose the 34-year-old construction manager over winemaker Ben Flajnik in Monday's two-hour finale.

    'Bachelorette' picks her guy, gets engaged

    "Bachelorette" Ashley Hebert has picked her match made in network TV heaven. The last man standing on the ABC dating reality show "The Bachelorette" is J.P. Rosenbaum from New York's Long Island.

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    In the fourth, and final, issue of “Ultimate Fallout,” the mantle of Spider-Man hero has been taken on by Miles Morales, a young African-American.

    Marvel: New Ultimate Spider-Man boasts big changes

    Peter Parker is dead and gone, but Spider-Man's still slinging webs and fighting crime. And it's not just a new teenager climbing Manhattan buildings, it's an entirely new crime-fighter, from the color of his suit to the complexion of his skin.

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    Oh My Oatmeal Cake
    Oatmeal Cake:Brad Anders

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    The Key to Her Heart Carrot Cake
    Carrot Cake:Brad Anders

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    Mark Welsh/mwelsh@dailyherald.com Bartlett’s Brad Anders’ famous rib rub topping is a family favorite.

    Fall Off the Bone Slow Cooked Baby Back Ribs
    Slow-cooked Ribs: Brad Anders

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    Actress and singer Jennifer Lopez, on the cover of "Vanity Fair" magazine, says she still believes in love despite her split from her husband of seven years, Marc Anthony.

    Jennifer Lopez talks about split from Marc Anthony

    Jennifer Lopez tells Vanity Fair magazine that she still believes in love despite her split from her husband of seven years, Marc Anthony. Lopez says she is an "eternal optimist" and describes love as her "biggest dream."

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    Members of Kings of Leon Jared Followill, left, Nathan Followill, Matthew Followill and Caleb Followill have canceled the rest of the band's U.S. tour.

    Kings of Leon cancels rest of U.S. tour

    Kings of Leon singer Caleb Followill is suffering from vocal problems and exhaustion, forcing the band on Monday to cancel its U.S. tour. “Thanks to all our true fans for understanding and helping us through this hard time,” Caleb Followill said on Twitter.

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    Carisa Barreca performs with Jimmy Carlson in “Sex & The Second City: A Romantic Dot Comedy” at the Metropolis Performing Arts Centre in Arlington Heights.

    AH native living Second City dream at Metropolis

    Arlington Heights' native Carisa Barreca has been seeing Second City shows “since an age when I was way too young to be seeing Second City shows.” Now, she's starring in one at the Metropolis.

  •  
    “Wanted Dead or Alive: Manhunts From Geronimo to Bin Laden” by Benjamin Runkle

    ‘Wanted’ targets U.S. military’s strategic manhunts

    Benjamin Runkle's “Wanted Dead or Alive” details the hunts for Osama bin Laden, Geronimo and other targeted individuals throughout history. Although there is no shortage of books about bin Laden, Runkle breaks new ground by putting his story in the context of earlier manhunts.

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    Cheryl and Dan Pessetti of St. Charles were among those who attended the first Lollapalooza back in 1991.

    Suburban fans recall 1991 Lolla

    St. Charles resident Cheryl Pessetti speaks for a whole generation of music fans when she considers the fact that Lollapalooza is celebrating its 20th anniversary this year. “That makes me feel so old!" she said.

Discuss

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    Now, let's find long-term solution to debt problem

    The spirit of compromise triumphed to end the debt ceiling crisis, a Daily Herald editorial says, but the heavy lifting on the toughest budget questions still lies ahead.

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    Green with tea party envy

    The tea party knows precisely what it wants to do. But it has recklessly diminished the power and reach of the United States. It has shrunk the government and will, if it can, further deprive it of revenue.

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    Keeping tabs on taxpayer-backed ‘p-cards’

    Without oversight of government-issued procurement cards, the waste of taxpayer dollars is virtually unavoidable. The Better Government Association offers suggestions on how governing bodies can manage these taxpayer-funded debit-type cards.

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    Unwise to send kids to Kane youth center
    Judge Stan Austin and Judge Robert Anderson have opposed the closing of the DuPage Youth Center and moving of the youth to St. Charles. What is not included in your article is information from a recent report that discloses that the St. Charles facility offers a woeful program for youth.

  •  

    Who’s the bigoted person here?
    You published a pile of hogwash Friday, July 22, under the title of ”Cain Scrutiny.” Whenever liberals dislike what is going on they try to pull out this ”racist” and ”bigotry” stuff. In this case, the usual racist thing was not applicable, leaving only the bigotry issue.

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    Hey, GOP, here’s how to cut spending
    Republicans — want to reduce government spending? If you or any members of your family are drawing Social Security payments, stop them. If you or any member of your family is availing themselves of Medicare benefits, opt out. If you or any member of your family is drawing any other government (federal, state, local) benefits, cancel the program(s). If you or any member of your family is serving in the military, receiving veteran’s benefits or other military financial assistance, resign/don’t re-up. If you or any member of your family is receiving any form of subsidy, cancel it. These pure party actions may not save us much money to begin with, but think of the broader ramifications. These brave moves by millions could save the nation billions. Be true to your principles. Save America from financial ruin. Do it now.Vern LeeWillowbrook

  •  

    Bigger fool: Jobs Czar or Obama?
    Who is the biggest fool: Jeffrey Immelt, appointed Jobs Czar, CEO of General Electric, makes millions a year, reduced GE’s work force and now he is moving GE’s global X-ray headquarters to China at a cost of $2 billion, or President Obama, who appointed Mr. Immelt as Jobs Czar?

  •  

    Show support for peaceful Norway
    I feel a tremendous sadness and heavy heart for the people of Norway. While the majority of Norwegians enjoy a socialistic government, this one demented individual was able to destroy the idyllic lifestyle of so many people.

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    Gambling interests are too involved
    It is anyone one’s bet which state has a more illustrious history of corruption: Illinois or Louisiana. I say the odds are even.

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    Let’s target those who pay no taxes
    These people who pay nothing are quick to point the finger at the successful entrepreneurs of our society and demand that they pay higher taxes. Would 50 percent make them happy? How about 60 percent of their income? Where does it end?

  •  

    Enough intransigence from tea party
    Letter to the Editor: Where did the tea party members of Congress ever get the notion that the citizens of this nation were willing to walk off an economic cliff to support their intransigent philosophy? Extremism is destroying us. Fire the tea party. Restore sanity.

  •  

    Hemp, solar, wind won’t solve problem
    Letter to the Editor: I realize that some people believe that wind, solar and other so-called green solutions can provide the electricity and energy we need, but they can’t. It is an indisputable fact that wind and solar cannot generate very much electricity, and what they do produce is outlandishly expensive.

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    Don’t use GI’s as pawns in budget debate
    Letter to the Editor: President Obama, as Commander in Chief, using the military as a pawn in the debt debate was despicable. How are you going to look a GI in the eye when you know that he knows you have so little regard for him and his family?

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